What was the suffrage movement?

The Women's Suffrage movements of the 18th and 19th century sought to attaain the right to vote for women, who were historically denied the right. In the US, women briefly had voting rights in New Jersey prior to the Americal Revolution, because the right was initially based on owning property. Beginning in 1848, increased popular and legislative efforts led to the 19th Amendment, passed in 1919 and ratified in 1920.
In 1885 a enfranchisement of women was passed in the Parliament. This motion put the whole question of women's suffrage, their right to vote, on the political agenda. The calling for Women's Suffrage was moved in the House by Dr. Edward Stirling in 1886. It proposed to give the franchise to women over the age of 21 years who were either spinsters or widows and met a property qualification. Though the Bill was passed it did not receive the required majority.

On 13 July 1888 Mary Lee and her fellow workers from the Social Purity League, and others, met and initiated the South Australian Women's Suffrage League. In her speech to the inaugural public meeting held a week later, Mary Lee said the franchise "would assist them to re-dress women's wrongs - moral, social, industrial and educational."

-Charles
This was the movement to get the vote for women.
The words suffrage comes from Latin suffragium, meaning "vote", "political support", and the right to vote. In the U.S. women's suffrage movement addressed primarily the right to vote. However, the expression is also used for the economic and political reform movement aimed at extending these rights to

women and without any restrictions or qualifications such as property ownership, payment of tax, or marital status. The Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution provided that no state nor the federal government could deny a citizen the right to vote based on that citizen's sex.
The words suffrage comes from Latin suffragium, meaning "vote", "political support", and the right to vote. In the U.S. women's suffrage movement addressed primarily the right to vote. However, the expression is also used for the economic and political reform movement aimed at extending these rights to

women and without any restrictions or qualifications such as property ownership, payment of tax, or marital status. The Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution provided that no state nor the federal government could deny a citizen the right to vote based on that citizen's sex.