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What two factors cause epidermal cells to die?

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2014-08-22 15:42:34
2014-08-22 15:42:34

Low blood supply and low keratin cause epidermal cells to die. Epidermal cells make up the epidermis, the outer layer of the skin covering the exterior body surface of vertebrates.

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protects skinThe function of the cells in the epidermis is to die and form a protective layer around the body.


We skin cells are made, they are made in the deep layers of the skin, the dermal layer. This layer of the skin has blood supply, and cells that are in the dermal layer stay alive just fine. However, as cells in the upper layer, the epidermis, die; the skin cells in the dermal layer gets, pushed up into the epidermal layer. In this layer of the skin, there is no blood supply. However, nutrients are still passed from the blood rich dermal cells to the epidermal cells. The problem occurs when the epidermal cell is pushed right to the top of the epidermal layer, where there is no blood supply and it is too far away from the dermal layer to get nutrients vie osmosis. The cells in the upper epidermis get no nutrients and therefore die. Epidermal cells also die, ironically, because of the substances that they produce, keratin. Keratin is secreted by all skin cells to make the skin tough, durable and waterproof. However the build up of this keratin in the cell, leaks out in the extracellular space (the area outside the cell) and starts to breakdown the membranes of the cells around them and the cells essentially end up killing each other.Epidermal cells die because of the loss of nutrient supply as they get closer and closer to the surface of the skin, and the buildup of keratin inside them that leaks out into the area outside the cells.Read more: Why_do_epidermal_cells_die


We skin cells are made, they are made in the deep layers of the skin, the dermal layer. This layer of the skin has blood supply, and cells that are in the dermal layer stay alive just fine. However, as cells in the upper layer, the epidermis, die; the skin cells in the dermal layer gets, pushed up into the epidermal layer. In this layer of the skin, there is no blood supply. However, nutrients are still passed from the blood rich dermal cells to the epidermal cells. The problem occurs when the epidermal cell is pushed right to the top of the epidermal layer, where there is no blood supply and it is too far away from the dermal layer to get nutrients vie osmosis. The cells in the upper epidermis get no nutrients and therefore die. Epidermal cells also die, ironically, because of the substances that they produce, keratin. Keratin is secreted by all skin cells to make the skin tough, durable and waterproof. However the build up of this keratin in the cell, leaks out in the extracellular space (the area outside the cell) and starts to breakdown the membranes of the cells around them and the cells essentially end up killing each other. Epidermal cells die because of the loss of nutrient supply as they get closer and closer to the surface of the skin, and the buildup of keratin inside them that leaks out into the area outside the cells.


The cells on the epidermis have definite life cycle. Each epidermal cell begins life deep in the epidermis, where cells divide to form new cells. The new cells gradually mature and move upwards in the epidermis as new cells form beneath them. After about two weeks, the cells die and become part of the surface layer of the epidermis. Hope this helps!!


Each hair develops from a group of epidermal cells at the base of a tubelike depression called a hair follicle, which extends from the surface into the dermis and contains the hair root. The epidermal cells at the base are nourished from dermal blood vesssels in a projection of connective tissue at the deep end of the follicle. As these epidermal cells divide and grow, older cells are pushed toward the surface. The cells that move upward and away from the utrient supply become keratinized and die. Their remains constitute the structure of a developing hair shaft that extends away from the skin.


what cause blood cells to die off


The outer layer of the epidermis is full of scale like that frequently flake off. These cells are pushed to the surface as they begin to die.


1. Keratinocytes synthesize and accumulate the protein keratin, which disrupts the Internal organization of the cell, and the cells die. These dry, scale like keratinized cells on the surface of the epidermis are resistant to the dehydration and friction


you would die cause of no oxygen


Well, environmental factors like climate change can cause a species to die out because they were not able to adapt to their environment.


Sometimes they do and people can die from it.


Because the cause the cells in the fruit to decay and die


cancer cell are cells that have a problem in their DNA which can lead to out of control division and old cells have no problems with their DNA they just die and cause no damage


Previous Answer: cells that are located on your wrist. The wrist cell is a prokaryote because it does not contain a nucleiImproved Answer: WOW! Whoever wrote that last question has no idea what they were talking about! Wrist skin cells are epidermal cells. Assuming you've rubbed the dead cells off before looking at them in a microscope, you WILL see a nucleus. All human cells are EUKARYOTIC. Our cells have a nucleus, mitochondria, and other membrane-bound organelles (the very definition of a eukaryote).As epidermal cells rise to the surface from the dermis, they dry out, die and shrivel up. This creates a semi-waterproof layer of keratin at the surface. THAT layer doesn't cells with nuclei, but then again, the cells are dead anyway! To be precise, skin cells are part of a tissue known as stratified squamous keratinizing epithelium.*Source: A Bachelor's degree in Biology and 5+ years of teaching Biology


Certain drugs may cause brain cells to die. However, the main cause of brain cells dying is aging. This may happen quicker and earlier in some people who have a history of Alzheimer's Disease or Multiple Sclerosis.


This depends on the context of the question. Our cells do die, and we do die, but the two are not necessarily connected. Many of our cells are still alive after we die, and die after we die. If all of your cells die, then you cannot be alive. If all of your cells died at once, then you would die at that instant.



When red blood cells die, the heme in their hemoglobin is converted to bilirubin in the spleen. The bilirubin is processed by the liver, enters bile and is eventually excreted through feces. Once hemoglobin is in the red cells of the blood, it circulates for the life span of those cells. The hemoglobin that is released when the cells die is turned into bilirubin. If for any reason , the red blood cells die at a faster rate than usual , bilirubin can get backed up in the blood and cause the disease. For full details check out the site http://www.jaundicesymptoms.net/


the answer is yes. this is because the decreasing temperature would cause most of the bacteria cells to die and eventually the bacteria would die.



A very high fever can cause brain cells to begin to die off.


all cells die. when human skin cells die, for example, they are shed and we call it dust.


When the receptors of the plasma membrane in a cell are damaged the cell with typically die. In humans this is no cause for alarm as new cells are created daily while old cells die off.


You can die from any kind of cancer, I think. If cancer cells are malignant they can spread to other parts of the body and cause tumours elsewhere.



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