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2012-10-06 23:02:26
2012-10-06 23:02:26

If the visitation is court ordered and the non-compliant parent can provide no compelling and acceptable reasons why they are not adhering, yes.

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It the non custodial parent alters the court ordered visitation, the other parent does not have to allow the visitation, unless it was altered in court. If it was not altered in court, the parent can file for contempt of court.


It depends on the details. If the parent is taking the child but not picking the child up and returning him at the stated times then you can file a motion for contempt of a court order. If the parent is not exercising the visitation rights there is little you can do.



If the noncustodial parent tries to keep the child, the custodial parent can get the noncustodial parent charged with kidnapping and contempt of court both can be jail time for the noncustodial.



Yes, although the contempt citation is issued by the court after receiving documentation from the custodial parent of the failure of the noncustodial parent to obey the existing court order.


If there is no court mandated agreement that ensures the noncustodial parent visitation rights, then yes they can.


You must return to the court where the visitation order was issued and submit a motion for contempt against the parent who has denied visitation.


He/she can file a motion for contempt of court, and if granted, a change of custody. I teach parents how to collect evidence and how to do this without the need of hiring an attorney. see link



if the child doesn't want to see the noncustodial parent he doesn't have too. don't force him to do it =)


Unless visitation rights for the non-custodial parent were allowed in the divorce paperwork, the custodial parent is completely within their rights to deny the non-custodial parent visitation....however, the non-custodial parent may sue for visitation rights.






If the visitation schedule says overnight visitation, yes. The visitation schedule is a court order. If the custodial parent violates the order the non-custodial parent can file a motion for contempt.


A custodial parent is obligated to let the non-custodial visit the child if there is visitation schedule in place. If there is none, it is not illegal for the custodial parent to refuse visitation.


Age the age of majority, when they are also allowed to end visitation to school.


If there is a court order yes. Then you have to work on this the both of you.


180 days per year, per parent on a 2 year average.


No. A child does not have the right to ignore court ordered visitation. A parent who assists the child would be in contempt of court.


The child visitation order must be obeyed. If the child refuses to go the non-custodial parent can file a motion for contempt and the custodial parent will need to explain the situation to the court.The child visitation order must be obeyed. If the child refuses to go the non-custodial parent can file a motion for contempt and the custodial parent will need to explain the situation to the court.The child visitation order must be obeyed. If the child refuses to go the non-custodial parent can file a motion for contempt and the custodial parent will need to explain the situation to the court.The child visitation order must be obeyed. If the child refuses to go the non-custodial parent can file a motion for contempt and the custodial parent will need to explain the situation to the court.


The one who would be responsible for the child during that time which would be the non custodial parent.


it shouldnt matter. if the parent has custidy and the other dont and there is no visitation rights then then yes the perant can move



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