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What are three causes of the Great Schism in Christianity?

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Some reasons for the Great Schism in the Christianity include:disagreement as to who is the head of the church, the Pope or Jesus?differences in the way in which religious rites were administeredCatholic Church spoke Latin, the Greek Orthodox spoke Greek


What caused this division was human belief in different things. Second there was also a language problem between Latin and Greek and the issue of disunity in the roman empire.


The Great Schism which was the period of the Church at the end of the 14th century, beginning of the 15th century, when there were two claimants to the papal throne, and, at one point, three, affected all of Christianity. It weakened the papacy, and eventually resulted in the protestant revolt a century later


The first schism was geographic, the Coptic Christian church sort of set up and kept going on its own (the Christians of Ethiopia). The send schism occurred when the Roman empire was divided and the Roman and Byzantine churches were formed. The third schism (the Protestant reformation) occurred because the Catholic church (in Rome) was so corrupt. We are currently likely to see a forth schism in the Anglican (protestant) communion in relation to the appointment of women and gay bishops.


Yes, these events are known as the Great Schism when the Roman Catholic church broke off The Orthodox Church.Roman Catholic AnswerIn the Catholic Church, the "Great Schism" usually refers to the Western schism when there were two, sometimes, three claimants to the papal throne. The pope had moved to Avignon, in France; another Pope was elected in Rome. This went on from 1378 until 1417. The Schism of the East in 1054 was between the Catholic Church and what is now called the Orthodox Church, is sometimes now in popular cultures as "the Great Schism". But, as I said, it is confusing as that technically refers to the Schism of the West not the East.


The three great religions are Christianity, Islamic and Judaism


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Roman Catholic AnswerIn the Catholic Church, the Great Schism usually refers to the Western Schism in the 14th century when there were two, sometimes three claimants to the papal throne. Protestants often refer to the Schism of the East as the Great Schism, this was in the 11th century when the Eastern Churches all split in two, half becoming Orthodox, and half staying with Rome. The protestant revolt was not a schism at all, but the heart breaking scene of people actually leaving the Church completely to form their own religion.


Roman Catholic AnswerThere were two "schisms" that are commonly referred to when speaking of the church. The Western Schism or Great Schism was not a true schism but refers to the time in the late 14 century when the Pope moved to Avignon and another pseudo-Pope was elected in Rome; at one time, before the end of this disaster there were three "popes". The Schism of the East, which was a true schism, resulted in the Orthodox Church separating from the Catholic Church in 1054. This schism has been an off again, on again thing through the centuries and is a great heartbreak for the Church.


The three great monotheistic religions are Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.Any three of the following:ZoroastrianismJudaismChristianityIslamSikhism


Islam, Judaism and Christianity.


It was between The Orthodox Church and The Roman Catholic Church.It was at this point when Pope and Patriarch excommunicated each other and were on the verge of war.Roman Catholic AnswerIn the Catholic Church, the "Great Schism" usually refers to the Western schism when there were two, sometimes, three claimants to the papal throne. The pope had moved to Avignon, in France; another Pope was elected in Rome. This went on from 1378 until 1417. The Schism of the East in 1054 was between the Catholic Church and what is now called the Orthodox Church, is sometimes now in popular cultures as "the Great Schism". But, as I said, it is confusing as that technically refers to the Schism of the West not the East.


The Crusaders became the military arm of the Church, and used force to restore Christianity. The Papacy suffered badly over the Crusades, as did all Christendom.The Babylonian Captivity was the moving of the Papacy to Avignon in France from 1305 - 1378. This split the Church and divided the leadership as there were two Popes at the same time. The illegitimate or unrecognised Pope is called an Antipope. This lead to schism.The Great Schism (sometimes called the Western Schism related to the Popes in Avignon and the Popes in Rome. By its end, three men simultaneously claimed to be the true pope. Driven by politics rather than any real theological disagreement, the schism was ended by the Council of Constance (1414-1418). The simultaneous claims to the papal chair of three different men hurt the reputation of the office.


