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Answered 2007-01-11 14:53:45

No, they should not be required to provide their SSN. Estate holdings should be liquidated using the Estate's tax number. If there isn't one, then the executor is slipping up. Worst case would be to use the SSN of the deceased. Transactions have to be associated with a tax number. * The executor/executrix/administrator of the estate (whatever the title) is required to supply his or her SSN as well as that of the deceased or the TID when making a claim for the deceased estate with an insurance company and other such matters.

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If they are going to get paid for their services, yes. And if they are inheriting anything from the estate they will have to provide it.


No. They are required by law to settle an estate with expediency. If the executor, or co-executor, is delaying the distribution for no apparent reason they should be reported to the court. They can be replaced.No. They are required by law to settle an estate with expediency. If the executor, or co-executor, is delaying the distribution for no apparent reason they should be reported to the court. They can be replaced.No. They are required by law to settle an estate with expediency. If the executor, or co-executor, is delaying the distribution for no apparent reason they should be reported to the court. They can be replaced.No. They are required by law to settle an estate with expediency. If the executor, or co-executor, is delaying the distribution for no apparent reason they should be reported to the court. They can be replaced.


The executor had no idea how much work was required in settling an estate.


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No, they are required to execute the will as written.


All the rights required. He or she does not need to be an executor to receive any bequest. It is the responsibility and legal duty of the executor to carry out the wishes of the deceased.


The Executor is required to administer the estate according to the terms of the will. He is required to contact the beneficiaries and supply them with a copy of the will. Further, the executor is required to handle all claims against the estate, secure all property, and pays any debts the estate may have, including taxes.


An adult child can be the executor. They can also be a beneficiary. They are required to be impartial when distributing the estate.


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The executor is required to distribute the will according to its terms. Who that is should not affect the distribution.


The executor is required to provide a full accounting. The court can request one on a regular basis.


Yes. The executor can file a resignation with the court. They may be required to file an accounting of their activities up to that point. The court will appoint a new executor.




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The naming of the executor is something done by the person making the will. If they are still living, they can do what they like and no signature is required.


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The executor must make a reasonable and diligent search for property. They cannot be "required" to find unknown property. The heirs and relatives should assist by notifying the executor of any property they have knowledge of.


The executor is required to fulfill the requirements of the will. If there is no will, they need to follow the state's rules for intestacy. The executor is entitled to compensation. They are also responsible for a full inventory of the estate, paying the taxes and filling the appropriate information with the court.


If your grandmother is still living, you can't. If she is deceased, the executor of the will is required to notify you if you are in the will. If there is no will, and your parents are deceased, then you should contact the probate court and/or executor.


The executor is required to execute the terms of the Will, or follow the laws of intestacy (if there was no Will), not comply with the wishes of the heirs.


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No. By law the executor must send notification of the probate procedure. An executor, including any executor named in the will, has no authority until they have been appointed by the probate court. As part of that request to be appointed they are required by law to send notice of their request to the heirs at law and beneficiaries under the will.



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