Who is the God of Judaism?

Jews believe in one ethical God, who created the Universe. Modern Jews understand God in many different ways.

The name of God as written in the Torah is not pronounceable, partly due to to a religious prohibition, and partly due to the fact that the pronunciation of the vowels in the name is lost to history. The letters that make up God's name is called "The tetragrammaton"

Answer:

The words Yahweh and Jehovah are of Christian in origin and are NOT used by Jews. There is neither a 'W' nor a 'J' in the Hebrew language.

Judaism has 73 "names" for God but each name is really a description of an aspect. There's one true name for God, spelled YHVH in English. The Hebrew letters are "yud, hei, vav, hei". These four letters are referred to as the Tetragrammaton and are a contraction of the Hebrew words for, "was, is, and will be". His true name was only said in the Temple and with the Temple's destruction we lost the correct pronunciation.

The main obstacle to determining the correct pronunciation is that the letter 'vav' can be a vowel or a consonant sound depending on the word. There is no indication as to what form it takes in the Tetragrammaton.

Answer:

According to Jewish law and custom, the name of God is not pronounced, though many Christians do not have this prohibition, and do not even realize that the Jews still follow this prohibition.

Answer:

The first and greatest "new idea" that Judaism introduced was the strange and revolutionary concept of One God. Now, after more than 4,000 years, that's one of the main ideas that still have a hard time being accepted by people in general: the idea that there is exactly one and only one entity worthy of worship, and that any other concept or entity that may attract the loyalty of individuals or groups ... whether it be money, golf, football, gods, cars,

computer games, running, sex, poker, business, sailing, etc. ... must be subject to the Creator.

God is the one that many of the world's other religions refer to as the "Father".

Jewish people worship the God whom they believe created heaven and earth, and who continues to will it into existence and control all events. In prayers and in scriptures the Jewish people have many titles for God, all showing the highest respect and regard for his being. These include:

  • Adonai
  • Elohim
  • El,
  • Shaday
  • King of Kings
  • El Shaddai (all sufficient)
  • LORD (in English)

It is also important to understand that Jewish tradition prohibits the four-letter name of God (letters: yud hey vav hey) to be spoken aloud except by the High Priest in the Temple, and because the temple in Jerusalem no longer exists, it is never said aloud. God is referred to as HaShem (meaning "The Name") in day-to-day speech, and Adonai is used in prayer services.

Answer:

YHWH - the four letters of the name preserved in Hebrew texts. Since vowels were not included, the exact pronunciation has not been preserved. Some scholars believe that it is pronounced Yahweh; it is not often used. Jehovah is the most widely recognized English pronunciation used only by Christians.

The divine name is a verb, the causative form, the imperfect state, of the Hebrew verb ha•wah', "to become." Therefore, the divine name means "He Causes To Become."

Many translators, for varying reasons, have replaced the proper name with titles, such as Adonai (the Lord) or Elohim (the Supreme, or the true God). This has led to much confusion among Christianity as well as Islam as to what the name of God is; causing many to believe that these titles are actually proper names, despite the fact that in any other context of life - your boss at work and their name, a child's school teacher and their proper name, a cat and the name you gave it - people automatically recognize the difference between a name and a title. But on the topic of God (in these two very large religious spheres), the elementary difference between name and title is cast aside without question by many.

Jews, Christians, and Muslims believe in the same God.

The Jews believe in one ethical God who created the universe (though how modern Jews understand God varies greatly).

According to Jewish law and custom, the name of God is not pronounced, though many Christians do not have this prohibition, and do not even realize that the Jews still follow this prohibition.

Most refer to the name as Yahweh or sometimes Jehovah or Jehova.

It comes from a four letter Hebrew word referred to as the Tetragrammaton [G -> tetra (four)+gramma (letters)], which was used in the ancient texts as the name of the God of Israel. The letters are usually translated as JHWH or YHWH (depending on the language), thus Jehovah or Yahweh. It is suggested that this is God's actual name, rather than a response to Moses' question, "Suppose I go to the Israelites and say to them, 'The God of your fathers has sent me to you,' and they ask me, 'What is his name?' Then what shall I tell them?" (Exodus 3:13, NIV).

According to www.wikipedia.com: During the Babylonian captivity, the Hebrew language spoken by the Jews was replaced by the Aramaic language of their Babylonian captors, which was closely related to Hebrew and, while sharing many vocabulary words in common, contained some words that sounded the same or similar but had other meanings. In Aramaic, the Hebrew word for "blaspheme" used in Leviticus 24:16, "Anyone who blasphemes the name of YHWH must be put to death" carried the meaning of "pronounce" rather than "blaspheme". When the Jews began speaking Aramaic, this verse was understood to mean, "Anyone who pronounces the name of YHWH must be put to death." Since then, observant Jews have maintained the custom of not pronouncing the name, but use Adonai ("my Lord [plural of majesty]") instead.

