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Swine Flu (H1N1/09)

What type of virus is the H1N1 classified as?

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Answered 2009-12-09 08:23:46

It is a Type A Influenza virus with RNA genome.


Also called Swine Flu, the 2009 Pandemic Flu, 2009 Swine Flu, and A-H1N1/09.

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Related Questions


"H1N1" is the name of a specific subtype of influenza Type A virus. Many different flu infections have been caused by the H1N1 subtype of influenza viruses, including the recent pandemic swine flu which is the Influenza Type A H1N1/09 virus.


The H1N1 Swine influenza is a virus.


eight genes are present in h1n1 virus


Yes, it is the Influenza caused by the Type A H1N1/09 virus.


H1N1 is a flu virus, not a bacterium.


Swine flu is caused by a virus, not bacteria. It is the Influenza Type A H1N1/09 virus that causes this type of flu.


H1N1 is a grouping of viruses that are subtypes of the Type A Influenza viruses. There are three types of influenza viruses that people get: Type A, Type B, and Type C. The type A H1N1 subtype of viruses are the most common cause of flu in humans (around half of all flu cases in 2006, for example). Some strains of H1N1 are also found to cause disease in other animals such as birds and pigs. The H1N1 subtype has been responsible for some major flu pandemics in recent history, for example, the post-World War 1 Spanish flu in 1918 and the 2009 swine flu pandemic (A-H1N1/09) were both due to Type A H1N1 virus subtypes.See related question below for more information about the virus that caused the 2009 Pandemic: Novel H1N1 Swine Flu also known as A-H1N1/09 virus.


Swine Flu (and other H1N1 flu viruses) is a Type A influenza, but all Type A influenza viruses are not swine flu, or other H1N1 viruses. Swine flu is just one of many subtypes of Type A influenza. Swine Flu is caused by the Type A H1N1/09 Virus.


H1N1 is the general name of several influenza viruses, of which H1N1/09, the pandemic swine flu, is one. It is a Type A influenza virus and the H and N stand for the two proteins on the outer surface of the virus. See the related question below with more information about the make up of H1N1.


It is a strain of virus. It is commonly called the Swine Flu virus and has been around for many decades. The pandemic A-H1N1/09 flu virus is brand new and different than the other H1N1 viruses. See more in related questions. Swine flu is a respiratory disease caused by type A influenza virus that regularly causes outbreaks of influenza in pigs. The "classical" swine flu virus (an influenza type A H1N1 virus) was first isolated from a pig in 1930. Swine flu viruses cause illness in pigs, but the death rates are low. This new virus, although it is being called "swine flu," is not the same virus.


How many people in the Philippines are affected by a influenza a(h1n1) virus?


Swine Flu A-H1N1/09 is caused by a virus, not by a fungus. The virus is a Type A Influenza strain named A-H1N1/09 or also called the Pandemic Swine Flu virus among other names around the world.


Swine flu is a respiratory disease caused by type A influenza virus that regularly causes outbreaks of influenza in pigs. The "classical" swine flu virus (an influenza type A H1N1 virus) was first isolated from a pig in 1930. Swine flu viruses cause illness in pigs, but the death rates are low. This new virus, although it is being called "swine flu," is not the same virus.


No, the H1N1 vaccine won't make you sicker or healthier if you already have H1N1.



It is a flu (influenza) virus. All flus are caused by viruses. A virus is categorized by type such as Influenza Virus Type A, Type B or Type C. Viruses are always changing and mutating, and flu viruses are especially quick in their ability to mutate. When a mutation occurs, they are categorized further as subtypes and then to a finder degree as strains. H1N1 is a subtype of Influenzavirus A. The pandemic swine flu is further identified as A-H1N1/09 indicating the specific mutation of A-H1N1 into the type that caused the pandemic of 2009. Beyond that, the individual strains are broken down and named usually according to the year they were isolated and the location where they were first found. See the related question below for more information on how viruses are named.


It is referring to the type of the influenza virus. Type A influenza causes flu in birds and some mammals. The main variants of the Type A Influenza Virus include: Bird Flu (H5N1), Human Flu (H3N2, H1N1, H1N2), Swine Flu (H1N1), Novel Swine Flu (H1N1/09) Horse Flu (H7N7, H3N8), Dog Flu (H3N8), and Cat Avian Flu (H5N1 Felidae). There are also Type B and Type C Influenza viruses that infect humans and some other animals.


The H1N1 virus does not choose between people according to their ethnicity or nationality. We all are equally at risk.


My son was just diagnosed with H1 (not H1N1). His doctor said that the H1 virus has similar characteristics to H1N1 but it is an unidentified strain of the flu.


The CDC-approved trivalent vaccines for the 2011-2012 flu season contain and will protect against the following three flu virus strains: 1. Type A Influenza/California/7/09 (H1N1)-like virus (Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus) 2. Type A Influenza/Perth/16/2009/ (H3N2)-like virus 3. Type B Influenza/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus


The H1N1 virus, otherwise known as "swine flu" originated from none other than swine.


The family practitioner doesnt actually identify the H1N1 virus. If a local test shows up as positive, they send those results to a more specialized hospital to determine if that result is of the flu or the H1N1 virus.


There are different kinds of H1N1 viruses, you can catch the exact same kind only once in your lifetime. The Type A, H1N1/09 influenza virus that caused the pandemic is different than other H1N1 viruses. So you could get infected by more than one type of H1N1 in your lifetime, but not the exact same Type A, H1N1/09. Usually your body recognizes a very similar type of flu as the same and can prepare defenses for it quickly because of the prior immune response to the other one, but if different enough you will have to start over with a new immune response that allows time for the virus to make you feel ill before you can begin to "kill" the new type. The answer is that you can catch the same one only once, but you can still catch all the other H1N1 viruses (one time each) after that.


The H5N1 virus or a variation of an Influenza type A virus causes avian flu. Most human flus are caused by types B and C. H1N1 or swine flu is also type A.


No, the H1N1 virus does not contain carcinogens.



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