Repossession

What if you block your sons car that is being reposed can the repossession company move your car to get the wanted car?

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2009-08-31 17:34:02
2009-08-31 17:34:02

They have no legal jurisdiction over any vehicle not listed on the repo order. They can no more touch your car as they could the presidents limo. Tom Brode

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The LENDER is responsible for every detail of a repossession. They may pass the costs of repair on to the repo company.


The tow/repossession company has to notify the police of the repossession so the car can't be reported stolen..


You can tell if a car is reposed by seeing if it is just sitting there. Reposed just means: The act of resting or the state of being at rest.



You being arrested has no bearing on your loan. As long as you make the payments on time there will be no repossession. The loan company does not care if you are in jail as long as they get their money.



Repossession companies must give you the opportunity to recover your personal belongings. That being said, they need not do so at the time of repossession. If they store your property for any length of time, the may charge a storage fee. They are not required to hold your property indefinitely either. If you make no attempt to recover you belongings, the repossession company will dispose of it after 30-45 days.


Not everyone likes company, at least not unless company is wanted.


The order of repossession is their authorization to enter the car. If your car is being repossessed, it means there's a lien on it, and the lienholder called for the repossession to be carried out. You don't own the car - the lienholder does, until you pay off the lienholder and they relinquish the title to you. So yes, that tow company doing the repossession has every right to enter the vehicle they're repossessing.


Are you really that desperate to be a snitch? I mean, it's a matter between the lessee and the agencies seeking to repossess the vehicle (those being the finance company and the recovery agents). It's none of your business, and the best thing for you to do is to just stay out of it. If they're halfway competent repossession agents, they'll get to the car. If all else fails, the finance company - being the actual owner of the vehicle - has legal options at their disposal. Your intervention is neither wanted nor required, and I'm saying this as someone who has been in the repossession business.


Typically when it comes to car repossession, a customer has to worry about their car being taken when they have missed three payments. Sometimes repossession can be held off by just contacting the company and reassuring them they will get their money.


After a repossession, you will need to pay a fine usually. For example, if this was a car being repossessed, you would have to pay a certain amount to get it back.


Answering this with common sense, contact the repossession company. You probably got some form of communication telling you your car was being repoed. Try looking at letters and look for contact information. You can also look through your local phone book to see which companies do repossession work in your area. You could also contact your original loan company because usually lienholders have contracts with repossession companies to repo their cars from people should they default on their loans.


They can only take whatever it is they have an order of repossession for - if the trailer is not included in their order of repossession, they cannot take it.


No you can not "legally" hide a vehcile being sought for repossession. In most states you can be charged with a felony for hiding one.


Being in the military is not bar to repossession of a vehicle


Repossession can happen any time after a payment goes late; it all depends what the initial contract states.


Depending on the state you reside in the procedure in order to get a repossession stopped is difficult. One of the few ways to stop a repossession is if a "breach of the peace" were to take place such as your car being in a locked garage or a threat of force was issued.


Federal and states laws do not allow repossession agents move a vehicle that may be blocking in a wanted vehicle without the permission of that vehicle's owner. That being said, most agents will not hook a blocking vehicle to move it for liability reasons. That being said, there are exceptions to every rule, and there are some less scrupulous repossession agents who will do whatever they deem necessary to get a wanted vehicle. These are the exception and not the rule.Here's the thing: if an agent has moved a vehicle that you had blocking in another that was up for repossession, contact your states bureau of licensing and report them. You might also report it to your local law enforcement agency. Additionally, consider that blocking a wanted vehicle to prevent repossession could be a felony in your state; this is called Hindering a Lender, and may be prosecuted like Auto Theft.Another thing to consider is that the sole purpose of the job of a repossession agent is to recover vehicles up for repossession. Blocking in a wanted vehicle makes his job more difficult. Now think about how you respond if someone makes the job you do more difficult. Repossession agents, most of them, are very good at their jobs, and very motivated; if they do not recover, they do not get paid. Now think about where the most inconvenient place would be to have your vehicle repossessed. Church? School? The Winn Dixie as you walk out with melting ice cream and your screaming progeny to see your car being towed away behind the repo truck as the driver waves at you? Make it easy on yourself.


Get yourself a business license and some clients.


Sue them both, plus the driver, plus their respective insurance companies, and let the court find them "jointly and severally liable," so you don't care which one of them actually has to pay.


Because the lender repossessed the car from where ever it was after being totaled.IF you had gotten the car back after it was totaled, it couldn't have been a repossession.


Be Human Being. There are no formal laws or requirements regulating that state as of yet.


The majority of states allow for a repossession as long as there is no "breach of the peace." There are a few states that require a Right to Cure letter being sent out roughly 20 days prior to a repossession. You need to check your state law.


A MANAGEMENT REPRESENTATION LETTER is signed the management of the company being audited. An AUDIT ENGAGEMENT LETTER is signed by both an offical from the auditing firm and the management of the company being audited. (Nt exactly sure which one you wanted.)



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