When the schism came to a close, near the time of the Council of Constantine, three popes where vying for the official position: Gregory XII- Roman Catholic Church Benedict XIII- French Catholic Church John XXIII- German Catholic Church


The only two examples in the Catholic Church are the Great Schism in the fourteenth century when there were two claimants to the papacy, and at one time, three. And earlier in the eleventh century when the Schism of the East occurred and the Eastern Orthodox Church split from the authority of the Pope. Some might include the protestant revolt, but as these people left the Church and did not retain valid Orders or Sacraments (saving baptism in some cases), it is not properly a schism.


No, Patriarch Michael I still lead The Orthodox Church during the Great Schism.Pope Leo IX still led the Roman Catholic Church, but it was at this point when he tried to bring The Orthodox Church under his control.Roman Catholic AnswerIn the Catholic Church, the "Great Schism" usually refers to the Western schism when there were two, sometimes, three claimants to the papal throne. The pope had moved to Avignon, in France; another Pope was elected in Rome. This went on from 1378 until 1417. The Schism of the East in 1054 was between the Catholic Church and what is now called the Orthodox Church, is sometimes now in popular cultures as "the Great Schism". But, as I said, it is confusing as that technically refers to the Schism of the West not the East.


Roman Catholic AnswerThere is no "the Schism", A schism is any person or group who leaves the Church setting up their own Church. For it to be a true schism the person leaves the Church by refusing to submit to the authority of the pope or to hold communion with members of the Church subject to him. A person or group guilty of schism usually ends up in apostasy and heresy, but they are not the same. None of the above can receive the Sacraments and the conditions for absolution are the same for all three. Groups that are in schism from the Church are the Polish National Catholics, the Old Catholics, and the Orthodox Churches. These Churches all maintain valid Orders, and have valid sacraments. The Society of St. Pius X, as of spring 2012, is headed in that direction. Groups that when into schism and immediately lapsed into apostasy and heresy were the protestant of the first generation. Their descendants are not in schism as they did not maintain a true Church with valid Orders and Sacraments. The Great Schism, in the Catholic Church usually refers to the 14th century when there were claimants to the papal throne living in Avignon. Protestants and secular scholars usually refer to the Eastern Schism as the Great Schism, which would probably be more accurate, but is not commonly terminology in the Church, where it is always referred to as the Schism of the East.


A:The Great Schism of 1054, referred to by the Catholic Church as the Schism of the East, resulted in a permanent split in the Christian Church. The Catholic Church teaches that Patriarch Michael I was at fault, while the Orthodox Churches say that Pope Leo IX was at fault. Regardless of so-called fault, there is no real evidence that the Schism did long term harm to Christianity. The two parts of Catholic-Orthodox Christianity always had different ideas of Christian worship and even celebrated Easter at different times of the year. So we should not look for "fault" in the Great Schism, when it may have been inevitable.The underlying issue really concerned the relative authority of two very obstinate men. Because the Council of Nicaea decided that Christianity in the Roman Empire would be led by four senior bishops or Metropolitans representing Rome, Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem, with provision for Constantinople and Carthage (where Metropolitans were subsequently appointed), the mainly Greek-speaking eastern regions held that the bishop of Rome was one among equals. However, the bishop of Rome, designated in the West as the Pope, insisted that he had greater authority than the other Metropolitans. Gradually, differences built up until, in 1054, Pope Leo IX insisted on the right to make a change to the Nicene Creed, on his own and apart from an Ecumenical Council. The Great Schism resulted when legates from Pope Leo IX and Patriarch Michael I excommunicated each other.When Pope Leo IX authorised his emissaries to excommunicate Patriarch Michael I, he believed that his action would at long last establish the bishop of Rome as the supreme leader of the Church. Michael was only unable to excommunicate Leo because the western pontiff had already died, but when he excommunicated the emissaries, he did not realise that the two actions would lead to the Great Schism. Because neither side would compromise, the Church was set on the path to a permanent schism, known as the Great Schism..AnswerHistorically, in the Catholic Church, the Great Schism refers to the 15th century when there were up to three claimants to the Papal Throne, also known as the Schism of the West. Protestant and secular historians usually refer to the Schism of the East as the Great Schism, which occurred in the eleventh century. In both of the schisms, the fault lay in individual's sin, mostly the sin of pride. In the Western Schism, it was national pride of European nations, in the Eastern Schism, it was national pride of some Eastern patriarchs.


