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Answered 2009-12-08 01:44:00

If court ordered? Yes. If she's collecting Welfare? Yes
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It is not clear from your question whether you are the father of the child. If you are the father of the child, you are legally obligated to pay child support if a child support order has been entered by a court. If you are not the father of the child but are living with the child's mother you are not obligated to pay child support.


No,the same rules apply wether you are the father or the mother you are not obligated to pay support.


The parent either mother or father is obligated to pay child support until that child/children turn 18 years old.



If you mean, the child's mother (ex-wife) has custody, the child's father (ex-husband) is obligated or potentially obligated for support.


The father of the child (whether he was ever legally married to the child's mother or not) is obligated to pay the child support. His new spouse cannot be LEGALLY obligated to pay it since she has no part in the action at all, but there is no bar to her helping her husband pay it if she wishes to do so.


For herself, it can affect the percentage of extras she's obligated to carry.


Whatever the judge mandates. If you can go to court and get a different amount for child support, go for it. Good luck.


Yes, if the father is not given custody he will be obligated to keep paying support to whomever the court awards custody or guardianship of the children.


The non custodial parent pays child support. If the father has custody of the child then the mother pays child support and vice versa. If the father is the non custodial parent and is in school he is still obligated to pay child support whether he is unemployed or not. The only thing that can relinquish a support order is if the parent is incarcerated and not receiving an income, if you sign over your rights ( which in some cases you might still be obligated to pay ) or if you die.


The court that issued the order has jurisdiction but moving can complicate the situation. You should consult with an attorney or some other child support enforcement specialist. Courts will enforce child support orders from other states however, with reduced staff, it may be difficult to find that kind of support.



The spouse is not obligated to pay but your incomes may be taken into account when they determine how much he pays every month on his back child support.


The father should contact the clerk of the court where the support order was enacted for information on how to rectify the situation. Even if the mother has agreed to stop support payments it is not legally binding until the court issues an order stating such. If the father is in arrears he will most likely be obligated to pay the amount before the court considers ending support obligations. Likewise, if the support payments have been made through the state's social services it may not be possible for the mother to or father to engage in the action canceling support obligations.


This depends on the state. In some, if the man is not the father, he's not obligated to pay, while in others he is. If he is the father, he's obligated to pay in nearly every state, plus all court costs. see relate link on post cases


The courts are the ones who award the support to the mother. If the father, all of a sudden, begins supporting the mother and child, he is still obligated to pay support according to the court. That's because the courts don't know about it. They person involved would have to have the support removed at the court level. But morally speaking, he does not need to pay the support and if he doesn't, wouldn't get in any trouble unless the mother turns him in.


Not if the father hasn't requested a visitation schedule. The mother should allow the father to visit with the child. However, if there is no visitation order in place she won't "get into trouble" if he's is not having visitations with the child. Child support and visitations are two separate issues as far as the court is concerned.Fathers are entitled to visitations. If the mother refuses the father should return to court and request a visitation schedule. The mother will be legally obligated to obey that order.Not if the father hasn't requested a visitation schedule. The mother should allow the father to visit with the child. However, if there is no visitation order in place she won't "get into trouble" if he's is not having visitations with the child. Child support and visitations are two separate issues as far as the court is concerned.Fathers are entitled to visitations. If the mother refuses the father should return to court and request a visitation schedule. The mother will be legally obligated to obey that order.Not if the father hasn't requested a visitation schedule. The mother should allow the father to visit with the child. However, if there is no visitation order in place she won't "get into trouble" if he's is not having visitations with the child. Child support and visitations are two separate issues as far as the court is concerned.Fathers are entitled to visitations. If the mother refuses the father should return to court and request a visitation schedule. The mother will be legally obligated to obey that order.Not if the father hasn't requested a visitation schedule. The mother should allow the father to visit with the child. However, if there is no visitation order in place she won't "get into trouble" if he's is not having visitations with the child. Child support and visitations are two separate issues as far as the court is concerned.Fathers are entitled to visitations. If the mother refuses the father should return to court and request a visitation schedule. The mother will be legally obligated to obey that order.


One would assume the father has access rights and would figure out the child no longer resides with the mother. He will be notified that the child support will be going to a different receiver. see links below


Only the legal guardian or custodial parent can do this and in this case I have a feeling it's the mother so no, he can not.


Any mother can go to court in the US to claim child support form the father for a child she is caring for. Babies are not born by spontaneous combustion. The father is as responsible for the child's welfare as is the mother. If the child is living with the father and custody given to the father, the mother is liable for child support, too.


If the divorce ordered the father to pay support, he owes that support until/unless the order is modified.


Typically, no; if you're under court order to do so, however, get an order terminating support (and setting the amount of arrearage, if any) - do not simply stop paying on your own.


Yes the father would still have to pay child support if he did not have custody of the child and the mother did not work.


Giving up parental rights has nothing to do with paying support. As the natural father, you are obligated to support the child the mother will be raising and can be ordered to do so by the court. You made the decisions; the consequences are yours. Think of the child and his or her needs through childhood. Would you want to be left behind because your father didn't want to support you?


The mother must petition for child support.The mother must petition for child support.The mother must petition for child support.The mother must petition for child support.