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2012-03-20 19:19:03
2012-03-20 19:19:03

This question is a bit difficult to understand. I believe they are asking about Veterinary assistant training. IF that is the case, then yes, vet assistants do need training. I believe that most vets will provide potential assistants with some training, but you can go to school for it as well!

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Choosing a career as a veterinary technician means caring for all kinds ... Learn what you need to do to become a certified veterinary technician. ... Veterinary Tech Training Information Find out how to choose the right ... Learn about getting into the field as a veterinary assistant and the duties they perform. ...


There are few or none specific education requirements for a veterinary assistant. They mostly rely upon on the job training.


A veterinary nurse (usually called a veterinary technician or veterinary assistant) needs to have at least a high school diploma and some on-the-job training at a vet clinic to be a "lay tech" or "lay assistant". To become a registered veterinary techinician you will need to complete a two or four year program at a college and pass a license exam.


This will depend upon your definition of "better". A veterinary technician tends to have more training and a higher pay scale, but also has more responsibilities. A veterinary assistant tends to have less training, minimal or no formal training and a lower pay scale, but also tends to have less responsibility.


You can get started on your veterinary assistant career with no formal educational requirements. Veterinary assistants receive on-the-job training only and you can look for positons on websites such as monster.com


You should take some biology, chemistry, zoology or veterinary medicine


You can take high school courses such as small animal care and office management. The best way is to go to training courses at your local veterinary. The best training is the one you get as a volunteer. Assuming you live in the United States, there are no requirements for education or training to work as a veterinary assistant. This is an entry-level position and training is usually done on the job. There are courses available for veterinary technicians and liscenced veterinarians, which might be useful in advancing your career.


You do not have to attend college to become a veterinary assistant. Veterinary assisting is an entry level position and no state requires any special education or training for veterinary assistants.


You need a high school diploma for pretty much any decent job (yes, that includes veterinary assistant).


Yes, the average veterinary position does indeed train you for that position. It is usually pretty thorough.


Animal Health Technology, Vet Assistant Colleges - Education Reference


In the United States, there are no educational or training requirements for becoming a veterinary assistant. This is an entry-level position and training is generally done on the job. There are classes that can be taken in high school and through different colleges and university that can give you an advantage for finding a job as a veterinary assistant. When choosing a veterinary assisting program, it is best to look for one that is offered by a veterinary medical association or a college that also has an American Veterinary Medical Association accredited veterinary technology program.


The position of veterinary assistant is an entry-level position for veterinary staff and there are no required skills or education. However, experience with animals is highly valued.


Veterinary assistants get paid anywhere from minimum wage to $14 an hour in the US. The reason for the variation is that there are no legal requirements for special education or training for veterinary assistants and in many states there are legal limits set on what a veterinary assistant may do in a veterinary practice. Experience also plays a part in what pay rate is given to an assistant.


what does a veterinary assistant usually wear?


No state in the US has any educational requirements for working as a veterinary ASSISTANT. This is an entry level-position in a veterinary facility and training is generally done on the job. You can simply apply at veterinary facilities for a position as a veterinary assistant. There are voluntary educational opportunities, however these are not equivalent to a college degree program and are instead basic vocational training. There is no over-sight by a professional body to ensure that the majority of these programs provide adequate or correct information. There is no requirement for hands-on training and instructors often have little or no experience or education in the veterinary field. There are a handful of certification programs that are designed and approved by veterinary professional organizations or that are offered by colleges which also offer accredited veterinary technology programs and these are better choices for someone who wants to be a veterinary assistant. All of these programs offer certification as a veterinary assistant, but this certification is not legally recognized or required by any state in the US.


Veterinary assisting is an entry-level position and special education, training or certification is typically not required. There are veterinary assistant training programs and the time required to complete them ranges from a few weeks to a year. However, many of these programs are not viewed as respectable by veterinarians. If special training is sought, veterinary assisting programs offered through a college with an AVMA accredited veterinary technology program or that is approved by a veterinary medical or veterinary technician association should be selected.


No state in the US has educational or training requirements for a veterinary assistant. This is an entry-level position for veterinary staff and training is generally done on the job. There are some schools that offer veterinary assisting programs and "certify" their students however many of these are not overseen by an veterinary professionals or professional organizations and are often taught by people with no education or experience in the veterinary field. For people interested in enrolling in a veterinary assisting program, a wise choice would be to select programs offered by colleges that also offer an American Veterinary Medical Association accredited veterinary technology program or a veterinary assisting program that has been designed or approved by a veterinary professional association.


No state in the US has educational or training requirements for a veterinary assistant. This is an entry-level position for veterinary staff and training is generally done on the job. There are some schools that offer veterinary assisting programs and "certify" their students however many of these are not overseen by an veterinary professionals or professional organizations and are often taught by people with no education or experience in the veterinary field. For people interested in enrolling in a veterinary assisting program, a wise choice would be to select programs offered by colleges that also offer an American Veterinary Medical Association accredited veterinary technology program or a veterinary assisting program that has been designed or approved by a veterinary professional association.


In the United States, a veterinary assistant is a lay person who is typically trained on the job in non-invasive tasks such as drawing up vaccines, filling prescriptions and taking medical histories. In general, a veterinary assistant has not attended college specifically for vet assistant training; a veterinary technician is more likely to have attended a college-based vet tech training program.


No, veterinary assisting is an entry-level position with no state requiring education or credentialing.


Veterinary assisting is an entry-level position in a veterinary facility. There are no legal requirements for education, training or certification. Most veterinary assistants are hired and trained on the job with little or no prior experience.


Full-time veterinary technician students, pursuing a certificate, diploma, or associate's degree, typically complete their veterinary technician training in two years.


No state in the US has educational or training requirements for a veterinary assistant. This is an entry-level position for veterinary staff and training is generally done on the job. There are some schools that offer veterinary assisting programs and "certify" their students however many of these are not overseen by an veterinary professionals or professional organizations and are often taught by people with no education or experience in the veterinary field. For people interested in enrolling in a veterinary assisting program, a wise choice would be to select programs offered by colleges that also offer an American Veterinary Medical Association accredited veterinary technology program or a veterinary assisting program that has been designed or approved by a veterinary professional association.


No state in the US has educational or training requirements for a veterinary assistant. This is an entry-level position for veterinary staff and training is generally done on the job. There are some schools that offer veterinary assisting programs and "certify" their students however many of these are not overseen by an veterinary professionals or professional organizations and are often taught by people with no education or experience in the veterinary field. For people interested in enrolling in a veterinary assisting program, a wise choice would be to select programs offered by colleges that also offer an American Veterinary Medical Association accredited veterinary technology program or a veterinary assisting program that has been designed or approved by a veterinary professional association.



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