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Answered 2011-03-08 00:09:16

In general, parental rights are terminated either preparatory to an adoption, or after a trial in which it is determined that the parent is unfit. In any case, termination of parental rights does not, in itself, terminate child support.

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department of children and family services took my children in 1997 . How do I find out if I have any parental rights.


In most jurisdictions the court will require that the father be given notice unless his parental rights have been terminated. You can visit the court and find out the procedure in your jurisdiction.In most jurisdictions the court will require that the father be given notice unless his parental rights have been terminated. You can visit the court and find out the procedure in your jurisdiction.In most jurisdictions the court will require that the father be given notice unless his parental rights have been terminated. You can visit the court and find out the procedure in your jurisdiction.In most jurisdictions the court will require that the father be given notice unless his parental rights have been terminated. You can visit the court and find out the procedure in your jurisdiction.


You didn't tell the detail how you lost your patenal rights. if you were a good father then no need to regain the rights. try just to find them in your family


Relinquishing parental rights does not terminate one's child support obligation. But if you're the one petitioning this, the court is going to question why you would want to retain it while cutting off his access to the child?


There are different documents and papers that describe a citizens rights. The best document to find such rights is the constitution.


You can relinquish rights, a court decides your obligations.


If you cant find him he cant do anything for you. He cant sign his rights over unless he's there and if you can't find him he can'tAnswerYou haven't provided details such as your age. If you are a minor your mother can petition the family court to have his rights terminated. If he has been missing and has never provided any kind of support the court may allow a termination of his parental rights.


Any parent can give up their parental rights and a lot of them do simply because they believe that once they do, they will not pay child support. This is not the case.... Many states will schedule an investigation in order to find out the reason for giving up parental rights. Also, in many cases, you will still PAY child support even if you have surrendered your rights.


I don't think they let you just sign away your parental rights, there has to be a valid reason, like other parents spouse wanting to adopt child. They don't let you sign over parental rights to avoid paying child support!


If the judge signs the order terminating parental rights, no. However, very frequently judges will not find that termination of parental rights is in the best interest of the child, even if the parent wants to, especially if it is being done as a way of avoiding responsibility.


There are a couple of options. You can give birth and terminate your parental rights therefore letting the father have full custody. Or you can find an agency you want to use (adopthelp.org is great) and your case worker can help convince the father.


this varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction but generally:terminate the unknown father's parental rights. This usually involves posting information in a public way (newspaper, etc) to exercise due diligence in trying to find the father.proceed with the adoption.


If you're in the U.S., you can give up your parental rights, but that won't excuse you from financial responsibility. You will still be ordered to pay child support. Child support is not payment for rights to your child. It's court enforcement of parental responsibility. If paternity or maternity has been established, you'll be ordered to pay child support unless you find someone else to legally adopt the child. So, if you're the father and you surrender parental rights and the mother of the child's new husband or boyfriend legally adopts the child, then you could escape child support payments. But that's the only way.


If you can find someone to sign your rights over to, (you do not sign the rights 'away', you transfer them) then US law can allow you to do this. For example if a couple have a child and then get divorced, and the woman later remarries, she can request that the biological father signs their child's rights over to the new husband. The biological father is then no longer responsible for the child, the new husband is. However a biological father cannot simply abandon his right just because he no longer wishes to support his child.


Consult the laws in the state in which you reside that pertain to parental responsibility. Each state has specific TPR guidelines that a parent must meet before they are allowed to voluntarily reliquish parental rights. Even if the criteria is met the final decision is determined by the presiding judge. If the person is allowed to relinquish their parental rights, they are no longer responsible to financially support the child/children. They also have no rights of visitation, decision making or anything that might relate to the child or children. In addition, a parent cannot be forced to give up their rights to their biological child/children. It is either a voluntary action or the court permanently terminates parental rights due to neglect and/or abuse of the minor child or children. *That is not always true. Each state is different and a lot of states require the parent that is relinquishing rights to continue to pay child support unless the child is being adopted. If it was that easy every dead beat parent would try to relinquish their rights just so they didn't have to pay


In most US states, child agencies take away parental rights for parents that are convicted felons serving prison sentences. They may have their parental rights restored provided their children have not been adopted. Each state treats this situation differently depending upon various circumstances that may be involved. People wishing to regain their parental rights and persons adopting children whose parents have treated them harshly all find that attorneys are needed to unravel the state laws and policies that govern these situations.



How can I find out if my decease father placed us on his life insurance. He remarried and his wife has not forwarded any documents to us


It is possible. An absent parent with visitation rights who never visits with the child may lose those rights and the court may eventually allow a legal adoption by a step parent. If your children are in foster care, and you have a case plan (to get them back), and fail to meet the requirements of your case plan by repeatedly missing visits, you may find your parental rights terminated.


The first thing someone has to do to acquire the rights to a book in order to make it a movie, is to find the author. The author of the book then has to sign legal documents giving the rights to the producers of the movie.


It matters if the father is named on the certificate as the father. If so, then he has as much rights as the mother. But in a court of law you might find the mother has a little more. Only if the mother has a problem will the father get custody. The law see's the mother as the one who the child should live with.


If you're in the US, he has the same rights as any other father, because he is the legal father (biological is irrelevant at this point).


I assume you're questioning your wife or girlfriend's claim of this, as you should. There should be a court record in the county of jurisdiction.


i am trying to find out what rights i have in filing abandonment from the father of my child. what does the Alabama law say?



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