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Women's Suffrage

Women’s suffrage refers to the right of women to vote and/or to run for public office. In the 1800s, there were relatively few countries that gave women this right, but that changed in the 1900s.

3,209 Questions
Women's Suffrage

When did women first get the right to vote?

In the United States, women got the right to vote in 1920. The women's suffrage movement started in the 19th century, with the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments, which stated that all men and women were created equal, serving as a major step. An organized effort to secure women’s right to vote took hold over the second half of the 19th century, spanning organizations and generations of supporters. It was a tough fight, but on August 18, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women the right to vote in America.

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Law & Legal Issues
Politics and Government
Finland
Women's Suffrage

Which country was the first to give women the right to vote?

At a national level, Grant Duchy ofFinland(1883) was first to declare universal suffrage and allow anyone to participate in politic, women included, although it was a autonymous part of Russian Empire at that stage. The first independent country to give women the right to vote in national elections (not local or provincial) was New Zealand in 1893. Previous bills or amendments only narrowly failed in New Zealands parliament as early as 1878.

Places with similar status which granted women the vote include Wyoming Territory (1869). Other possible contenders for first "country" to grant female suffrage include the Corsican Republic(1769), the Isle of Man (1881), the Pitcairn Islands(1838), Franceville(1889), but some of these had brief existences as independent states and others were not clearly independent. Sweden was first one to allow women to participate in elections in 1718,but only to guild members and only on local elections.
Of currently existing independent countries, New Zealand was the first to give women the right to vote in 1893 when it was a self-governing British colony. Similarly, the colony of South Australia enacted legislation giving women the vote in 1894. Places with similar status which granted women the vote include Wyoming Territory (1869). Other possible contenders for first "country" to grant female suffrage include the Corsican Republic, the Isle of Man (1881), the Pitcairn Islands, and Franceville, but some of these had brief existences as independent states and others were not clearly independent.

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History of the United States
US Constitution
Women's Suffrage

What amendment gave women the right to vote and what year?

The Nineteenth Amendment (ratified August 18, 1920), says, "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."

This amendment granted women's suffrage, women's right to vote.

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Women in History
Women's Suffrage

Why did men exercise absolute tyranny over women?

You should try reading The Seneca Falls Declaration. It gives a really good portrayal of how men abused and subjugated women in the past (and sometimes the present as well for all you angry trollers).

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Politics and Government
Women's Suffrage

In what year did women get the right to vote?

It depends upon the country.

New Zealand women gained the right to vote first, in 1893.

In Australia, the colony of South Australia was where women were first granted the right to vote in 1894. Women obtained the right to vote and stand as candidates for both houses of federal Parliament on 16 June 1902. This applied to the federal election of 1903.

In Canada women won the right to vote in 1918.

The 19th US Constitutional Amendment, which gave women the right to vote in the US, was ratified on August 18, 1920, when the 36th state, Tennessee, voted to ratify the amendment. The ratification was certified on August 26, 1920.

In Britain it was in 1928.

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Lebanon
Women's Suffrage

How do Lebanese men treat women?

Like men from any other country.

Some good, some better, some not so good.

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Women in History
Women's Suffrage

Where did Emily davison live?

Emily Davison was born in London. She lived in a number of places, including Birmingham, Sussex and Berkshire. She had stays in prison in Manchester and London. She hid in the Parliament building overnight during the census of 1911 so she could claim to live there, and this was recorded on census documents. It is likely that the places listed here are just a representative few.

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Politics and Government
Women's Suffrage

When did women get the right to vote?

This depends on which country, and for what type of elections.

  • New Zealand: 1893. Women gained the right to vote in New Zealand, the first country to grant women's suffrage, before the federal elections of 1902. This started a campaign for women's suffrage around the world.
  • Australia: In 1894, women in South Australia were first granted the right to vote. It was another eighteen years before women were permitted to vote federally (that is, Australia-wide). Women obtained the right to vote and stand for election for both houses of Parliament on 16 June 1902.
  • Finland: Finland is considered to be the pioneer European country in allowing women to have unrestricted rights to both vote and to stand for Parliament. This was granted in 1906.
  • US: 18 August 1920: the 19th amendment giving women the right to vote was passed. On August 26, 1920, when the 19th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States was ratified. Women in general were allowed to vote in local elections from 1910.
  • UK: In 1928 the British Parliament gave women the same voting rights as men. Parliament had previously granted women voting rights with some limitations in 1918.
  • Italy: Italian women voted for the first time in 1946 June.
  • Mexico: Mexican women were granted the vote in 1953.
  • Tunisia: Women in voted in Tunisia in elections for the first time in 1957.
  • Bahrain: It was only in 2001 that Bahrain granted Bahranian women the right to vote.