The three great monotheistic religions of the world are Judaism, Christianity and Islam.


In 1054 AD the Christian Church was split into 2.Catholic AnswerYou are asking two different questions if you are asking about the Great Schism of 1054 as the Great Schism happened in the 14th century, the Schism in the 11th century is called the Schism of the East, so below are the two answers: .The Great Schism was not really a schism, it is often confused with the Schism of the East when the Orthodox Church split from Rome back in the eleventh century. In the fourteenth century, the pope moved to Avignon in France, an antipope was elected in Rome, and finally we ended up with three claimants to the papal throne. After the Great Schism was healed, the Holy Father returned to Rome and stayed there. I believe that the papacy lost some of its temporal prestige over the entire incident.from A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957The Great Schism, otherwise know as the Schism of the West was not strictly a schism at all but a conflict between the two parties within the Church each claiming to support the true pope. Three months after the election of Urban VI, in 1378, the fifteen electing cardinals declared that they had appointed him only as a temporary vicar and that in any case the election was invalid as made under fear of violence from the Roman mob..Catholic AnswerThe result of the Eastern Schism was the establishment of the Orthodox Churches apart from Rome, or as the Holy Father said of it, "we are only breathing on one lung." When the Orthodox split from the Church, each of them split down the middle so that half stayed with Rome, and half started the Orthodox Church, thus there is a Greek Orthodox Church, and a Greek Uniate Rite within the Catholic Church, and so on for each of the rites and Churches.


The 3 main religions are christianity, islam, and hinduism.


The three causes of the great depression were stock market, bank failures and reduction in purchasing by people and companies. The stock market happened in 1929.


The three major Monotheistic Religions are: 1. Christianity 2. Islam 3. Judaism


The schism split the Catholic Church into the Western and Eastern Churches, weakening the Church and is a great division of Christianity.Roman Catholic AnswerThere is some problem with this as many people seem to use the phrase "Great Schism" for what the Catholic Church and the encyclopedia call the Schism of the East. The Great Schism historically refers to the Schism of the West which was not actually a schism: from A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957The Great Schism, otherwise know as the Schism of the West was not strictly a schism at all but a conflict between the two parties within the Church each claiming to support the true pope. Three months after the election of Urban VI, in 1378, the fifteen electing cardinals declared that they had appointed him only as a temporary vicar and that in any case the election was invalid as made under fear of violence from the Roman mob. Urban retorted by naming twenty-eight new cardinals, and the others at once proceeded to elect Cardinal Robert of Geneva as Pope Clement VII, who went to reside at Avignon. The quarrel was in its origin not a theological or religious one, but was caused by the ambition and jealousy of French influence, which was supported to some extent for political reasons by Spain, Naples, Provence, and Scotland; England, Germany, Scandinavia, Wales, Ireland, Portugal, Flanders and Hungary stood by what they believe to be the true pope at Rome. The Church was torn from top to bottom by the schism, both sides in good faith (it was impossible to know to whom allegiance was due), which lasted with its two lines of popes (and at one time three) till the election of Martin V in 1417. It is now regarded as practically certain that the Urbanist popes were the true ones and their names are included in semi-official lists; moreover, the ordinal numbers of the Clementine claimants (who, however, are not called anti-popes,) were adopted by subsequent popes of the same name.


There are 4: Judaism Christianity Islam Bahá'í Faith



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