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What is a demultiplexer?

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2007-05-01 04:58:50
2007-05-01 04:58:50

See answer to "What is a multiplexer" as they are reciprocal functions.

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A demultiplexer is a circuit. It has one input but more than one output. A demultiplexer gives binary information from one end to another. It is used to connect a single source to many destinations.

A demultiplexer is an electronic device that separates a multiplex signal into its component parts. It is used when a circuit wishes to send a signal to one of many devices.

It's vantage, not disadvantage isn't it?

Demultiplexing, or separating several previously multiplexed signals.

45A demultiplexer is the opposite of a multiplexer. In electronic devices, a demultiplexer is a logical circuit which takes a single input and sends out this input to one of several outputs available. During this process the output that has been selected is assigned the value 1, while the other outputs are assigned the value 0. The definition is slightly different when we are talking about demultiplexers in the context of networking. In the networking context, a demultiplexer is a device that receives multiple signals that have been transmitted on one line and then decodes these single line signals into separate multiple signals. A demultiplexer is usually always used in tandem with a multiplexer. Demultiplexers can be analog demultiplexers or digital demultiplexers. Digital demultiplexers generally function as decoders.

A: Multiplexer sends gabs of information on one line the multiplexer decodes what is designed to select from the data

They find use in Clock demultiplexer,Security monitoring system,Synchronous data transmission system

A multiplexer takes many inputs and and selectively allow one output. A demultiiplexer is just the opposite function

synchronization between the multiplexer and demultiplexer is a major issue in data transmission. if the multiplexer and demultiplexer are out of synchronization a bit belonging to one channel may be received by the wrong channel. for dis reason , one or more synchronization bits are usually added to the beginning of each frame. these bits, called framing bit , follow a pattern, frame to frame, that allow the demultiplexer to syncronize with the incoming steam so that it can separate the time slots accurately. in most cases, this syncronization information consists of one bit

data coming from a single line and distribute it to multiple line . according to select lies or control lines. it is same as decoder with a enable signal.

A multiplexer, commonly referred as an input selector, is a circuit with many inputs but only one output: it has some data inputs, control inputs and one output, depending on the control inputs, one input from the data inputs is sent to the output .A demultiplexer is a circuit with one data input, few control inputs and many outputs, it is also known as output selector.

A multiplexor is a device that takes two or more signals and encodes them on fewer (often, on one) wire. A demultiplexor is a device that reverse that process.

According to DIGITAL electronics logic connection can be defined as the combination of gates to realised a particular logic function. e.g decoder; multiplexer; demultiplexer etc

It is necessary to synchronize the mutiplexer and demultiplexer in time division multiplexing because the multiplexor is encoding data onto the carrier at certain points in time. (This is why its called Time Division Multiplexing) The demultiplexor most know when the data of interest are present in the carrier, hence the need for synchronization. Note that there usually is a transmission delay between the multiplexor and demultiplexor. As a result, while the demultiplexor is in sync with the multiplexor, it is not necessarily in phase. The crucial point is that the data and clock be in sync and in phase at the demultiplexor.

multiplexer combines several individual signals into a single signal.demultiplexer separates a single signal into several individual signals.There are many types of multiplexing, a few are:time domain multiplexingfrequency domain multiplexingdigitally coded multiplexingetc.

A decoder takes n inputs and produces 2^n outputs. An encoder takes 2^n inputs and produces n outputs.A multiplexer selects one line from many lines. The inverse of selection is distribution. A demux essentially transmits data from one line line to 2^n possible output lines. The output line is determined by n select lines. In short, a multiplexer selects an input line, a demultiplexer selects an output line.The differences between these two circuits is subtle, as far as I can tell. A demux simply selects an output line, nothing more. It's a glorified switch. A decoder takes n inputs, and uses those inputs to determine which of the 2^n output lines is high. This is the difference, I think. A decoder is designed to simply keep one line high. A demux is designed to set one output equal to the input (whether it be high, low, or a changing signal).

In Electronic Communication, FDM stands for Frequency Division Multiplexing and TDM for Time Division Multiplexing. In FDM, several signals (each assigned different frequency) are fed into a mux (multiplexer) where they are all combined and fed into a main channel and transmitted. At the receiver end, demux(demultiplexer) splits each signal. So, in FDM we can transmit several signals at once. In TDM, several signals are fed into a mux but with different timing.

