Professional Liability Insurance

What is Professional Liability insurance and named insured?

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2011-12-09 07:12:12
2011-12-09 07:12:12

Professional Liability Insurance, sometimes called E&O insurance covers judgments, settlements and the costs of legal defense that may arise from the conduct of your profession or the professional services you provide to your clients.

The named insured is the professional who purchased the insurance policy.

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Related Questions


Professional Indemnity Insurance Malpractice Insurance Errors and Omissions Insurance


The "Professional",, would be the person or entity "Insured" under the contract.


A Loss payee on a Professional liability Malpractice Insurance Policy would be the injured party claiming loss or damages as a result of the actions or in-actions of the Named Insured Professional


The practicing professional or organization is generally the named insured. The coverage provides for legal defense and or mediation costs of the insured as well as liabilities and judgements for losses of a client that arise from the conduct of the defined profession, up to the specified limits.


Yes as long as the named insured is not a spouse, or if the spouse does not drive and does not have a drivers license the spouse can also be excluded.


Individual added to a life insurance policy other than the insured named in the policy. For example, an insured father can have a dependent son and daughter added to the policy as additional insureds. In many instances, adding an additional insured to an existing policy is less expensive than purchasing a separate policy for that insured. In property and liability insurance: another person, firm, or other entity enjoying the same protection as the named insured.


A named insured person can be an excluded driver on an automobile liability policy in New Mexico, if the policy holder wishes to remove a driver from the policy. The policy holder will have to notify the insurance company to make the changes.



Severability of Interest is also known as "Seperation of Insured." here's some ISO forms that mention it;General Liability Form CG 00 01 12 04 on page 12There's also mention of it under the Business Owners Coverage Form BP 00 03 01 06 page 41.*****Separation Of InsuredsExcept with respect to the Limits of Insurance of Section II -- Liability, and any rights or duties specifically assigned in this policy to the first Named Insured, this insurance applies:a. As if each Named Insured were the only Named Insured; andb. Separately to each insured against whom claim is made or "suit" is brought. *****


You have to be either named or you have to fit the definition of a named insured on the policy.



A homeowners insurance policy will cover the interests of the named insured on the policy. It does not matter if the insured is a student or not.


A Broad Form covers the named insured to drive any owned or non owned vehicles (subject to restrictions). For liability insurance, be it one or twenty cars - it's the same price.


No, a homeowner's policy lists both a named insured and an insured location.


Non Owners InsuranceNon Owners insurance - Auto Liability Insurance for Drivers who own no vehicle. It is also known as:1. Drivers Insurance2. Operators InsuranceNon Owners insurance is generally a Named Driver Policy Form (no other drivers are covered) and provides Secondary Auto Liability coverage along with other optional coverages.such as:1. Medical2. Uninsured / Under insured motorists3. Enhanced Personal LiabilityHappy Motoring


In many cases when you enter into a contract, whether it is a contract for work, a lease agreement or any other type of contract, there will be clauses covering insurance and indemnification, which is a fancy word for covering someone else's financial loss. Liability insurance provides money to cover losses to others due to negligence on the part of the insured. In this case, the insurance company is indemnifying the insured. If there is an indemnification clause in the contract then the contractor must indemnify the contractee as specified. This is most usually done by adding the contractee as either an additional insured (in the case of liability insurance) or as a loss payee (in the case of property insurance) to their existing policy. If the person entering the contract does not have insurance or does not have sufficient insurance, then those policies can usually be purchased. However, having the insurance or having the contractee named on your policy does not alleviate the indemnification.