    Few countries still do not allow women to vote.

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Women's Suffrage

What did the women's suffrage movement lead to?

The Women's Suffrage Movement caused women to have the right to vote for a President.
It led to womens sufferage - getting the "right to vote".

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World War 1
Women's Suffrage

How did ww1 affect the cause of women's suffrage?

it didn't cause suffering it gained them the right to vote becuase it showed they can work as hard as men

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US Constitution
Society and Civilization
New Delhi
Women's Suffrage
Pulleys

What were the effects on society after the 19th amendment was ratified?

Now, many women's rights movements were halted, causing much turmoil to die. Also, we had a larger amount and range of voters. This made it so that the whole country's voice was heard.

Well after the amendment was ratified women were allowed to vote. So men and women were allowed to do the same things and have equality. So women could now be president like men could. After it was approved some men didn't like it and wanted to have power so they protested against it. -Sigisig14

(improved answer)

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Women's Suffrage

What is the theme of The Yellow Wallpaper?

It suggests that all women are imprisoned by masculine authority, which imposes itself despite its adverse effects. (Note that the story was written in 1890 when women's suffrage was only just beginning to succeed.)

---- Women often take a passive role in both marriage and their own mental health care

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Politics and Government
Britain in WW2
Civil Rights Movement
Women's Suffrage

When did women gain the right to vote?

Women gained the right to vote around the 1920's, when many feminist activists stood up for women's rights.

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South Africa
South Africa History
Women's Suffrage

How did South African women get voting rights?

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WW2 Homefront
Women's Suffrage
Eleanor Roosevelt

How did the women help in weapon making?

== == Women were trained to do machine work, to help to produce everything from air craft parts, to radios to boots to tires to,,,,,,,,,,,,You get the picture. Depending on her abilities and how she was trained, may women became expert makers of complicated machined parts that went into weapons and vehicle engines. Aircraft engines require perfectly balanced parts and they have to be made to close tolerances, and with no defects. Most war material plants had a small number of older, experienced men who had to train the women, who were taking the places of the young men who had gone into active military service. Once a woman was good at her job, she trained other women to do it as well. If she got really good at her job she might be promoted to a lead hand so she was supervising a "work group" of 10 to 20 other women, and she had to keep the work going and maintain quality control on the product being made. She was also required to keep track of their scarp amounts and make sure they were NOT wasting materials or goofing off in the bathroom. Music and jokes went a long way towards making the time pass quickly, even at 4 am on the over night shift. Not all women were able to do factory work, so they might wind up learning how to drive a truck, or a train. Or become a nurse or a lab technician.

828384
African-American History
US Constitution
Women's Suffrage

When did African Americans get the right to vote?

African-American men received the right to vote in 1870, as a result of the 15th Amendment to the constitution. But women (both black and white) did not receive the right to vote until the 19th amendment was finally ratified in August 1920.

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History, Politics & Society
History of England
Women's Suffrage

What is a suffragette?

== == A "suffragette" is a woman seeking the right to vote. (suffrage) The term is associated with the Women's Suffragette Movement, which sought the right of "suffrage" (i.e. to right to vote) for women, which was finally guaranteed by the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution (1929)
The women who was protesting for the right to vote are known as 'suffragettes"

Suffragist are names for the men and suffragette is for women.

Hope my answer helped!
the suffragettes were women who campained for womens right to vote! they were a ladies group with a few supporting men and they believed that women were the same as men and had the right to vote. they tied themselves to railings spoke in political meetings and some took it to the highest extreme of killing themselves to show what they believed in!
Generic title for womens groups involved in the movement to grant women the right to vote in the united states of America

B/S they were from britain
A female who caused violence in order to get the vote. Incase you want to know a suffragist used peaaceful tactics and suffragette used violence to get the votee xxx

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New Zealand Politics and Society
New Zealand History
Women's Suffrage

When did New Zealand first allow women to vote?

1893 - New Zealand was the first sovereign state in the world to allow woman to vote.
New Zealand was the first country in the world to allow women the right to vote in 1893.
women were granted the right to vote in new zealand first in 1893 (previous attempts had been made but this was the first time that it was legally not blocked), though they couldn't run until 1919. It was one of the first 'western' (in culture) areas that granted women the right to vote.
New Zealand was the first country to give women voting rights; women gained the right to vote in 1893. Whereas Twenty States and one Territory of the USA were first in 1869 and Isle of Man were second in 1881.

