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What is the value of a 1971 half dollar?

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2010-09-30 19:03:36
2010-09-30 19:03:36

August 9, 2009

The 1971 Kennedy Half Dollar was Produced at 2 US mints: Philadelphia which is shown as 1971-P in this list and Denver which is shown as 1971-D in this list. To determine which coin you have it will be necessary to locate the mint mark. This mark consists of a small letter which will be found on the obverse [heads] side of the coin just above the date at the base of the neck. A letter "P" is for Philadelphia and a letter "D" is for Denver. These coins can still be found in circulation so they have a circulated value of fifty cents.The uncirculated values for these coins are shown in the following list:

Uncirculated Grades..........1971-P............1971-D

MS60..................................$6.....................$6

MS63..................................$10....................$8

MS64..................................$15....................$12

MS65..................................$35....................$17

MS66..................................$325..................$45

MS67..................................$2,000...............$125

More:This coin was actually minted at 3 different mints: Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco. Circulated coins are worth $0.50 but uncirculated coins are worth mentioning. These are the values according to USA Coin Book as of 09/2010:

Philadelphia: An MS65 Brilliant uncirculated coin is worth about $1.42

Denver: An MS65 Brilliant uncirculated coin is worth about $1.18

San Francisco: Proof coins were minted here and they are worth $5.53 in PR65 condition.

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All circulation half-dollar dated 1971 and later were struck in copper-nickel. Please see the Related Question for more.

All circulation half-dollar dated 1971 and later were struck in copper-nickel. Please see the Related Question for more.


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