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Answered 2012-09-14 12:29:51

Default Constructor will be called first . If you override Validate method , then validate method will be called .

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No. If you do not write a constructor for you classes, the default Object constructor can still be used.


There is no specific keyword for a constructor in C++. Simply define and declare a method of the class with the same name as the class and it will be a constructor. A constructor with no arguments is the default constructor, a constructor with one argument of class type is the copy constructor, and a constructor with one argument of some other type is the conversion constructor. You can provide other overloaded constructors if you want.


If you don't type a constructor into your class code, a default constructor will be automatically generated by the compiler. The default constructor is ALWAYS a no-arg constructor. (Obviously the compiler has no clue what all arguments you might want for your class. So it takes the safe way out with a no argument constructor)Determine Whether a Default Constructor Will Be CreatedThe following example shows a Lamborghini class with two constructors:class Lamborghini {Lamborghini() { }Lamborghini(String name) { }}Will the compiler put in a default constructor for the class above? "No!" What about for the following variation of the class?class Lamborghini {Lamborghini(String name) { }}Now will the compiler insert a default constructor? "No Again!" What about this class?class Lamborghini { }Now we're talking. The compiler will generate a default constructor for the preceding class, because the class doesn't have any constructors defined. OK, what about this one below?class Lamborghini {void Lamborghini() { }}You might be tempted to say that, the compiler won't create one, since there already is a constructor in the Lamborghini class? Take another look at the Lamborghini class.What's wrong with the Lamborghini() constructor? It isn't a constructor at all! It's simply a method that happens to have the same name as the class. Remember, the return type is a dead straight way to tell us that we're looking at a method, and not a constructor. So, here again the compiler will put the default no-arg constructor in the class.


You overload a constructor by declaring two or more constructors in a class, each with different signatures. When no constructor is specified, a default constructor and a copy constructor are implied. Both can be overridden. The default constructor can also be overloaded if all arguments are given default values in the declaration. You can add as many construction overloads as required in order to initialise your class. If your class has many members to initialise, it may be helpful to use a structure and an overloaded constructor to accept the structure. For every constructor that has exactly one argument, there should also be an equivalent assignment operator overload. The copy constructor assignment overload is implied if not specified.


A constructor is a method that is invoked when an object is created. As to being mandatory, that really depends on the programming language; in the case of Java, each class must have a constructor, however, in many cases Java will automatically provide a default constructor, so you don't really need to program it.


Determine Whether a Default Constructor Will Be CreatedThe following example shows a Lamborghini class with two constructors:class Lamborghini {Lamborghini() { }Lamborghini(String name) { }}Will the compiler put in a default constructor for the class above? "No!" What about for the following variation of the class?class Lamborghini {Lamborghini(String name) { }}Now will the compiler insert a default constructor? "No Again!" What about this class?class Lamborghini { }Now we're talking. The compiler will generate a default constructor for the preceding class, because the class doesn't have any constructors defined. OK, what about this one below?class Lamborghini {void Lamborghini() { }}You might be tempted to say that, the compiler won't create one, since there already is a constructor in the Lamborghini class? Take another look at the Lamborghini class.What's wrong with the Lamborghini() constructor? It isn't a constructor at all! It's simply a method that happens to have the same name as the class. Remember, the return type is a dead straight way to tell us that we're looking at a method, and not a constructor. So, here again the compiler will put the default no-arg constructor in the class.


The following example shows a Lamborghini class with two constructors: class Lamborghini { Lamborghini() { } Lamborghini(String name) { } } Will the compiler put in a default constructor for the class above? "No!" What about for the following variation of the class? class Lamborghini { Lamborghini(String name) { } } Now will the compiler insert a default constructor? "No Again!" What about this class? class Lamborghini { } Now we're talking. The compiler will generate a default constructor for the preceding class, because the class doesn't have any constructors defined. OK, what about this one below? class Lamborghini { void Lamborghini() { } } You might be tempted to say that, the compiler won't create one, since there already is a constructor in the Lamborghini class? Take another look at the Lamborghini class. What's wrong with the Lamborghini() constructor? It isn't a constructor at all! It's simply a method that happens to have the same name as the class. Remember, the return type is a dead straight way to tell us that we're looking at a method, and not a constructor. So, here again the compiler will put the default no-arg constructor in the class.


The main method is the method called when the Java application is started The constructor is called whenever a new object is instantiated.


A constructor is a special method that gets executed when the object is created.


A constructor is a class method which initialises an object of the class at the point of instantiation. Specifically, it initialises the base classes (if any) and the non-static data members (if any). Constructors also play a central role in the resource acquisition is initialisation (RAII) paradigm. Objects which have a natural default value have a default constructor. The default constructor is a constructor that has no arguments or where all arguments have default values. Objects which can be copied have a copy constructor. The copy constructor has just one non-default argument, a const l-value reference of the same type as the class. Objects which can be moved have a move constructor. The move constructor has just one non-default argument, a modifiable r-value reference of the same type as the class. All other constructors that have only one argument of a type other than the class itself are known as conversion constructors. Constructors can also have more than one argument. No specific name is given to these constructors. Other than physical memory constraints, there is no limit to the number of constructors that may be defined for a class.