New zealand was the first country to extend voting rights to all of its citizens as voting rights had already been extended to indigenous males when women gained the right to vote.

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History of the United States
US Constitution
Women's Suffrage

Which amendment gave women the right to vote?

21th Amendment
Assuming you're discussing the US, it was the 19th Amendment that granted Women's Suffrage.

Women's Voting Rights in the USThe Nineteenth Amendment (ratified August 18, 1920), which says, "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."
19th
23rd
Amendment 19 Ratified 8/18/1920

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.
The 19th amendment
That would be the 19th Amendment.

You can read about it and about the women's suffrage movement by checking out the link below.

http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/conlaw/nineteentham.htm

The Nineteenth Amendment to the US Constitution(ratified August 18, 1920), says, "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."

This amendment granted women's suffrage, women's right to vote.
The Nineteenth Amendment to the US Constitution(ratified August 18, 1920), says, "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."

This amendment granted women's suffrage, women's right to vote.
The nineteenth amendment.
19th
The Nineteenth Amendment, ratified August 18 1920.
The 14th Amendment
nineteenth amendment
Amendment XIX, ratified in 1920.
19
19th Amendment :)
The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution have women the right to vote. It was passed by Congress on June 4, 1919 and ratified on August 18, 1920.
19
The 19th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America was ratified on August 18, 1920.

This gave women who were citizens of the USA the right to vote in national elections.

Some states, such as Montana or Wyoming had women's suffrage before this time.

The full text of the Constitution and the amendments are here on the National Archives site.
The 19th amendment gave women the right to vote.
the 19th

  • the seventeenth amendment gave the woman the right to vote it helped the woman win there votes to the U.S constitution
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History of the United States
Politics and Government
History of Canada
Women's Suffrage

When did women get the right to vote in Canada?

Women in Canada obtained the right to vote in a sporadic fashion. Federal authorities granted them the franchise in 1918, more than two years after the women of Manitoba became the first to vote at the provincial level in 1916. Québec women were denied the provincial vote until 1940. Indigenous women were not enfranchised federally until 1960. Source: The Canadian Encyclopedia - womens-suffrage.

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Politics and Government
US Constitution
Women's Suffrage

What year did women get to vote?

In 1920 the 19th Amendment was passed allowing women to vote. Some states allowed women to vote before that, but in 1920 it became a right.

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African-American History
US Constitution
Women's Suffrage

Which amendment gave African-American men the right to vote?

== == The Fifteenth Amendment (Amendment XV) to the United States Constitution prohibits each government in the United States from denying a citizen the right to vote based on that citizen's "race, color or previous condition of servitude" (i.e., slavery). It was ratified on February 3, 1870. The Fifteenth Amendment is one of the Reconstruction Amendments. The Fifteenth Amendment is the third of the Reconstruction Amendments. This amendment prohibits the states and the federal government from using a citizen's race,[1] color or previous status as a slave as a voting qualification. Its basic purpose was to enfranchise former slaves. While some states had permitted the vote to former slaves even before the ratification of the Constitution, this right was rare, not always enforced and often under attack. The North Carolina Supreme Court upheld this right of free men of color to vote; in response, amendments to the North Carolina Constitution removed the right in 1835.[2] Granting free men of color the right of to vote could be seen as giving them the rights of citizens, an argument explicitly made by Justice Curtis's dissent in Dred Scott v. Sandford. From Wikipedia

== ==
the 15th admendment
The fifteenth
The fifteenth.
Fifteenth Amendment

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Women's Suffrage

What was the conflict between women's suffrage and African-American issues?

Obviously, this is not a simple question! You might want to look at the situation of ealry black femisnists like Sojourner Truth...

In 1851 Truth traveled to Ohio to attend a women's rights convention. When she approached the podium to speak, some people taunted her, but she proceeded anyway. She told her audience, "I could work as much and eat as much as a man … and bear the lash as well! And ain't I a woman? I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?" Truth's speech moved the crowd. At the time, neither free blacks nor American women could vote, and there were dual movements to abolish slavery and grant women suffrage. After slavery officially ended in 1865 with the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, the status of blacks remained in question. Some in the women's right movement hoped to push for both women's suffrage (right to vote) and full citizenship rights for blacks, too. More moderate voices on both sides kept the two issues separate, however. For a time, Truth worked with Susan B. Anthony(1820-1906) and Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), the most prominent leaders in the suffrage movement, but broke away from them when Stanton stated that she refused to support black suffrage unless women were guaranteed the right to vote first.

