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Answered 2010-12-30 02:12:49

Normal saline is the same as our body which is 0.9% saline. Serious side effects can occur if it did not have the same salt content as our body and in blood transfusions the red blood cells could burst open resulting in a very ill patient and even death. Saline is know as sodium chloride or symbolized as NaCl.

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The only iv fluid used to start a blood transfusion in normal saline.


Normal saline is the only IV fluid which is compatible with our blood. Given before to flush blood from the iv catheter and after to rinse it to make the site patent.


Plain Normal Saline Solution or PNSS is used after blood transfusion because it is the only compatible diluent or 'cleaner' after transfusion. Its sole content of Sodium and Chloride does not cause blood reactions that may be dangerous to the client. D5LRS for example is discouraged as it has calcium which is a clotting factor. Introducing D5LRS after blood transfusion may cause massive thrombosis or clotting. sicnarf619 UCC-College of Nursing PH


Saline. Sometimes referred to as normal saline or 0.9% NaCl.


Yes this saline is a hypertonic solution but 3% saline is also not normal. There is nothing "normal" about it. There is only one "normal saline" and that is 0.9%.


normal saline composition is same as body fliud


The only IV fluid that can be administered simultaneously w/ blood is Normal Saline Solution 0.9%.


Only if it is legal where you are.


No, you can only receive your blood type when you get a blood transfusion.


Red blood cells are the blood component most frequently used for transfusion. RBCs are the only cells in the body that transport oxygen. A transfusion of RBCs increases the amount of oxygen that can be carried to the tissues of the body.


A person with type O blood can only get a transfusion using type O blood. Someone with type A or B blood, however, can get a transfusion with their own type blood or with type O blood, which is known as a universal blood type.


This person should only receive blood from a person of the same blood group. If the person did get this transfusion, a hemolytic transfusion reaction will occur after a secondtransfusion from the same Rh+. This person is now has made D antibodies and those will cause the blood to clot.


No, HIV can only be transmitted by blood transfusion or sex.


For a red cell transfusion, the answer should be group A.


Transfusion of your own blood (autologous) is the safest method but requires planning ahead and not all patients are eligible. It is usually only an option for elective surgery.


Briefly, and only if massive quantities of a different type are transfused.


You have the osmolarity or the osmolality of the blood is equal to the RBC in your blood. That is about 154 millimole or milliosmole, with only slight variation, depending of the water consumption. So the RBC do not burst in your body. They will not burst either, in isotonic or human normal saline. That means in 0.9 % saline solution.



the nurse is responsible for insuring that the right unit of blood is to be administered to the right patient after typing and crossmatching by the lab. this is done by checking the lot, serial numbers, blood type, and expiration date with another nurse or qualified lab personnell. then the unit of blood has to be checked off with another nurse before administration. only registered nurses are allowed by law to administer blood products. before administering the unit, the nurse cannot obtain consent, the doctor has to get consent forms signed by the patient or a qualified representative of the patient, except in the cases of trauma or life saving situations if the patient is unable to make that decision, all pros and cons must also be explained by the doctor. all patients have the right to refuse transfusions. after consents are signed and the blood is checked by appropriate personnell, the nurse has to take a complete set of vital signs for a baseline. after starting the transfusion, the vital signs must be checked after 15 minutes, then 30 minutes from then, then at one hour. then vital signs must be checked every hour, according to hospital protocol. the vital signs are checked this often to monitor for a reaction to the blood. if a reaction occurs, then the transfusion must be stopped immediately and normal saline infused. blood can only be transfused with normal saline. some hospitals may give premedications before transfusion to reduce the chance of a reaction. a unit of whole blood (packed red blood cells) must be infused over 3.5-4 hours, but not over 4 hours from the time of the start of the transfusion. Source(s): i am a registered nursethe nurse is responsible for insuring that the right unit of blood is to be administered to the right patient after typing and crossmatching by the lab. this is done by checking the lot, serial numbers, blood type, and expiration date with another nurse or qualified lab personnell. then the unit of blood has to be checked off with another nurse before administration. only registered nurses are allowed by law to administer blood products. before administering the unit, the nurse has to get consent forms signed by the patient or a qualified representative of the patient, except in the cases of trauma or life saving situations if the patient is unable to make that decision. all patients have the right to refuse transfusions. after consents are signed and the blood is checked by appropriate personnell, the nurse has to take a complete set of vital signs for a baseline. after starting the transfusion, the vital signs must be checked after 15 minutes, then 30 minutes from then, then at one hour. then vital signs must be checked every hour, according to hospital protocol. the vital signs are checked this often to monitor for a reaction to the blood. if a reaction occurs, then the transfusion must be stopped immediately and normal saline infused. blood can only be transfused with normal saline. some hospitals may give premedications before transfusion to reduce the chance of a reaction. a unit of whole blood (packed red blood cells) must be infused over 3.5-4 hours, but not over 4 hours from the time of the start of the transfusion. Source(s): i am a registered nurse


Yes. The only requirement is for the blood collection facility to irradiate any cellular blood products prior to transfusion to prevent transfusion-associated Graft Versus Host Disease.


Nothing. O blood is the universal donor, which means any blood type can get O blood in a transfusion. Although this is true blood type O can only receive blood type O. This is because Blood type O has no antigens but has both antibodies A and B.



If a patient has lost a lot of blood, the patient would probably need a transfusion of "whole blood", which includes red blood cells and plasma. However, sometimes the patient only needs an increase in volume of liquid in the bloodstream, in which case plasma alone can be submitted.



My guess would be to give a blood transfusion of platelets only. They will soon come back, but its great to give blood.



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