As a result of this decision, the original pronunciation of the word is somewhat lost. However, in the Jewish Bible, the name appears 6823 times according to the Jewish Encyclopedia. The word is usually replaced now with "LORD" in all capital letters.

Jewish Answer

The Creator has one true name which is represented by the letters YHVH in English. The Hebrew letters are "yud, hei, vav, hei". These four letters are referred to as the tetragrammaton and are a contraction of the Hebrew words for, "was, is, and will be". His true name was only said in the Temple and with the Temple's destruction we lost the correct pronunciation.

In the Tanach (Jewish Bible), there are 72 different 'names' used for The Creator, these aren't actual names though, they're descriptions of Him that are contextual. In daily conversation, most Jews use the name 'HaShem' which literally translates to 'The Name' in reference to His true name.

The words Yahweh, Jehovah, and any variation are Christian in origin and have never been used by Jews. (There is no 'J' or 'W' in the Hebrew language.)

Answer

God's true name's pronunciation is unknown. Typically, however, "Hashem" is used, or Adonai if you're praying.

Answer

Judaism believes in the One God, creator of the world, who gave the Torah.

Answer

The God of Judaism is the same God worshiped in all God religions. He is the one and one God with no partner, no companion, no son, bo father, no associate, and no equivalence. The God whom Prophet Abraham and all God prophets believed in. Which would be the same God as Islam and Christianity.

Judaism is strictly monotheistic, meaning it has one G-d. The Creator has one true name which is represented by the letters YHVH in English. The Hebrew letters are "yud, hei, vav, hei". These four letters are referred to as the tetragrammaton and are a contraction of the Hebrew words for, "was, is, and will be". His true name was only said in the Temple and with the Temple's destruction we lost the correct pronunciation.

HaShem is not a person and has no form.

Jews worship the One God, creator of all things.
Yahweh

The creator of the universe.

Dictionaries define "Judaism" as The monotheistic religion of the Jews, since the founding principle of Judaism was and is the belief in One God. This was the teaching which was spread by Abraham, and has continued since then. From Judaism, belief in One God has spread through the Western world.

In Judaism:

God is One. The concept of a dualism (as in Zoroastrianism), an independent Satan, multiple gods (polytheism; paganism) or a trinity of three in one, are all unimaginable in Judaism. Also, any belief that an intermediary between humanity and God should be used, whether as necessary or even optional, is considered heretical.God is non-physical, indivisible and incomparable. Jewish tradition teaches that God is beyond human comprehension; and that it is only God's revealed deeds, as He interacts with mankind and the world, that we can begin to grasp. His names indicate His attributes and the ways in which He relates to us.

God is omniscient (He is aware of everything), and infinitely wise.
God created the universe and all existence, including time and space, in a deliberate, purposeful act of benevolent Creation.

God is the mover of everything. No molecule can move without the energy and direction with which God imbues it.


God is eternal; and His ways are also eternal. He is not capricious, forgetful or fickle.
God is just. He rewards good and punishes evil - whether in this world or in the afterlife.

God is ethical and moral; and He expects us to imitate His ways.


The God of Israel is the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. He is the guide of history, who delivered the Israelites from Egyptian slavery.

God is the source of law, who gave the Torah to the Israelites at Mount Sinai.

God is immanent and personal, meaning that he relates to humanity and hears our prayers. This is the basis of the Psalms and our siddur (prayerbook).


The names of God:

  • יהוה - the Eternal (see below)
  • Adonai - the Lord
  • Elohim - God
  • Shaddai - the Almighty
  • El - a name indicating the power of God
  • Tzevaot - Lord of hosts
  • Yah (or Jah) - this is a lesser form of God's name יהוה

  • Note:

    God's name in the Torah is יהוה (in Hebrew, not in English). Other names which refer to God (such as Elohim) are more generic (referring to God's power) and can in certain contexts refer to such authorities as judges (Exodus ch.21-22).
    Over the course of the exile, the exact pronunciation of יהוה has been lost. (The usual transliterations, Jehovah or Yahweh, are inaccurate renditions based on a misunderstanding of the the way it is printed in such vocalized texts as Hebrew prayerbooks and printed Tanakhs.)
    The name יהוה is not pronounceable for us, due to to a religious prohibition for Jews (Mishna, Sanhedrin ch.11), and also to the fact that the way in which it would be pronounced is today not known. While the Temple in Jerusalem still stood, only the Kohen Gadol would pronounce this name of God and only one day a year. The remainder of the time, less explicit names of God, including Adonai or Elohim, were used; and that is what we do today also, in prayers, blessings and Torah-reading. In daily conversation in English, we use English words (God, or the idiomatic "Hashem," which refers to God but is not an actual name).