When former slave Sojourner Truth rose to speak to a crowd of women's rights supporters in Akron, Ohio, in 1851, many women in the audience voiced their concern. Some objected simply on racial grounds, believing that a black woman had no right to get up and speak to a room full of white women. (Although slavery had been abolished in the North, many northerners still held racist views at that time.) Others were concerned that Sojourner Truth's appearance at the meeting would make it look like the women's rights movement was connected to the abolition movement. They wished to avoid that association because slavery was such a controversial issue. Ignoring the audience reaction, Sojourner Truth spoke passionately of women's strength, common sense, and abilities. She dismissed the notion that women were too delicate and irrational to have the same rights as men. The women in the audience cheered. Although Sojourner Truth became a famous and beloved supporter of abolition and women's rights, most other African American suffragists were unable to rise to such heights. While some white suffragists welcomed all activists regardless of race, the suffrage movement overall did not accept black women. One of the earliest male supporters of women's suffrage was the former slave and widely respected abolitionist Frederick Douglass. The women's movement welcomed the support of this distinguished African American man but gave little voice to African American women. Historians know that numerous black women supported the women's suffrage movement, though they were allowed only minimal participation in suffrage organizations. In most cases, their names have not been recorded for history. Those who did achieve some level of prominence in the movement included Harriet Forten Purvis (1810-1875) and her sister Margaretta Forten (c. 1815-1875). These women were part of prominent African American families known for their work in the abolition and women's rights movements. Many black women's rights supporters formed their own associations. They did this either because they were forced out of white organizations or because they chose not to join a group that didn't want them. Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) founded the Colored Women's League in 1892. Her organization later merged with another to form the National Association of Colored Women (NACW), and Terrell was later elected president of that group. One of the best-known African American suffragists was Ida B. Wells-Barnett (1862-1931). As part owner of a black newspaper in Memphis, Tennessee, Wells-Barnett had gained a reputation as a determined, outspoken seeker of justice. At a time when white mobs in the South terrorized black citizens-sometimes resulting in brutal murders, or lynchings, of innocent blacks-Wells-Barnett risked her own safety by writing passionate editorials condemning lynchings. She spent many years of her life arguing for the passage of laws that would make lynching a federal crime. Wells-Barnett also devoted much of her life to the fight for women's suffrage, despite the fact that the mainstream white organizations denied her equal standing with white suffragists. At the start of a massive 1913 suffrage parade in Washington, D.C., the parade's organizers asked Wells-Barnett to march in a segregated section for African Americans rather than with the white suffragists from her state of Illinois. She refused, insisting that she march alongside the white women or not at all. From the sidelines, Wells-Barnett watched the parade begin, quietly joining the Illinois group as they passed by. At many times during the decades-long battle for women's right to vote, black suffragists were rejected from the major national women's groups because the leaders were concerned about offending southern white women. Many southerners, even those passionate about women's right to vote, felt strongly that black women should not be included in that right. African American suffragists, bearing the dual burden of being black and female in a nation that undervalued both groups, were left to fight their own battles.

from "The Women's Suffrage Movement." American Social Reform Movements Reference Library. Ed. Judy Galens. Vol. 2. Detroit: U*X*L, 2007.

Lesley Williams

Evanston Public library

http://www.epl.org/library/reference-help.html

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History, Politics & Society
Women's Suffrage

When did woman start to protest about not voting?

In the United States, as far back as President John Adams' wife Abigail, who asked her husband to "remember the ladies," there were individual women who wanted a say in the decisions that affected their life. In the early to mid 1800s, journalist Margaret Fuller (who died in 1850) and abolitionist and early feminist Lucy Stone became known for speaking on behalf of equal rights for women (Stone was the first woman to keep her name when she married).

But perhaps the first organized event was a women's rights convention that took place at Seneca Falls (New York) in 1848. Attended by the era's leading proponents of equality and voting rights for women, it marked the launch of an ongoing campaign to change public opinion and win the vote. It should be noted that while women did not gain suffrage (an old word that meant "permission") nationally till 1920, certain states began giving women voting rights before that-- among the first was Colorado, in 1893, and Montana was the first state to sent a woman to congress, Jeannette Rankin, in 1916.

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