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No, in his time slavery was an acceptable practice.

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โˆ™ 2017-04-11 01:43:37
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Q: John Quincy Adams brought light to the dark issue of slavery?
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What events were going on during John Quincy Adams' presidency?

Well, slavery was a big issue in the United States at the time. Mr. Adams was strongly against slavery just like his father. Which makes His father, John Adams, my favorite President of the United States.


What was the Main issue of John Quincy Adams presidency?

relocation of the Native Americans


What issue brought about the organization of the repulican party?

Slavery


What issue brought about the organization of the republic party?

slavery


The main issue of John Quincy Adams presidency was?

i have no clue but you need to get your facts right


The main issue of John Quincy Adams's presidency was?

foreign affairs, read the book.


What document did James Monroe issue?

The Monroe Doctrine (written mainly by John Quincy Adams)


The election of 1844 was notable because?

It brought slavery issue into politics


Which president had a stroke while debating an issue in congress and die two days later?

John Quincy Adams


Where was John Adams buried?

Both John Adams and his son John Quincy Adams are buried in there family crypt beneath the United First Parish Church, Quincy, Massachusetts.For the source and more detailed information concerning this issue, click on the related links section indicated below.


Why did John Quincy Adams urge the president to issue the Monroe Doctrine?

couze thre were unicorn bad unicorn who killled people and they need to be safe so they issue the monroe doctrine


How did Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams differ on the slavery issue?

John Quincy Adams, like his father and Benjamin Franklin would like to see slavery abolished but was willing to compromise in order to unite the colonies into one nation. As Adams grew older, he and his friends became more abhorrent of slavery and began to actively seek ways to abolish it by federal law if states would not abolish it voluntarily. Andrew Jackson, on the other hand, grew up in a slave-owning society and was happy to take advantage of slave labor to further his own goals in life. He believed that states had the right to allow slavery and fought any federal attempt to restrict it in the states that wanted it.

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