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Nuclear Reactors

The fuel used in an atomic reactor is?

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2012-06-09 09:45:43
2012-06-09 09:45:43

Most water moderated reactors use yellowcake powder: a uranium oxide enriched to 3% uranium-235. A few reactors use metallic uranium, sometimes enriched past 20%. Some experimental reactors use plutonium or mixed uranium & plutonium.

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uranium-235 your welcome :)



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The waste from nuclear reactors can in principle be reprocessed to extract plutonium, which can be used to fuel nuclear reactors. But this is not "renewable" it is just recycling fuel the reactor made, this process can at best multiply the amount available reactor fuel by roughly 100 times, then we run out. Only France reprocesses their nuclear waste, other countries have abandoned it largely from the unjustified fear that reprocessed plutonium reactor fuel might be "stolen" to build atomic bombs (normal power reactor generated plutonium has very high levels of the undesired plutonium-240 and plutonium-241 which make it impossible to build working atomic bombs with that plutonium).


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The essential installation is the nuclear reactor.


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Uranium which is a fuel is used in atomic bombs and in nuclear power stations.


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The number of fuel pins in a reactor will vary depending on its design and objectives. In one reactor that I worked with, I seem to recall 137 fuel assemblies, with four bundles each, with 62 fuel pins each. That translates to 33,976 fuel pins in the reactor, each about 12 feet long.


No, Enriched Uranium-235 is used in a nuclear reactor as the fuel in the fuel rods and boron is used in the control rods.


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