1. The constructor has to have the same name as the classthat it is in.2. It does not have a return type. If it has a return type, then it is a method (even though it is legal, it's not ideal to have name a method the same name as the class).3. It can use any access modifier (this includes private).4. The default constructor does not take arguments.5. The first statement in a constructor has to have a super() type or this() type. If this is not written, by default, it's super(). It's illegal to have it in any other line other than the first line.6. Constructors can only access static variables.7. Only constructors have access to another constructor.Remember that interfaces do not have a constructor.


yes,because in constructor overloading constructor have same and different parameter list. In method overloading method have same name and different parameter list.


The first thing to note about constructor overloading is that Java creates a no argument constructor for you if and only if you have not typed a constructor yourself. Every class has a constructor even abstract ones (default no argument constructor). Abstract constructors are always executed. To overload a constructor you can do the following: class Test { String name; Test(String n) { name = n; System.out.println("Constructing Test Object named: " + name); } } In the case above we are overloading the default no argument constructor with a constructor that takes a String parameter. You can write you own no argument constructor as follows: class Test { Test() { System.out.println("Constructing Test Object"); } } To override our own no argument constructor we do this: class Test { Test() { // our no argument constructor System.out.println("Constructing Test Object"); } String name; Test(String n) { // overloading our no argument constructor with this // constructor that take a String parameter name = n; System.out.println("Constructing Test Object named: " + name); } }


No args means no arguments. Just like any regular method, a constructor can have zero or more arguments.No args means no arguments. Just like any regular method, a constructor can have zero or more arguments.No args means no arguments. Just like any regular method, a constructor can have zero or more arguments.No args means no arguments. Just like any regular method, a constructor can have zero or more arguments.


Return a value in the constructor is senseless, because a constructor is used to initialize a object instance and not to perform a task or a operation. When we call a constructor we used a sentence like this: MyClass var = new MyClass(); Then when we execute the above line the constructor return ('create') a new object of the type 'MyClass'. If this call could return an other type, for example an Integer, the constructor is considered a normal method, and if there are not more constructors a empty default constructor for MyClass is defined by the java compiler. public class MyClass{ // The java compiler will insert a real constructor here public Integer MyClass(){ //This isn't a constructor, only a simple method return new Integer(1); } }


A constructor is just a special form of a method. You can overload constructors in the exact same way as you can overload any other method.


Both are functions, i.e., places where you can write code. A constructor is simply a special method that is invoked automatically when an object is created.


Yes, a constructor name should always be the same as the class name. You do not directly call the constructor when you instantiate an object, so how the machine knows which method call? Easy, our constructor is always a method with the same name as the class and with no return value.


A constructor is usually the first method that gets invoked when a class is instantiated. This method usually creates the class object and sets initial variable values in order for the class object to do its functions. A Constructor in java cannot have a return type. It always creates and returns an object of the class for which it is the constructor. You cannot return a value from a constructor explicitly and if you try to do that, the compiler will give an error. The system knows that the purpose of the constructor is to create an object of the class and it will do the same irrespective of whether you declare a return type or not.


really there is no difference between constructor overloading and metho overloading


A parametrised constructor is any constructor that accepts one or more arguments where the first argument has no default value. If all parameters have default values then the constructor is regarded as being a default constructor that is overloaded. The copy constructor is an example of a parametrised constructor. If you do not define your own, one is generated for you by the compiler, However, the compiler-generated copy constructor performs a member-wise copy. If your class contains member pointers to memory allocations that are owned by the class, this will result in two or more classes owning the same memory, which would prove disastrous when any one instance is destroyed (it will completely invalidate all other instances). Therefore you must provide your own copy constructor to ensure every instance of the class owns its own allocations, by deep copying the pointers (copying the memory being pointed at rather than just the pointers). Other than that, there is no requirement to provide any parametrised constructor. You only need to provide parametrised constructors when you want to provide an alternative method of construction. Note that if you declare any parametrised constructor, including a copy constructor, the compiler does not generate a default constructor for you. If you require one, then you must provide your own. The default constructor may be parametrised provided all parameters are assigned default values. As an example, consider the following simple class that has a default constructor (as well as a compiler-generated copy constructor): class simple { public: simple():m_data(0){} void setdata(const float data){m_data = data;} void setdata(const int data){m_data = ( float ) data;} private: float m_data; }; When we instantiate this class, the data member is initialised to 0. If we wish to change the data member, we must subsequently call one of the setdata() methods. However, it would be more efficient to set the data member when the class is instantiated. Therefore we should provide a parametrised default constructor: simple(float data=0):m_data(data){} We should also provide a parametrised constructor to cater for integers: simple(int data):m_data(( float ) data){} Now we no longer need to call setdata() to initialise the class as we can do it all via the constructors.


A constructor is a special method that has the same name as the class name, and it cannot be invoked or called like a method call, it must be invoked by the new operator. For example, new Object();


A constructor, in object oriented programming concept is a method which has the same name of the class where it is defined. It will be called when an object is created for that class. The job of the constructor is the initialization of the members of the class.


It is a method called when the runtime constructs an instance of a Java class. You can either create your own constructor (or constructors, if you want to allow for parameterized construction) or, if you don't need any customized construction, you can use the default no-argument constructor which is inserted automatically thanks to the implicit extension of the Object-class.


Constructor will be automatically invoked when an object is created whereas method has to be called explicitly. Constructor needs to have the same name as that of the class whereas functions need not be the same. * There is no return type given in a constructor signature (header). The value is this object itself so there is no need to indicate a return value. * There is no return statement in the body of the constructor. * The first line of a constructor must either be a call on another constructor in the same class (using this), or a call on the superclass constructor (using super). If the first line is neither of these, the compiler automatically inserts a call to the parameterless super class constructor.



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