answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2013-04-16 13:53:40
2013-04-16 13:53:40

And you are? If the parents were not married the mother has custody until the father can petition for it after he has proved paternity in court. If married you have equal custody. Just living with you does not give you custody. it has to go through court.

001
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


Parental Custody is whoever the child lives with. Joint custody is when a child lives part time with both parents or when each parent shares in raising the child. They make decisions together.


No. Whether or not you have full custody, the amount is going to be the same, just as long as she lives full time with the mother. The amount is usually based on income guidelines anyway.


A child does not need to be abandoned by their mother for a father to be awarded full custody. If the father can demonstrate before a judge that the mother is unfit to parent, the judge can award him full custody of the child.


If the main part of the custody has been moved to the other parent it's a good idea to look over the custody agreement and with that the child support and to who should get it. If it's just temporary the parents should be able to sort it out themselves. The support should go to the person the child lives with since it's for the child and especially if the child lives full time with one parent.


You may since sole custody implies the child lives with that parent 100% of the time. With joint custody the child may dwell with the other parent for part of the time or with one parent all of the time with visitations for the other parent. It depends on the details and the state child support guidelines.


Length of time a child lives with a parent is not a factor in determining custody or modifying it. Custody is awarded based on the court's opinion of the child's best interests.


Full custody is defined as one parent of a child having sole control over a minor child with the other having no custodial rights. Primary custody means that both parents share custody (also known as joint custody) but the primary custodian is the parent that the child spends most fo their time with/lives with on a regular basis. In other words, the parent that is not the primary custodian is the one that has the visitation rights.


With no courts orders in place, the father has no legal right to have the child living with him. The mother has sole custody and control in all states, and he can still be obligated to pay support for this time period. He needs to immediately file a motion with the court to establish his rights and for at least temporary custody, pending a full hearing, before she gets wind of the fact that she can take the child away from him at any time. see links below.


Yes, the mother can have full custody of the child if the father's name is not on the birth certificate and he has not paid any child support. However, if you just didn't want the father's name on the birth certificate at the time the baby was born, but received child support then you may have trouble getting full custody.


Once you are pregnant your options are as follows:have the baby and become a full time parenthave the baby and give full custody to the fatherhave the baby and share custody and responsibility with the father



Superficially yes. But if someone is still paying child support then they also have custody by rights. Though you would have full and the person paying it would have some time with the child typically


Both full custody parents/guardians have say over the child. However, just because you are someones guardian does not mean that you have full custody of that child all of the time. It simply means you have say so in the childs life. This is how it was when my grandmother had full custody of me, however, my uncles were my guardians. I do not belive this particular law varies from place to place.



If you are a parent and going through the process of a marriage dissolution, or if you are just a parent that has a child with someone you are not in a relationship with, you may want to make sure you understand the different forms of child custody. Each is different and includes different rights as the parent of the child.Sole CustodyIf one parent has custody of the child, this is defined as sole custody. Occasionally courts award sole custody to a single parent if the other is considered to be unfit by drugs or alcohol or issues with child abuse or neglect. Even if the court awards sole custody however, it is not uncommon for the court to also award joint legal custody which means that even though the child resides with one parent, both are required in making decisions regarding the child. In this case, the noncustodial parent has a visitation schedule instead of joint physical custody.Joint Child CustodyJoint custody is also referred to as shared custody and occurs when parents are not together and not living together. Joint child custody usually requires parents to agree upon a schedule for the child and when the child will spend time with each parent. This time also dictates where the holidays, school time, and vacation time is spent, often with it being split between both homes of the parents. Becoming increasingly popular is “bird’s nest custody” in which the parents actually take turns leaving the home and the children stay in one place full time.Sole or Joint Physical CustodyThis form of custody spells out whether one parent or both have the right to have the children live with him or her. Sole physical custody means the child lives with one parent full time while joint physical custody would mean that the child or children lives and spends a certain amount of time with both parents. It is important to note that sole physical custody does not mean the child will not have visitation with the other parent. It simply designates where the child will live.Sole or Joint Legal CustodyLegal custody designates who will make the decisions regarding the upbringing of the children. This may mean anything from deciding the religion to medical care. It is common in most states for parents to share and make the decisions together which results in joint legal custody.It is important when dealing with the custody of a child that you are aware of the different forms of child custody that are available. If you are unsure you should contact a family law attorney.


That is up to a court to decide. The father cannot take that action on his own. He need to petition for full custody. However, if the child has been in a stable and loving home, and well cared for, the court is not likely to terminate the mother's custody at this terrible time unless it can be proven the child is endangered or being neglected.That is up to a court to decide. The father cannot take that action on his own. He need to petition for full custody. However, if the child has been in a stable and loving home, and well cared for, the court is not likely to terminate the mother's custody at this terrible time unless it can be proven the child is endangered or being neglected.That is up to a court to decide. The father cannot take that action on his own. He need to petition for full custody. However, if the child has been in a stable and loving home, and well cared for, the court is not likely to terminate the mother's custody at this terrible time unless it can be proven the child is endangered or being neglected.That is up to a court to decide. The father cannot take that action on his own. He need to petition for full custody. However, if the child has been in a stable and loving home, and well cared for, the court is not likely to terminate the mother's custody at this terrible time unless it can be proven the child is endangered or being neglected.


Certainly some evidence of responsibility (ie paying child support, job, time spent with the child) would help your case. Joint custody, however, is not just for the purpose of reducing child support; infact the child support you pay is nowhere near what it costs to raise a child. Consider the ramifications of your sharing custody--what is in the best interests of the child??



Thank is difficult to answer. It depends on the facts. If the child is in danger, it can happen quickly, if not, years. Please provide more facts as to the age of child, grounds for custody and where each party resides.


It depends on the type of joint custody. Custody is broken down into two subcategories- legal and physical. Legal custody is the ability to make decisions concerning the child and to act on the child's behalf. Physical custody is who the child lives with. Typically unless the child spends exactly 50 percent of the time with each parent, one parent is considered to have primary custody and the other parent to have secondary custody or visitation rights. Child support is based on who has primary physical custody, and that parent is typically awarded child support from the parent who has the child less since having the child more usually means that you provide for more of their needs as well.


The parent that has the child 51% of the time even with a custody order.


Depends on how long and why they went to jail... You can go to family court and say that he/she is unfit... They can get TEMPORARY full custody , pending a hearing in Family Court.


Immediately, ESPECIALLY if she has full custody or the time you plan to spend out of state is part of the time she is supposed to have the child.


There are two types of custody recognized by law: physical and legal.Physical custody pertains to who the child lives with. Legal custody pertains to who is responsible for making decisions on the child's behalf.If you have sole physical custody the child lives with you all the time, although the other parent may be given specific visitation rights allowing them to have the child in their care at certain times and the other parent my have shared legalcustody.If you have sole legal custody you are the parent with the authority to make all decisions for the child: school, choice of doctors and dentists, what kind of medical treatment they receive, what sports they play, etc. If you have shared legal custody both parents have the right to make decisions regarding the child.


Yes, the safe environment of a child always comes first, so your chances of gaining full custody are high.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.