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Latin help In English what does this mean Eam mecum in urbem ducere volo?

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2008-10-05 20:41:30
2008-10-05 20:41:30

I want to lead her into the city with me.

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urbem is Latin for city, the root of the word is the noun urbs, city (ergo: the English word urban)


"Urbe, urbem--urbs, urbis."


the accusative case for the latin word urbs, meaning ship, is urbem


"Urbem tuam mihi dona aut es mortuus" is the closest I can come.


The sentence 'Vir clarus manu sua dextra urbem quae in montibus fuit defenderat' is in Latin. In the word-by-word translation, the noun 'vir' means 'man'. The adjective 'clarus' means 'distinguished'. The noun 'manu' means 'hand'. The adjectives 'sua' and 'dextra' respectively mean 'his' and 'right'. The noun 'urbem' means 'city'. The word 'quae' means 'which'. The preposition 'in' means 'in'. The noun 'montibus' means 'the mountains'. The verb 'fuit' means '[he/she/it] was'; and the verb 'defenderat' means '[he/she/it] defended'. The English meaning therefore is as follows: With his right hand, the distinguished man defended the city which was in the mountains.


The motto of Letterkenny is 'Ubique Urbem Reminiscar'.


the brave men came to the great city.


Although the old men were tired, they hurried into the city is the English equivalent of 'Senes quamquam fessi erant in urbem festinabant'. The masculine gender noun 'senes', in the nominative plural as the subject of the sentence, means 'old men'. The conjunction 'quamquam' means 'although'. The masculine adjective 'fessi' is derived from the past participle of the infinitive 'fatiscere'. It's in the nominative plural, and means 'tired, exhausted'. The verb 'erant', as the third person plural of the imperfect indicative of 'esse', means '[they] were'. Combined into the present perfect, the phrase 'fessi erant' means '[they] have exhausted'. The preposition 'in' means 'in'. The noun 'urbem' means 'the city'. The verb 'festinabant', as the third person plural of the imperfect indicative of 'festinare', means '[they] hastened, hurried'.


but horatius cocles, who wasn't afraid of enemies,them in front of the bridge , which was entering in the city, with sword


Neither the Bible nor Eusebius discuss the death of Luke. The Book of the Acts of the Apostles in the New Testament, written by Luke, ends abruptly with the arrest of Paul and his journey to Roman. I infer that Luke, like Paul, died in the persecutions of Nero around 68 AD. The Catholic Encylclopedia has this to say: After St. Paul's martyrdom practically all that is known about him is contained in the ancient "Prefatio vel Argumentum Lucæ", dating back to Julius Africanus, who was born about A.D. 165. This states that he was unmarried, that he wrote the Gospel, in Achaia, and that he died at the age of seventy-four in Bithynia (probably a copyist's error for Bœotia), filled with the Holy Ghost. Epiphanius has it that he preached in Dalmatia (where there is a tradition to that effect), Gallia (Galatia?), Italy, and Macedonia. As an Evangelist, he must have suffered much for the Faith, but it is controverted whether he actually died a martyr's death. St. Jerome writes of him (De Vir. III., vii). "Sepultus est Constantinopoli, ad quam urbem vigesimo Constantii anno, ossa ejus *** reliquiis Andreæ Apostoli translata sunt [de Achaia?]." My Latin isn't very good, but I think this says he is buried in Constantinople (Istanbul), where his remains had been taken.


Aeneas has fallen deeply in love with Dido during the course of books II and III, and has even started work on the foundations of Carthage. But Jove sends Mercury to remind him that his destiny is to found Rome, and that he should not be becalmed on the north African coast, helping to build what will one day be Rome's most serious nemesis.Mercury's taunt begins at IV. 265Tu nunc Karthaginis altaefundamenta locas pulchramque uxorius urbemexstruis? heu! regni rerumque oblite tuarumAre you now placing the foundations of haughty Carthage, making a fine city, pussy-whipped? Oh dear! Have you forgotten your own kingdom and your own responsibilities?All through the poem Aneas is called pius (godfearing) - which means that Aneas' special strength as a hero is that he is willing to follow his destiny - ignoring his own desires where he has to.Mercury knows this, and he knows that Aeneas will follow the will of the gods (to found Rome), even if it means he must leave his own true love behind him. (We don't worry overmuch about this; we know that Dido is only a comma between Creusa and Lavinia).But Mercury takes care to call Aeneas uxorius (dominated by a woman) - since the gpd knows that will sting. This is a world where men care far more what other men think of them than whether women get hurt or not.


The Gospel was originally written anonymously and was only attributed by the Church Fathers to Luke, the companion of Paul, towards the end of the second century. However, there are strong reasons for believing that the gospel writer was not Luke, the companion of Paul. For this reason, 'Luke' the gospel writer (Luke the evangelist) should not be confused with Luke the companion of the apostle Paul.The same author wrote both the Gospel According to Lukeand Acts of the Apostles. Since Acts is believed to have been written early in the second century, then its author must have died some time afterwards, during the first part of the second century.Roman Catholic AnswerThis is from the Catholic Encyclopedia article: After St. Paul's martyrdom practically all that is known about him is contained in the ancient "Prefatio vel Argumentum Luc ", dating back to Julius Africanus, who was born about A.D. 165. This states that he was unmarried, that he wrote the Gospel, in Achaia, and that he died at the age of seventy-four in Bithynia(probably a copyist's error for B otia), filled with the Holy Ghost. Epiphanius has it that he preached in Dalmatia (where there is a tradition to that effect), Gallia (Galatia?), Italy, and Macedonia. As an Evangelist, he must have suffered much for the Faith, but it is controverted whether he actually died a martyr's death. St. Jerome writes of him (De Vir. III., vii). "Sepultus est Constantinopoli, ad quam urbem vigesimo Constantii anno, ossa ejus cum reliquiis Andre Apostoli translata sunt [de Achaia?]."so we do not know the date, as we do not know anything about his early life, much less his birthdate.



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