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Answered 2010-12-18 22:14:48

The US Supreme Court is the final arbiter of the Constitution, so its role in judicial review is that of making the ultimate decision about what is, and is not, constitutional.

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Federal Courts have used judicial review to invalidate hundreds of laws that it found to conflict with the Constitution.


In England and Wales, the Administrative Court (part of the High Court) has the power of judicial review, but only when requested. New law is not subject to a system of judicial review. In Scotland, the power of judicial review is held by the Court of Session, which fulfils a similar role to that detailed above.


He appoints judges to the supreme court as well as other federal courts, and can issue pardons and reprieves.


It is not necessary for the judicial courts to be men. Women play an active role in every judicial system in the Western World. There is no reason to keep them from participating in any judicial system.It is not necessary for the judicial courts to be men. Women play an active role in every judicial system in the Western World. There is no reason to keep them from participating in any judicial system.It is not necessary for the judicial courts to be men. Women play an active role in every judicial system in the Western World. There is no reason to keep them from participating in any judicial system.It is not necessary for the judicial courts to be men. Women play an active role in every judicial system in the Western World. There is no reason to keep them from participating in any judicial system.


No. The Constitution doesn't explicitly give any branch of government the right of judicial review; it is an implied power of the Judicial branch by virtue of their role in the United States' government. Judicial review is the primary check the Supreme Court has on the power Congress; if Congress also had the right of judicial review, the the two powers would cancel each other out. For more information, see Related Questions, below.


it is the supreme courts role is to interpret the constitution


The power of judicial review. Marbury v. Madison in 1803 established the tradition of the Supreme Court's role in "interpreting" whether or not a law passed by Congress is Constitutional or unconstitutional.


Although the power of judicial review isn't formally stated in the Constitution, the authority is implied in Article III, and in general by virtue of the Supreme Court's role as head of the Judicial branch of government. Judicial review was adopted from the English practice of common law, and was generally accepted as a function of the courts for hundreds of years.Marbury v. Madison, 5 US 137 (1803) is considered the first case to fully explicate the right of judicial review in the United States. That power has been recognized (to varying degrees) by all three branches of the US government for more than 200 years.For more information, see Related Questions, below.


appeals courts review decisions of trial courts for errors of law.


They allow parties to contest the ruling of lower courts. -Apex


None. Judicial Review is an implied power not explicitly stated in the US Constitution, but derived from the Supreme Court's role as head of the Judicial branch of government and the final arbiter of the constitutional interpretation.Marbury v. Madison, (1803) is often cited as the first instance of judicial review, but it is actually only the first time the Court declared an act of Congress unconstitutional and clearly explicated the doctrine of judicial review.For more information, see Related Questions, below.


the judicial branches role is to check other branches and listening to appeals from lower courts.


No role. There are 3 branches of government. The Execuitive, the legislative, and the judicial branche. The Judicial branch of government handles the courts,


The primary role of the US Supreme Court is interpreting the Constitution. The Supreme Court of the United States has the ultimate responsibility for settling disputes and interpreting the meaning of laws. It also determines what national policy will be when it applies law to specific disputes. The Supreme Court, the only court created by the Constitution, has the final say on all legal matters that come to it. It is the highest court in our system and there is no appeal from its decisions unless future courts reverse past court decisions. It is the only court that has the final say on Judicial Review -- that is, the constitutionality of a law or action relevant to a case under its review. It has original jurisdiction over cases involving two or more states, and appellate jurisdiction over cases from lower federal courts and the highest state courts (if the state case addresses a preserved federal question).


AnswerIn the U.S. Supreme Court, the power of judicial review gives the court the ability to at least pronounce that a law passed by the legislature does not comply with the Constitution. First begun with Marbury v. Madison, (1803) the Supreme Court can invalidate a legislative action purely based on the Court's opinion of what the Constitution requires.Judicial review expanded the power of the Supreme Court because it gave them the power to declare laws passed by Congress (or in the case of a State Supreme Court, laws passed by a state legislature) to be unconstitutional - that's a huge power to have.While the framers clearly intended the Supreme Court to have the power to declare laws passed by the states to be unconstitutional, they never said anything about federal judicial review - the debate concerning that has been going on for quite some time). That said, Marshall was able to pull off an incredible victory from what appeared to be certain defeat. This was largely due the Chief Justice's brillant interpretation of the Constitution, and the role of the courts.For more information, see Related Questions, below.


The term "judicial review" refers to the practice of evaluating laws and policies relevant to a case before the court to determine whether they're in compliance with the US Constitution.Historically, the Supreme Court's role rested in formally securing the right of judicial review for the Judicial Branch, which was accomplished in Chief Justice John Marshall's opinion for Marbury v. Madison, (1803).Marshall's idea wasn't new; judicial review is a longstanding practice arising from English common law and had already been adopted by the US courts. In his opinion for Marbury, Marshall described a fairly recent incident involving a 1796 Act of Congress concerning military pensions that a federal Circuit Court had declared unconstitutional. Congress accepted the decision without argument, and made the required changes to the legislation.The Supreme Court had also used judicial review in earlier cases, such as Hylton v. Ware, (1796), when the Ellsworth Court evaluated the constitutionality of a federal treaty and upheld its provisions against the state. Most people overlook this case because the federal law was deemed constitutional and didn't result in a conflict between different branches of government.Today, the Supreme Court is established as the final authority on interpreting laws and assessing their constitutionality.


In the United States, the power of "Judicial Review" by the judicial branch (Supreme Court) of the Federal government may be used to override any acts passed by the legislative (Congress) and executive (Presidential) branches of the Federal government. A person who believes in a strong judicial branch of government would be referred to as a "Judicial Activist". Refer to the Google Book link, below, for further information.


The primary role of the US Supreme Court is interpreting the Constitution.The Supreme Court of the United States has the ultimate responsibility for settling disputes and interpreting the meaning of laws. It also determines what national policy will be when it applies law to specific disputes.The Supreme Court, the only court created by the Constitution, has the final say on all legal matters that come to it. It is the highest court in our system and there is no appeal from its decisions unless future courts reverse past court decisions.It is the only court that has the final say on Judicial Review -- that is, the constitutionality of a law or action relevant to a case under its review.It has original jurisdiction over cases involving two or more states, and appellate jurisdiction over cases from lower federal courts and the highest state courts (if the state case addresses a preserved federal question).SummaryThe main functions of the Supreme Court are to:Settle disputes between states.Hear appeals from state and federal courts.Determine the constitutionality of federal laws.


The president of the U.S. has the power to appoint Supreme Court justices


A.taxing the statesB.overturning the Treaty of ParisC.establishing the role of the Supreme Court in judicial reviewD.writing the supremacy clause


The officials of the judicial branch of government are the nine justices of the Supreme Court. Federal judges also play an important role in the judicial branch.


The Constitution is the set of guiding principles or laws all Supreme Court decisions must adhere to. It is also the document the Court applies when exercising judicial review of state or federal laws relevant to cases before the Court.



they have original jurisdiction over most federal cases


It was the first time the Court struck down an act of Congress (Judiciary Act, 1789), thus establishing the doctrine of judicial review and the power of the Court to be chief interpreter of the Constitution. Many historians believe the "Founding Fathers" had intended for the federal courts to have the power of judicial review. But even after the Marbury decision, many who supported the theory of "states' rights" continued to argue that the states rightly had that power according to their interpretation of the Constitution. It took a Civil War to uphold once and for all time, the supremacy of the Federal government including its power of judicial review.



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