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What legal action can the landlord take if you left the apartment four months prior to the lease expiration even though you gave them a thirty-day notice?

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2005-09-16 21:00:55
2005-09-16 21:00:55

The Landlord has a duty to mitigate damages (in other words, to attempt to find a replacement tenant). However, if the Landlord is unable to find a replacement, the Landlord can bring a cause of action for breach of contract and is entitled to a full judgment of the remainder of the contract unless the vacated tenant can show frustration of purpose or some other appropriate remedy. The 30-day notice is irrelevant as to this scenario.

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