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"In any case I understood nothing there. Bye!" is a literal English equivalent of the Italian phrase Non c'ho capito niente comunque. Ciao! The adverb, elided adverb and present perfect auxiliary, past participle, adverbs, and greeting model a feature of colloquial, conversational, friendly, informal Italian whereby the adverb/pronoun ci assumes a host of meanings, here as "there" in the sense of "in all of this." The pronunciation will be "non tcho ka-PEA-to NYEN-ey ko-MOON-kwey tchow" in Italian.

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8y ago
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13y ago

'Hello, but what did you [or 'he' or 'she'] say?'is an English equivalent of 'Ciao, ma cosa ha detto?'

The interjection 'ciao' means 'hello' and 'goodbye'. The conjunction 'ma' means 'but'. The feminine noun 'cosa' means 'thing, what'. The auxiliary 'ha' means '[he/she/it] has, [you] have'. The past participle of the infinitive 'dire', 'detto' means 'said'.

All together, they're pronounced 'tchow* mah KOH-sah-DEHT-toh'.

*The sound 'ow' is similar to that in the English noun 'chow'.

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14y ago

I don't understand is an English equivalent of 'Non capisco'. The adverb 'non' means 'not'. The verb 'capisco' means '[I] am understanding, do understand, understand'. Together, they're pronounced 'non kah-PEE-skoh'.

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9y ago

"I don't know it" is a literal English equivalent of the Italian phrase Non lo so. The negative, object pronoun, and first person singular of the present indicative also may be rendered into English simply as "I don't know." The pronunciation will be exactly the way it looks in Italian.

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14y ago

"I don't understand" is a literal English equivalent of the Italian phrase Non capisco. The negative declarative statement may be preceded by the subject pronoun io ("I") for emphasis even though its use is not mandatory, what with context and verb endings identifying the first person singular as speaker. The pronunciation will be "non ka-PEA-sko" in Italian.

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Q: What is 'Non c'ho capito niente comunque Ciao' when translated from Italian to English?
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What is 'understood' when translated from English to Italian?

"Understood" in English is Capito in Italian.


What is 'Got it' when translated from English to Italian?

"Got it!" in English is Ho capito! in Italian.


What is 'Ho capito che ti amo' when translated from Italian to English?

Ho capito che ti amo in Italian means "I understood that I love you" in English.


What is 'I have read and understood' when translated from English to Italian?

Ho letto e capito


What is 'capito' when translated from Italian to English?

"Understood!" is a literal English equivalent of the Italian word Capito! The masculine singular past participle in question translates also into English as "Clenched!and "Got it!" according to context. But regardless of meaning or use as an affirmative or interrogative, the pronunciation will be "ka-PEA-to" in Italian.


What is 'I got it' when translated from English to Italian?

capito is the translation in Italian Language. It is the fifth most taught language. It has more than 65 million native speakers.


What is Italian word for understand?

Capito or Capisco


What is 'You got that right' when translated from English to Italian?

Hai capito bene! or Hai fatto bene! in the singular "you" and Avete capito bene! or Avete fatto bene! in the plural "you all" are Italian equivalents of the English phrase "You got that right!" Context makes clear whether correctly comprehending (cases 1, 3) or properly doing (examples 2, 4) something suits. The respective pronunciations will be "eye FAT-to BEH-ney" or "eye FAT-to BEH-ney" in the singular and "a-VEY-tey ka-PEA-to BEH-ney" or "a-VEY-tey FAT-to BEH-ney" in the plural in Pisan Italian.


What is the answer to the Italian question 'Capito'?

Capisco! and Sì, capito, sì! are answers to the Italian question Capito? The question means "Understood?" whereas the response translates as "Understood!" in the first-mentioned example and "Yes, understood, yes!" in the second. The respective pronunciations will be "ka-PEA-sko" and "see ka-PEA-to see" for the answers and "ka-PEA-to" for the query Italian.


What is 'Ho finito' when translated from Italian to English?

"I've understood" is an English equivalent of the Italian phrase Ho capito. The present indicative auxiliary and past participle also translate into English as "I have understood" and "I understood." The pronunciation will be "oh ka-PEA-to" in Italian.


What is 'You understand' when translated from English to Italian?

Non capisci is an Italian equivalent of 'You don't understand'. In the word by word translation, the adverb 'non' means 'not'. The verb 'capisci' means '[he/she/it] does understand, is understanding, understands'. It's pronounced 'nohn kah-PEE-shee'.That's the form that's used among the close circle of one's family and friends. Another form is used with an individual who's senior in age or position, or who isn't part of that close, familial and friendly circle. The form then becomes 'capisce', which means '[formal you] understand, [he/she/it] understands'. It's pronounced 'kah-PEE-shay'.


When was Wolfgang Capito born?

Wolfgang Capito was born in 1478.