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New Testament
Jesus Christ

What were the names of Jesus' 12 original Apostles?

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05/11/2015

Other answers from our community:

Simon (later renamed Peter), Andrew, James, his brother John, Philip, Thomas, Matthew (also known as Levi), James the son of Alpheus, Judas/Thaddeus/Lebbaeus, Simon, and Judas Iscariot. After Judas Iscariot committed suicide, Matthias was chosen to replace him.

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From Matthew 10: 1. Simon, who is called Peter, 2. Andrew (Simon Peter's brother), 3. James, 4. John (James' brother), 5. Philip, 6. Bartholomew, 7. Thomas, 8. Matthew, 9. James (the son of Alphaeus), 10. Lebbaeus, whose surname was Thaddaeus, 11. Simon the Cananite, 12. Judas Iscariot

From Mark 3: 1. Simon, whom Jesus called Peter, 2. James, 3. John (James' brother), 4. Andrew (not mentioned as Simon Peter's brother here), 5. Philip, 6. Bartholomew, 7. Matthew, 8. Thomas, 9. James (the son of Alphaeus), 10. Thaddaeus, 11. Simon the Cananite, 12. Judas Iscariot

From Luke 6: 1. Simon Peter, 2. Andrew (Simon Peter's brother), 3. James, 4. John, 5. Philip, 6. Bartholomew, 7. Matthew, 8. Thomas, 9. James (the son of Alphaeus)... 10. Simon called the Zealot, 11. Judas (the son of James), 12. Judas Iscariot

The book of John does not give a list of the 12 apostles.

There is one name that is not consistent in the four lists that are given by Matthew, Mark, Luke and in Acts, which is Lebbaeus/Thaddaeus/Judas (the son of James).

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From Mark's Gospel (3:16-19): Simon Peter, Andrew, James (son of Zebedee) and his brother John, Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, Matthew, James (son of Alphaeus), Lebbaeus (also known as Thaddaeus), Simon the Cananaean and Judas Iscariot.

Mark's Gospel also refers to Levi, son of Alphaeus, as a tax collector whom Jesus called to follow him. Levi is not in the final list of the twelve apostles, as shown above. Since disciples are not supposed to change their minds when called to follow Jesus, the author of Matthew's Gospel resolved this when copying from Mark, by omitting any reference to Levi and instead making Matthew the tax collector. Luke retains the original reference to Levi.

Mark's Gospel also refers to a disciple called Simon the Cananaean, which is ambiguous, possibly meaning Canaanite (preferred by the King James Bible), that he was from the village of Cana or that he was a former Zealot. Matthew's Gospel resolves this as 'Canaanite', while Luke's Gospel says 'Zealot'.