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Answered 2015-03-18 22:22:00

Statistically, the odds of an abuser changing are low. So the short answer is yes, those with a history of abuse will likely abuse their subsequent partners. However, there are key indicators you can watch for in a person who is taking an honest interest in changing their abusive behavior:

1) They acknowledge that they are abusive, and that it is their responsibility, and not the fault of anyone else that they are they way they are.

2) They admit that they WANT to change, and that they know the process of change is very difficult

3) They undergo a violence/abuse assessment, delivered by a professional who focuses on these things. The abuser is willing and wanting to follow the recommendations of the assessment.

4) They voluntarily enter programs specifically oriented around addressing abusive and/or violent behaviors. These group programs generally are extensive, and may run from a minimum of 16 weeks to 52 weeks in length. Jointly, they should also attend individual counseling that is specific to the challenges they have in addressing their behavior and emotional challenges.

5) The process for change is hard, and can be long. How long depends on the individual, their readiness for change, and ability to integrate the change.

6) The individual will tend to this change in an ongoing process which may be lifelong.

The process for changing abusive tendencies is intense, very difficult (because it is rooted in learned behaviors that likely spanned significant portions of their childhood), and due to the extraordinarily low level of community support due to the morally reprehensible nature of this behavior, the individual will find the path to rehabilitation difficult to maintain despite their initial best interests and convictions.

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they usually will abuse their next partner if the wrong buttons are pushed. the new partner could be covering up the abuse due to fear or embarrassment. in rare cases the abuser could be truly remorseful and seek help. good luck, and remember violence is never acceptable. Adding further you are yet to see the minus points/conflict of interest in the new partner. Closer u r the more u see. Any way abuse is not justified whjihc maybe due to inheritance.


Well it doesn't usually start off with hitting. It usually starts with put downs then escalates into yelling & screaming. Next comes throwing things or daminging your property (especially things that mean a lot to you). Pushing and grabbing are next and then almost always it will lead to hitting. There is no such thing as physical abuse without mental and emotional abuse. The entire time the abuser is breaking down the partner in every way they can come up with. This is a very serious and scary situation & no matter how hard it is you should never stay with someone that hurts you.


Probably the most common form of abuse is verbal abuse. next would probably be physical abuse. :(


In a case of no will, the next of kin has priority. Unless there is a will, the unmarried partner will not have any rights.


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there are no garentees but there is a good chance that he will out of habit. This does really bother me


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Character is something you develop. Apologize, do something nice for your partner, and do better next time.


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Yes you can. There is a RED button next to the question usually. That says report abuse.


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they stare at you,is ether really nice to you or really mean to you,in PE class hil wanna be on the same team as you,he will want to be your partner in science class or when the teacher in science class ses you have to be his partner he will act like its the end of the world and every where you look he will be there lokkinat you you. (btw that's is a boy likes you) if a girl likes you: she will always kik or punch you in the gut or both,be me to you,constantly stare at you,always next to you,and wherever you look shes there.



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