•Multiplexing means to break high-speed physical communication circuit into several lower-speed logical circuits so that many different devices can simultaneously use it. Multiplexing is a mechanism that allows multiple devices to share a single high-capacity link. The device which facilitates multiplexing is a multiplexer (MUX), which bundles the signals from the source nodes into the shared medium. On the other end, a demultiplexer (DEMUX), would split the bundled signal back to its intended nodes.

mohammed.eng.2005@gmail.com ---- The differences between these two circuits is subtle, as far as I can tell. A demux simply selects an output line, nothing more. It's a glorified switch. A decoder takes n inputs, and uses those inputs to determine which of the 2^n output lines is high. This is the difference, I think. A decoder is designed to simply keep one line high. A demux is designed to set one output equal to the input (whether it be high, low, or a changing signal).

Multiplexing is used to condense information. For instance, if you had four different telephone lines with their own numbers in a building but only had one pair of telephone wires to the building, you could connect all four telephones to a multiplexer and connect the multiplexer to the single line coming into the building. On the other end of the single telephone line (at the phone switching station, for instance) you would connect a demultiplexer which would decode the information and send it to four individual phone lines. Furthermore, any or all four lines could be used at the same time without bothering the other lines.

One is useful without the other. Data that is multiplexed at one end of a communication channel must be demultiplexed at the other end.One is useful without the other. Data that is multiplexed at one end of a communication channel must be demultiplexed at the other end.One is useful without the other. Data that is multiplexed at one end of a communication channel must be demultiplexed at the other end.One is useful without the other. Data that is multiplexed at one end of a communication channel must be demultiplexed at the other end.

A gate is a specific instantiation of a circuit that is intended to perform some boolean logic function.There are many other specific instantiations of a circuit that perform other functions unrelated to boolean logic (e.g. amplifier, oscillator, modulator, demodulator, mixer, converter, circulator, gyrator, tank, rectifier, voltage doubler, voltage trippler, voltage regulator, current regulator, power inverter, low pass filter, high pass filter, band pass filter, band reject filter, automatic gain control, automatic frequency control, phase locked loop, impedance matcher, clipper, limiter, operational amplifier, integrator, differentiator, multiplier, summation, logarithm, antilogarithm, voltage comparator, delay, debouncer, register, latch, multiplexer, demultiplexer, encoder, decoder, digital comparator, line driver, line receiver).A gate is one type of circuit, there are literally billions of different types of circuits

In telecommunications and computer networks, multiplexing(known as muxing) is a term used to refer to a process where multiple analog message signals or digital data streams are combined into one signal over a shared medium. The aim is to share an expensive resource. For example, in telecommunications, several phone calls may be transferred using one wire. The multiplexed signal is transmitted over a communication channel, which may be a physical transmission medium. The multiplexing divides the capacity of the low-level communication channel into several higher-level logical channels, one for each message signal or data stream to be transferred. A reverse process, known as demultiplexing, can extract the original channels on the receiver side. A device that performs the multiplexing is called a multiplexer (MUX), and a device that performs the reverse process is called a demultiplexer (DEMUX). Inverse multiplexing (IMUX) has the opposite aim as multiplexing, namely to break one data stream into several streams, transfer them simultaneously over several communication channels, and recreate the original data stream.

Strobe A B C D Output (Y) 0 0 0 0 0 D0 0 0 0 0 1 D1 0 0 0 1 0 D2 0 0 0 1 1 D3 0 0 1 0 0 D4 0 0 1 0 1 D5 0 0 1 1 0 D6 0 0 1 1 1 D7 0 1 0 0 0 D8 0 1 0 0 1 D9 0 1 0 1 0 D10 0 1 0 1 1 D11 0 1 1 0 0 D12 0 1 1 0 1 D13 0 1 1 1 0 D14 0 1 1 1 1 D15 1 X X X X 1 where A,B,C,D are the control input or control nibble and the Boolean expression for Y is given as:- Y = A'B'C'D'D0 + A'B'C'DD1 + A'B'CD' D2 + A'B'CDD3 + A'BC'D'D4 + A'BC'DD5+ A'BCD'D6 + A'BCDD7 + AB'C'D'D8 + AB'C'DD9 + AB'CD'D10 + AB'CDD11 + ABC'D'D12 + ABC'DD13 + ABCD'D14 + ABCDD15

For the computer to read the information as it only reads 1/0 which then brings you to binary.In both the multiplexer and the demultiplexer, part of the circuits decode the address inputs, i.e. it translates a binary number of n digits to 2n outputs, one of which (the one that corresponds to the value of the binary number) is 1 and the others of which are 0.It is sometimes advantageous to separate this function from the rest of the circuit, since it is useful in many other applications. Thus, we obtain a new combinatorial circuit that we call the decoder. It has the following truth table (for n = 3):a2 a1 a0 | d7 d6 d5 d4 d3 d2 d1 d0 ---------------------------------- 0 0 0 | 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 | 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 | 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 | 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 | 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 | 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 | 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 | 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0Here is the circuit diagram for the decoder:


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