Units of Measure
Space Travel and Exploration
The Moon

What is the map of the stars as seen from the moon?

789

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2011-10-23 22:42:20
2011-10-23 22:42:20

There's only one difference between the sky seen from the Earth and the sky seen from the moon.

The sky seen from the Earth has a moon in it, and the sky seen from the moon has an Earth in it.

Other than that, exactly the same objects in the same patterns are seen from both places.

001
๐ŸŽƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Related Questions


They can be seen. The stars are not visible in picture taken from the moon because the exposure on the camera is set too low.


Unlike the Earth, the Moon has no atmosphere to obscure the view of the stars.


Seen from the moon, the sun, earth, and stars all hang in a black sky.


The brighter the Moon (closer to full) the fewer stars that can be seen due to the Moon 'blinding' observers.


They are too dim to be seen because of all the light the moon reflects.


The moon is incredibly small as compared to any stars that can be seen in the sky, although because the moon is so close to Earth, it looks large.


you planning on goin to the moon? or bein a scientist? ask a pro.


its only the stars that are close to the moon that are usually not seen because of the suns light reflects on the moon but the out of that light you should be able to see.


The sky seen on the moon is always black during the day and during the night (with stars) because the moon does not have an atmosphere in which the sun can scatter light.


When there is no moon the sky is darker. Stars can be seen more easily. If there were no Moon at all, we would get much smaller tides.


Moon, planets, stars, now and then a comet.


The sky is too brightly lit for stars to be seen. At pre-dawn, stars and the moon may just be visible. As the sun rises and the sky brightens, stars and the moon fades away.


Using a star map could potentially be useful as we used the stars to navigate in the times before advanced technology. Since the distance between the Earth and the moon is tiny compared to the distance between stars the constellations you see from the moon are exactly the same ones you see from Earth.


Yes. Ever seen the Sun, the Moon, or the stars?


A star map shows the position of the stars as seen from the Earth, so making it useless when viewed from space.


From the moon the constellations would not be very different as seen from Earth, so a star atlas used on Earth would be ok to use on the moon.


Whether during the day or the night, stars are still there in the sky. It is that in daylight, it is impossible to see the stars and the moon due to the glare from the sky. Only during the darkness of night does stars and the moon becomes visible to the human eyes.


Smoke. Fog. A shadow. The sun, moon and stars. A rainbow.


Stars in the sky appear at night time. If it is cloudy outside, stars will not be able to be seen by the naked eye. The moon also appears at night time.


No. Stars twinkle on Earth because the light beams have to enter the atmosphere, altering the brightness of the star by the second. Since the moon really doesn't have a atmosphere, stars seen from there wouldn't twinkle.


For the "faked photo" in the Forgery Training, click anywhere on the Moon. The flaw is that stars could never be seen through the unlit part of the Moon.


gay . But seriously: No hole seen, you can't see stars through the unlit part of the Moon.


Stars are normally seen at night. However, our Sun is also a star and it is seen during the day. So stars can be seen at anytime.


The shadow of the earth passing over the face of the moon, also when the moon is in total eclipse you can see the stars more clearly.


Black, as there is no appreciable atmosphere to scatter the light. In this blackness the stars, earth and sun can be seen.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.