Where did Captain Cook first see a kangaroo?

Lieutenant James Cook (not yet a captain at the time of this incident) first recorded seeing a kangaroo when his ship was wrecked on the Great Barrier Reef near the present day site of Cooktown in 1770. He brought the Endeavour in to what is now the Endeavour River for repairs, and he and his crew spent some six weeks repairing it. On 4 August 1770, the name of the marsupial was recorded as "Kangooroo or Kanguru". The name was derived from gangurru, used by the local indigenous people, the Guugu Yimidhirr, to refer to the Grey kangaroo. Contrary to popular myth, the name does not mean "I don't understand you".
Lieutenant James Cook (not yet a captain at the time of this incident) first recorded seeing a kangaroo when his ship was wrecked on the Great Barrier Reef near the present day site of Cooktown in 1770. He brought the Endeavour in to what is now the Endeavour River for repairs, and he and his crew spent some six weeks repairing it. On 4 August 1770, the name of the marsupial was recorded as "Kangooroo or Kanguru". The name was derived from gangurru, used by the local indigenous people, the Guugu Yimidhirr, to refer to the Grey kangaroo. Contrary to popular myth, the name does not mean "I don't understand you".