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Answered 2010-01-21 04:24:45

No, as he has no legal rights to the child even if he sign the certificate himself. You will need to file for custody. see links below.

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Even if the father's name is on the birth certificate, and is living with the mother, except in Arizona.


If the father signed the birth certificate, then the mother will have to go to family court to obtain sole custody of the child, whether or not the case will be contested.




Yes, the birth certificate will not give him custody. The father have to prove paternity in court with a DNA test and he can then petition for visitation or custody. Then he can also pay child support.


Only if unmarried to the father. Single mothers have sole custody in 49 states by default. This is regardless of whether she's living with the father or not. yes but if theres no legal paperwork then its whoever is holding the child


It matters if the father is named on the certificate as the father. If so, then he has as much rights as the mother. But in a court of law you might find the mother has a little more. Only if the mother has a problem will the father get custody. The law see's the mother as the one who the child should live with.


If his name is on the birth certificate he is the legal parent along with the mother. If they have split up she can go to court and ask for custody.


The father would be the favored person to get legal custody if the mother had custody and died unless he was found to be unfit to have custody.


In most states, the biological mother receives presumptive custody unless and until modified by court order.


The mother has sole custody if the parents are not married and there are no court orders regarding custody. A father who wishes to have parental rights must have his paternity established through the court.





he has the right to fight for custody of the child involved but in the end depending on the situation the mother would be granted soul custody unless the mother is less fit than the father to raise the child


That answer depends on several factors including the mother's age, ability to provide for the child and the environment where the child will be living. If a father is named on the birth certificate or parentage established after the fact in a court of law, the father has as many rights as the mother in terms of custody and support. Under Connecticut law, an unwed mother with no father legally designated is presumed to have sole custody unless proven otherwise or amended by other conditions as outlined above.


No, but the father can get the custody if he proves that the mother has bad habits like alcoholic or consume drugs.


Having one's signature on the birth certificate is a good first step, but it will not automatically give custody to that man. The court will look at all of the circumstances of the case.


That would be called joint custody and can be a good arrangement if it can be accomplished.


Yes, unless there is a custody agreement in order. Neither mother or father has custody legally.


Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.


NO, HE WOULD FIRST HAVE TO ESTABLISH PATERNITY AND PROVEN TO BE THE FATHER. THEN HE WOULD HAVE TO PROVE THE MOTHER WAS UNFIT TO KEEP THE CHILD.


I believe that the Mother should always have full Custody.. After the father is a convicted felon


Can a father in wi. get temporary full custody if mother is homeless?



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