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Answered 2014-06-16 05:51:50

Short answer: The last year for copper cents in the U.S. was 1982, when the composition was changed from 95% copper/5% zinc to 97.5% zinc/2.5% copper.

If the question was about Canadian cents, those were 98% copper until 1996, before switching to zinc for three years, and changing again to steel in 2000.

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Due to the rising price of copper, pennies were worth more than face value.


Pennies were never PURE copper. Those made before 1982 were 95% copper with 5% zinc (or zinc with tin in older ones).


1997 was they year that they went to 98.4% zinc, 1858-1996 was 95%-98% copper.


1860 The last copper pennies were made in England, and the same year the first bronze pennies were made.


copper is too expensive and limited.


They stopped when they realized it cost more to make the penny then the penny was worth. Any one could just get pennies, melt them down, and sell them for more than the pennies were worth.


Solid copper pennies were last minted in 1857 and were much larger than today's penny. Pennies were made mostly of copper until mid-1982, when the composition was changed to 97.5% zinc with a plating of 2.5% copper. The only exception was in 1943 when wartime copper shortages forced the Mint to make pennies out of scrap steel. Bronze cents were resumed the next year, 1944.



Originally pennies were made of copper. They are now made mainly of zinc.


The price of the copper used to make a penny cost more than a penny.


This change happened in 1974. See the related question below for more information.


They stopped making copper pennies in 1982. There are some 1982 pennies that are 95% copper and some that are not. 1983 pennies that are 95% exist but are rare and are collectors items.While the above statement would seem to be correct, it is, however, not completely true. The U.S. has never stopped making copper pennies, or pennies with some copper content, except in 1943, when they were made of a low-grade carbon steel and coated with zinc (having a grey color); this change was due to the need for copper and brass during World War II. These 1943 wartime pennies are commonly referred to as "steel" pennies. They contain NO copper...More correctly, 1982 was the last mint year for 95% copper cents. Since mid-1982, the newest (current, as of 2012) composition for U.S. one-cent coins ("pennies") has an inner core alloy of 99.2% zinc with 0.8% copper, with the coin balance as an outer plating of pure copper, for a total coin composition of 97.5% zinc and 2.5% copper. These current pennies are commonly called "zinc pennies", due to their heavy-majority zinc content, even though they do still contain some copper. The composition of U.S. pennies from mid-1864 to mid-1982 was an alloy of 95% copper with either 5% tin-and-zinc ("bronze" pennies) or 5% zinc ("brass" pennies). Before that, the composition was an alloy of 88% copper with 12% nickel from mid-1857 to mid-1864 (the only time any U.S. pennies ever contained nickel), and, initially, from 1793 to mid-1857, the first U.S. pennies were made of pure (100%) copper.Since the first U.S. one-cent coins in 1793, U.S. pennies have always contained at least some copper, except, again, in the singular case of the year 1943, the so-called "steel" pennies.Therefore, the most correct answer to the question is either:(1) the U.S. has never stopped making copper pennies, except in 1943; or(2) 1943 is the only year the U.S. stopped making copper pennies, or any pennies with NO copper in them.Hope this helps!


US Pennies were made of 95% copper (with the exception of the 1943 steel cent) from 1864-1982. Midway through 1982, the cent switched to copper plated zinc. So any penny dated 1983-present is just copper plated zinc. However a coin dated 1982 could either be 95% copper or copper plated zinc. A copper coin should weigh about 3.11 grams while the zinc pennies are lighter at about 2.5 grams.


1857, unless you're referring to Lincoln pennies, which were only 95% copper until 1982 when they were changed to zinc.


All US pennies made before 1982 are copper, along with some made in 1982 that are copper, however, copper-coated zinc pennies were also used during that year making identification by weighing necessary.



If "they" in the question refers to the U.S., the U.S. government, or the U.S. Mint, then 1982 was the last mint year for 95% copper Lincoln cents. Since mid-1982, the newest (current, as of 2012) formulation or composition for U.S. one-cent coins ("pennies") has an inner core alloy of 99.2% zinc with 0.8% copper, with the coin balance as an outer plating of pure copper, for a total coin composition of 97.5% zinc and 2.5% copper. These current pennies are commonly called "zinc pennies". The composition of U.S. pennies from mid-1864 to mid-1982 was an alloy of 95% copper with either 5% tin-and-zinc ("bronze" pennies) or 5% zinc ("brass" pennies). Before that, the composition was an alloy of 88% copper with 12% nickel from mid-1857 to mid-1864 (the only time any pennies ever contained nickel), and, initially, from 1793 to mid-1857, the first U.S. pennies were made of pure copper.Since the first U.S. one-cent coins in 1793, U.S. pennies have always contained at least some copper, except for 1943, when they were made of a low-grade carbon steel and coated with zinc, having a grey color, due to the need for copper and brass during World War II.Therefore, the most correct answer to the question is either:(1) "they" (the U.S.) have never stopped making copper pennies, except in 1943; or(2) 1943 is the only year the U.S. stopped making copper pennies.Hope this helps!


1982. Since then pennies have been mostly zinc with just a little copper.As the immediate above statement includes the word copper as part of the answer, which part is, in fact, true, then 1982 is not the answer to the question after all...If the "the(y)" part of the question above refers to the U.S., the U.S. government, or the U.S. Mint, then 1982 was the last mint year for 95% copper cents. Since mid-1982, the newest (current, as of 2012) composition for U.S. one-cent coins ("pennies") has an inner core alloy of 99.2% zinc with 0.8% copper, with the coin balance as an outer plating of pure copper, for a total coin composition of 97.5% zinc and 2.5% copper. These current pennies are commonly called "zinc pennies". The composition of U.S. pennies from mid-1864 to mid-1982 was an alloy of 95% copper with either 5% tin-and-zinc ("bronze" pennies) or 5% zinc ("brass" pennies). Before that, the composition was an alloy of 88% copper with 12% nickel from mid-1857 to mid-1864 (the only time any pennies ever contained nickel), and, initially, from 1793 to mid-1857, the first U.S. pennies were made of pure (100%) copper.Since the first U.S. one-cent coins in 1793, U.S. pennies have always contained at least some copper, except for 1943, when they were made of a low-grade carbon steel and coated with zinc, having a grey color, due to the need for copper and brass during World War II. These are commonly referred to as "steel" pennies (they contain NO copper)...Therefore, the most correct answer to the question is either:(1) "they" (the U.S.) have never stopped making copper pennies, except in 1943; or(2) 1943 is the only year the U.S. stopped making copper pennies, or made pennies with NO copper in them.Hope this helps!


Actually, they already have. The last Canadian pennies were minted in May 2012.


mostly made out of copper


copper is important because it makes pennies and pennies are good


Not really, as there are billions of them already in circulation.


they werent silver. they are refered to as steel pennies, and they were issued for several years during the war because the government need the copper for ammunition and other war related things, so they quit making pennies from copper


Well depending if your talking about all the different country's pennies, then Im not sure. But I do know that the pennies made in Canada and the states are. The main metal in these pennies are copper, and copper is worth more then what the penny is worth, so sometime in the near future they will atop making pennies.


Pennies were made out of pure copper from 1793-1857. Today, pennies are mostly made of zinc but coated with copper.



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