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Answered 2009-01-26 18:51:29

If the parents have never married and live separately with their own parents, a court would need to decide on custody. Typically, the court will place the child with the mother, but the best interests of the child are primary.

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Only with permission of both parents. Your marriage to the father with joint custody does not automatically confer parental rights including access to medical records without written permission from both parents in cases of joint custody and may not even apply if the father had full legal and physical custody. This is federal law (HIPAA). If you were to legally adopt the child, those rights were be conferred by virtue of the adoption.


Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.


Generally, the person who has legal custody or legal guardianship of the child has right to the child's medical records. A parent who does not have legal custody is not entitled to the child's medical records. Generally, they would need a court order to obtain them.Generally, the person who has legal custody or legal guardianship of the child has right to the child's medical records. A parent who does not have legal custody is not entitled to the child's medical records. Generally, they would need a court order to obtain them.Generally, the person who has legal custody or legal guardianship of the child has right to the child's medical records. A parent who does not have legal custody is not entitled to the child's medical records. Generally, they would need a court order to obtain them.Generally, the person who has legal custody or legal guardianship of the child has right to the child's medical records. A parent who does not have legal custody is not entitled to the child's medical records. Generally, they would need a court order to obtain them.


Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.Generally, A "presumed father" has no legal custody unless he is married to the mother at the time of the child's birth. If the parent's are both married to each other they each have custody.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.Generally, A "presumed father" has no legal custody unless he is married to the mother at the time of the child's birth. If the parent's are both married to each other they each have custody.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.Generally, A "presumed father" has no legal custody unless he is married to the mother at the time of the child's birth. If the parent's are both married to each other they each have custody.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.Generally, A "presumed father" has no legal custody unless he is married to the mother at the time of the child's birth. If the parent's are both married to each other they each have custody.


I doubt they can TAKE custody. You might want to consider sharing custody until you are out of college and on your feet. Don't worry about your parents. They got you this far, didn't they?


Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.


Howard W. Woodruff has written: 'The marriage records of cass (Van Buren) County, Missouri' -- subject(s): Marriage records, Genealogy 'John Wagner and his twelve children of Harrison County, Ohio and surrounding counties, 1776-1984' -- subject(s): Family, Genealogy 'Marriage records, Perry County, Missouri, Book \\' -- subject(s): Marriage records, Genealogy 'Marriage records, St. Francois County, Missouri' -- subject(s): Marriage records, Genealogy 'Marriage records, Franklin County, Missouri' -- subject(s): Marriage records, Genealogy 'Marriage records, Crawford County, Missouri' -- subject(s): Marriage records, Genealogy 'Marriage records, Osage County, Missouri, book \\' -- subject(s): Marriage records, Genealogy 'Marriage records, Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri, book \\' -- subject(s): Marriage records, Genealogy 'Marriage records, Greene County, Missouri, Book A and B, 1833-1860' -- subject(s): Marriage records, Genealogy


Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.


If the parents are married they have equal parental rights. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity legally. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.


If the parents are married they have equal parental rights. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.


An unmarried father must establish his paternity and arrange for a custody hearing if he wants custody. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he must establish his paternity by signing the birth certificate at the time of birth (waiving DNA testing rights) which must be done with mother's consent. If he doesn't sign the birth certificate then he must seek another way to establish his paternity and that is done through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity has been established the father can request visitations, joint custody, full custody or the court will set up a schedule of regular child support payments for the child if she is to remain in the custody of her mother.


By default, the mother does. However, other custody arrangements can be made if the parents agree or if it is in the best interest of the child.An unmarried father must establish his paternity and arrange for a custody hearing if he wants custody. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he must establish his paternity by signing the birth certificate at the time of birth (waiving DNA testing rights) which must be done with mother's consent. If he doesn't sign the birth certificate then he must seek another way to establish his paternity and that is done through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity has been established the father can request visitations, joint custody, full custody or the court will set up a schedule of regular child support payments for the child if she is to remain in the custody of her mother.


Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.


The mother has sole custody and control in 49 states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he must seek other means of establishing his paternity and that is done through paternity test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court and once established the father can request visitations, custody and set up child support for the child.



Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.


This is not legal advice. For legal advice relevant to your particular situation please consult a qualified local attorney. Custody and Placement are two different things entirely. Simply put, placement merely refers to the place where the child resides. Custody is the legal right and obligation to the oversight of the child. Joint custody means that both parents have rights to the child (access to medical records, etc.)


when joint custody is in place both parents have the same rights. unless stipulated in court records. Joint means both so when ever the other parent is suppose to have visitation with the child the child / children must go. review documents that grant Joint custody.


It is assumed the parents are unmarried. He has no legal rights until he establishes his paternity.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test.A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.It is assumed the parents are unmarried. He has no legal rights until he establishes his paternity.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test.A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.It is assumed the parents are unmarried. He has no legal rights until he establishes his paternity.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test.A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.It is assumed the parents are unmarried. He has no legal rights until he establishes his paternity.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test.A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.


You do not need those records to get married in Mexico but you can call your state vital records office to check on that.


An unmarried father must establish his paternity and arrange for a custody hearing if he wants custody. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he must establish his paternity by signing the birth certificate at the time of birth (waiving DNA testing rights) which must be done with mother's consent. If he doesn't sign the birth certificate then he must seek another way to establish his paternity and that is done through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity has been established the father can request visitations, joint custody, full custody or the court will set up a schedule of regular child support payments for the child if she is to remain in the custody of her mother. The court will schedule a hearing and issue an order that is in the best interest of the child.


An unmarried father must establish his paternity and arrange for a custody hearing if he wants custody. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he must establish his paternity by signing the birth certificate at the time of birth (waiving DNA testing rights) which must be done with mother's consent. If he doesn't sign the birth certificate then he must seek another way to establish his paternity and that is done through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity has been established the father can request visitations, joint custody, full custody or the court will set up a schedule of regular child support payments for the child if she is to remain in the custody of her mother. The court will schedule a hearing and issue an order that is in the best interest of the child.


Elizabeth Prather Ellsberry has written: 'Index to biographies of Chariton County, Missouri' 'Early Livingston County, Missouri' -- subject(s): Deeds 'Macon County, Missouri' -- subject(s): Registers of births, Wills 'Marriage records of Daviess County, Missouri, 1836-1855' -- subject(s): Genealogy, Marriage licenses 'Marriage records of Sullivan County, Missouri' -- subject(s): Genealogy, Marriage licenses, Registers of births 'Marriage records, 1816-1850, and will records, 1818-1836, of Howard County, Missouri' -- subject(s): Marriage licenses, Wills 'Wright County, Missouri' -- subject(s): Marriage licenses, Wills 'Cemetery records of Livingston County, Missouri' -- subject(s): Cemeteries, Genealogy, Inscriptions, Registers of births 'Index to biographies of Caldwell county, Missouri' 'Douglas County, Missouri: marriage records, 1866-1889; will records, 1886-1910' 'Marriage records of Grundy County, Missouri, 1841-1864' -- subject(s): Genealogy, Marriage licenses 'Putnam County, Missouri, records' '1860 federal census for St. Francois County, Missouri' -- subject(s): Census, 1860, Census, 8th, 1860, Genealogy, Registers of births


United StatesNo. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.United StatesNo. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.United StatesNo. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.United StatesNo. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.


It will be assumed the parent are not married since married parents have equal parental rights. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he must establish his paternity by signing the birth certificate at the time of birth (waiving DNA testing rights) which must be done with mother's consent. If he doesn't sign the birth certificate then he must seek another way to establish his paternity and that is done through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.



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