Charles Dickens
A Christmas Carol

What does scrooge mean when he says the case of this unhappy man might be my own?

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2016-12-21 11:58:45
2016-12-21 11:58:45

SCooge is comparing the story he sees before him with his own life. It is of course exactly that

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In the beginning, Scrooge was mean, a lover of money, lonely, selfish, bitter, unhappy and uncaring toward others.


old scrooge is mean young scrooge is nice


Normally, It means that they are unhappy or disappointed with you. It could also mean that they don't know how to get in touch with you but that rarely is the case.


Without more context being supplied it is difficult to say (i.e.: WHERE are you getting this disposition from, and in response to WHAT?)It might mean that a check shows that you have a clear criminal history record.It might mean that a Grand Jury did not hand down an indictment.It might mean the case against you was Nolle Prosse'd.It might mean the the case was Dismissed withPrejudice.It might mean that your case was successfully expunged.


Scrooge is a term used to refer to mean people or misers. It comes from the Charles Dickens character of Ebenezer Scrooge from the book: A Christmas Carol.


I think we might have borrowed the slang "it sucks" from somebody else. It is usually interpeted to mean that, "I am unhappy about the situation", or "it is unfair".


Unhappy means not happy, down, sad, depressed, or angry.


Scrooge was tight fisted mean and he loved money


You are probably hungry, or have an unhappy memory that has happend in the past that might affect you.


Do you mean kanjus? That means scrooge.


The prefix un- means not, so unhappy means not happy. :D


I don't mean to scare you but it might be a sign of psoriasis or inflammatory arthritis. But don't worry! If you do have this this might not be the case!


If one thinks some thing is nonsense or not true you could call it humbug. In the case of scrooge it means "Its all just nonsense".


The name of the grumpy man might have been Grumpy or could have been Scrooge. A grumpy person might also be called grouchy or irritable or even just mean.


It means you are unhappy with something


miserable means unhappy


Unhappy to the point of anger.


anger, aggravated, unhappy


"The judge kill its case" could mean the judge ruled in a way that it harmed the case in a way that it could not be won. It might also mean the judge dismissed the case.


Might be sick. Take it to the vet just in case.


The context makes a difference, as is the case with so many English words. Unindicated might mean unsupported as a course of action or medical treatment, it might mean not required, it might simply mean that evidence of a thing is not present.


Dickens just wanted to make Scrooge a mean person to make the book and the character more interesting .


Because Scrooge gives him bob a raise and now the family was mean to Scrooge no nice,


The term is used to refer to a person who is miserly or stingie. Originally the last name of Charles Dickens famous character Ebenezer Scrooge


It could mean many possible things depending on the court system in question. In my experience a "flag" refers to a quick means of identification of the "status" of the case by means of the color of the case folder or the color of a memo attached to the case jacket (i.e.: a "flag"). For instance: a red jacket (or "flag") might mean an "open/active case - a blue memo slip (or "flag") might stand for a closed case, or a green case file (or "flag") might mean a closed case. These quick codes/flags relieve the necessity of having to open each case jacket and reading the contents to determine the status of the case it contains. Of course, this phrase might mean something entirely different in another court system.



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