Attorneys will often say there is no difference, when it comes to extending coverage for legal liability. However, depending the specific additional form used there might be substanial differences in the portion of the general liabilty policy that is extended to the named insured versus the additional insured. For instance, older additional insured forms (CG 2010 11/85) extended coverage to the additional insured for "Products/Completed Operations". New forms use wording such as "ongoing operations of the named insured" that limit coverage to the additional insured to the "Premise/Operations" portion of the CGL form. In addition, an additional insured generally has no right to: * Request policy endorsements or cancellation * Receive copies of the policy contract, other than the a/i form and a certificate of insurance The purpose of an additional insured is to protect the rights of another party that might become legally liable for the actions of the named insured. For instance, a landlord might become entangled in a lawsuit caused by the actions of his tenant. By naming the landlord as additional insured, the named insured extends coverage, especially defense costs, to the landlord. The tenant's insurance company would have to defend both the named insured and the additional insured. Additional insured's are a common and increasingly important part of liability insurance. It is important you make sure your agent is aware of the specific nature of the relationship you have with the additional insured, to ensure the proper additonal insured form is provided. I generally like to review my clients contracts - including leases - to make sure the policy and a/i form are compliant.


Comprehensive coverage is covers the interests of the named insured. A third party insurance policy will not cover you. It only covers the interests of that named third party insured.


Homeowners Insurance is specific to the named insured(s). It would only cover liability to the extent the named insured is somehow liable for the injury or bodily harm. Most accidental injuries are best addressed with the injured persons own medical insurance coverage.AnswerThey usually do not but every agreement is a unique one you have to go through yours with the fine print also.


If you are a first named insured on your policy then your liability coverage would extend to any non-owned private passenger vehicle you have permission to operate.


Auto Insurance follows the liabilities of the Named Insured(s). Sometimes that entails following the vehicle in the event a permitted driver fits the definitions of a named insured under the terms of the Auto Insurance Policy. Sometimes it entails following the Individual such as When we rent or borrow a car and our liability coverage follows us. Never Assume that Auto Insurance simply follows a car or vehicle. This is a misunderstanding that many people and even Insurance Agents fall prey too when their is a lack of comprehension.


No. your nanny is not a named insured on your home insurance policy.


No. "Renters Insurance" is property coverge for a tenant. It will cover the property of the named insured Tenant or Renter that is located within the rented dwelling. It will not cover property of someone who is not a named insured on the policy.


Liability insurance does not cover the property value of the rented equipment, but your liability insurance may cover damages resulting from claims of the use of the equipment. Example, you rent a forklift and accidently crash it into a truck you are loading. The truck owner sues you. The liability policy would probably cover the damage to the truck or any injuries caused during the accident, but would for sure not cover the damage to the forklift. Here are several opinions from FAQ Farmers: * Commercial General Liability insurance cannot cover equipment rental in the case where the insured has rented equipment. The 'exclusion j' under the coverage A states that "property owned, rented or occupied by the insured" is an exclusion under "Bodily injury and Property Damage Liability Coverage". Also, exclusion j also specifies that "property loaned to the named insured" is also excluded. * You are wrong...gl does cover the use of such equipment but does not cover if stolen, etc.


Auto insurance usually has several components. Not all coverages are purchased by every applicant, but the basic coverages are as follows: Liability insurance provides coverage to the named insured and others who are identified by name or by relationship to the named insured in the policy for negligent acts or omissions while operating the insured vehicle. Stated otherwise, if a covered person is legally liable for causing damage to another in the operation of the insured car, the insurer will pay those damages. Because the damages are payable to a third party, liability insurance is often referred to as "third-party coverage". Liability insurance may be for bodily injury or for property damage, and the policy will specify the amount of coverage that is available for each type of damage. Some policies of commercial auto insurance have "combined single limits", which meld bodily injury and property damage coverage into a total available limit. Medical Payments / Personal Injury Protection (PIP) is a form of "first party" coverage because it pays expenses incurred by the insured. Specifically, it pays a portion of the medical expenses and lost wages insured by the insured and others specified in the policy and/or by statute without regard to fault for the collision. The payments may be subject to a deductible. Under-insured / Uninsured (UM) is designed to compensate the named insured or others designated in the policy by name or by their relation to the insured, for bodily injury, and the effects thereof, if the at-fault party did not have bodily injury liability coverage. Because it effectively takes the place of the adverse party's liability coverage, the damages recoverable by the insured or other person to whom the coverage applies may be reduced or eliminated according to the rules of comparative or contributory negligence to which the jurisdiction adheres.



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