Word and Phrase Origins

What is the origin of the phrase 'Who'd have thunk it'?

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2009-10-30 22:21:21
2009-10-30 22:21:21

In the early days of radio and TV, Edgar Bergen (yes, Candace's dad) had a ventriloquist act which featured a dummy named Mortimer Snerd. Mortimer was pretty dumb, and most of the time when something was explained to him, he'd shake his head and say "Who'd have thunk it?"

You might also be familiar with another of Mortimer's inventions - the word "DUH!"

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