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What symbiotic relationship is the nile crocodile and Egyptian plover?

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2011-08-30 17:51:02
2011-08-30 17:51:02

A mutualistic relationship, that is, both species benefit. The bird gets food, and the crocodile gets its teeth cleaned.

The Egyptian plover hops right into the open mouth of the Nile crocodile to remove parasites. After the job is done, whether the crocodile is hungry or not the bird always leaves unharmed.

This symbiotic relationship is actually not proven to be factual at all.

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The Egyptian plover and the crocodile have a symbiotic relationship.

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it enters to remove parasites from the mouth of crocodile.

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to clean meat out of crocodiles teeth

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be couse of symbiosis relationship

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The address of the Plover Public Library is: 301 Main St, Plover, 50573 0112


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