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Who accepts low ACT scores?


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Answered 2010-10-14 19:10:23

community college and slum dog private college may accept you if you score low in ACT. don't afraid my dear kids.

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Pepperdine accepts both the SAT and the ACT. If you take the ACT, they recommend that you take the ACT plus writing. THe school does not look at SAT subject test scores.


There is an 88.7% acceptance rate for kent state university. Kent usually accepts students with an ACT score of 21 or higher.


community college and slum dog private college may accept you if you score low in ACT. don't afraid my dear kid


How can I obtain my ACT scores from 1980?


ACT scores are not needed to be accepted


Almost all colleges accept ACT scores or SAT scores.


An ACT online preparatory course will improve your test scores on the ACT.


In 1970, the average ACT scores was about an 18. Now it's like a 21. So its about three points higher. If you got a 28 on your ACT in 1970, it would be the equivalent of having a 31 on your ACT now.


They get low scores because they don't answer enough questions correctly.


Full Sail University does not require SAT or ACT scores.


The state of Georgia has a college that will accept no SAT scores and a low high school GPA (Georgia Perimeter).


Employers don't look at ACT scores. Community colleges usually offer open enrollment for anyone with a high school diploma, and don't require ACT scores. Four-year universities vary widely in what they consider scores acceptable for enrollment.


Test Scores for 2006-2007 SAT verbal scores over 500 70%, SAT math scores over 500 66%, ACT scores over 18 94%, SAT verbal scores over 600 25%, SAT math scores over 600 21%, ACT scores over 24 33%, SAT verbal scores over 700 4%, SAT math scores over 700 3%, ACT scores over 30 2%


* Test scores SAT verbal scores over 500 96%, SAT math scores over 500 100%, ACT scores over 18 100%, SAT verbal scores over 600 69%, SAT math scores over 600 79%, ACT scores over 24 90%, SAT verbal scores over 700 19%, SAT math scores over 700 24%, ACT scores over 30 29%


Add a point or two to your score. The ACT is easier now and groups like Mensa no longer accept those scores for admission, btw.


From Yahoo! Education: ACT scores over 18: 100% ACT scores over 24: 95% ACT scores over 30: 62% From Vanderbilt: "The middle 50% of accepted students score between 1340 and 1510 on the SAT, and between 30 and 33 on the ACT." From the Princeton Review: ACT Composite Middle 50%: 28-32 From Yahoo! Education: ACT scores over 18: 100% ACT scores over 24: 95% ACT scores over 30: 62% From Vanderbilt: "The middle 50% of accepted students score between 1340 and 1510 on the SAT, and between 30 and 33 on the ACT." From the Princeton Review: ACT Composite Middle 50%: 28-32



There is no set ACT requirement for the University of Pittsburgh, and only about 35% submit ACT scores. The middle 50% of students had an ACT score of 25-30, according to College Board.


There are many community colleges that will accept low SAT scores or accept students without an SAT score. Regular colleges will also accept students with low SAT scores if they have some interesting volunteer experience or skill.


yes it would but you must have your scores sent to your high school in order for your counselor to override it in the system. your school counselor will not take your act scores if act does not provide it to them



No, colleges can make you retake the SAT but not the ACT.


Yes actually; there are several websites out there, but I'll help the best I can: (Note: these are all "ish" and relative values for IQ/SAT/ACT scores so give or take some) CLASS | SAT | ACT | IQ | _______________________________ Lower | 750 | 18 |


The minimum ACT score for Morehouse college is a 22.




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