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2009-10-28 02:58:55
2009-10-28 02:58:55

The name of planet X is Nibiru

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Planet X is just the temporary name used for a planet that hasn't been named yet. For example, Pluto was called Planet X before it got its official name. There isn't currently any unnamed planet being called Planet X.


Planet x is the name used to name undiscovered planets that might exist. The belief that an actual "Planet X" is out there and on a collision course with Earth is a different story.


Yes. Planet X is the one we haven't discovered yet. Since we haven't actually discovered it, we know nothing about it. Once Planet X is actually discovered, it will be given a real name, freeing up "Planet X" for the _next_ undiscovered planet. Planet X is also the name of the planet used in many old-time "space opera" science fiction movies.


No. Planet X is just a name for a planet that is not yet proven to exist. Before Pluto was discovered, back when it was just a theory, it was called Planet X. So there is no Planet X that will hit us in the future


"Planet X" is the temporary name given to a planet that lacks a designation. Pluto was, at one point, known as Planet X. Some members of the cults that have formed around the Nibiru Cataclysm Theory believe, in ignorance, that 'Planet X' is NASA's secret name for Nibiru, a mythical, large, planet-like object that is predicted (by Nancy Lieder) to collide with Earth.


No. "Planet X" is a temporary, basically meaningless, designation for a planet, given until the planet can be assigned a proper name. It does not refer to any specific planet. For a while, Pluto was referred to as 'Planet X.' However, the title may be given to any type of planet.


A planet after the dwarf planet Pluto It Is A Name For A Unnamed And Unconfirmed Planet See related question for Nibiru


Yes and no. "Planet X" is a designation given temporarily to any new planet with no name. It does not refer to a specific planet, and once a planet is given a name, 'Planet X' is discarded as a title. Several planets, including Pluto, have been referred to as "Planet X."Supporters of the Nibiru Cataclysm Theory sometimes claim that "Planet X" is NASA's method of keeping "Nibiru," a mythical, large planet-like object, secret, as part of a cover up. There is no scientific foundation for this "theory."



planet x is real you just have to believe and planet x does not have a x on it.dumb


No one did. It doesn't exist. Planet X means a planet without a name. And if nibiru or planet X was going to hit us it would take up 75% of the night sky and we would have been able to see it since 2003


Percival Lowell hypothesized that an undiscovered planet caused discrepancies in the orbits of Uranus and Neptune. He called it "Planet X" and the name has stuck. When Pluto was first discovered it was thought to be Planet X, but further examination showed that it could not be the cause of the orbital discrepancies (which were later shown to never have existed in the first place; the apparent problems were caused by some inaccurate observations). The reasoning for the name "Planet X" is that X is traditionally used for an unknown quantity. Lowell certainly didn't believe that, when found, it would turn out to have a gigantic X on it.


That is unknown. "Planet X" is the name given to a hypothetical planet beyond Neptune (or beyond Pluto, when it was still considered a planet). No planet is known to exist in our Solar System beyond planet Neptune, but one might still be found.


Planet X does not exist - it was a hypothetical planet.


"Planet X" is a temporary title given to a newly discovered planet with no official designation. The title is dispensed with once a planet is given a permanent designation. There is no specific planet called "Planet X." Several planets, including Pluto, have been called this before being named. Believers of the Nibiru Cataclysm Theory sometimes claim that "Planet X" is the name that NASA has given "Nibiru," a mythical planet-like object, as part of a cover up. As 'Planet X' might be any planet, it might be any size.


Planet X is an informal name for the planet Pluto [See related question] however in later years it has come to be named as the hypothetical and 2012 disaster planet called Niburu [See related link].


That's a rather difficult question; "Planet X" is a temporary title that may refer to any planet that may or may not exist, or does not have a permanent designation. Therefore, as "Planet X" may be any newly found planet that has yet to be confirmed, it may have nearly anything on it. For a while, Pluto was referred to as "Planet X," but was then verified and given a permanent name.Believers of the Nibiru Cataclysm Theory sometimes claim that "Planet X" is the name NASA has given to "Nibiru," a mythical planet-like object, as part of a conspiracy/cover up. There is no scientific foundation for this "theory."


Planet x is the name used to name undiscovered planets that might exist. The belief that an actual "Planet X" is out there and on a collision course with Earth is a different story. If you ask these people they'll tell you it's really, really, close and we're all in deep, deep...


Planet X is not a planet because it is not real, it's made up.


No. Planet X was a provisional name for a planet believed to exist beyond the orbit of Neptune based on a slight anomaly in its orbit. It was later realized that the anomaly was due to a miscalculation of the mass of Uranus.


Not really. Planet X was a provisional name used to refer to a possible but unnamed planet beyond the planets known at the time. Pluto once held this title. No object currently holds it.


Planet x is the planet behind Pluto which is commonly reffered to as Selena but is not yet a planet(or clarified planet).


Planet X was a hypothetical planet which was searched for after the discovery of planet Neptune. `Planet-X` does not exist.


No, planet x is not real.


There is no "Planet X". See links.



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