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2006-05-18 05:03:03
2006-05-18 05:03:03

If you are willing to charge this driver with auto theft it probably will. If not, the insurance company will assume you are giving him permission after the fact.

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It is my understanding from my insurance company that if I "give permission" for someone to drive my vehicle and I have full coverage then my vehicle is covered. Recommend you ask your insurance carrier this question, they will be happy to give you an answer regarding your policy.


If you are underage you need your parent's permission.


I sense that this person driving your car without permission is a resident of your household. Without a police report of the theft of your vehicle then the person driving your car, especially if they are a resident of your household and reasonably knew where to find the keys, would have presumptive permission to use the car and your insurance will have to pay.




First of all a friend does not borrow your car without your permission- if they used it without your permission they really arent your friend and they technically stole your car- Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle- Their insurance will cover them only if you file a complaint with the police stating that the person did not have your permission to use the car. Otherwise your insurance will cover the loss and your rate may jump or you may get cancelled. Your call- depends on how much the claim is and how good the friend is


Technically, the insurance company should cover the costs of the other vehicle. If the unlicensed driver took the vehicle without permission, the owner may even be able to collect on the collision insurance to cover part of their expenses, but if he/she does that he/she will probably have to show a police report that the unlicensed driver took the vehicle without permission and that it was technically, automobile theft. On the other hand, the insurance costs for the owner may to up dramatically whether the owner gave permission or not. It all depends on the insurance company and how they view the circumstances. The unlicensed driver may not be allowed to get a drivers license for several years, depending on state laws.


I would not drive a man's car if his wife said I couldn't no matter what. Legally, the person who is the policyholder on the insurance and the owner of the vehicle has to give you permission to drive. If you drive it on a regular basis, you must be listed as a driver on the insurance policy. If you drive the car without permission, and have an accident, you will not have coverage under the insurance policy.


If you file a claim, I'd expect an increase in the premiums. It's not likely that the policy would be cancelled, unless this is a common occurrence.


Not without the permission of the underage individual's parents or legal guardian.


With permission of the owner of the vehicle and the property, you could do so without legal consequences. However, if you did something to damage that vehicle or caused damage to property with that vehicle, insurance would reject the claim.



Who knows. Even if they do, you have no insurance coverage and they have wasted their money. The insurance company can not and will not pay any claims arising out of any incidents with a vehicle that does not belong to to the policyholder. Purchase your own insurance. It is a legally binding contract in which you state that you own the vehicle and that you have listed all household members and/or drivers and that you agree to notify the insurance carrier of any changes to such.


California is a mandatory insurance state. Under California tort law you would be able to be sued for not having insurance as mandated by law.


If your child has a license the insurance on the car will probably cover it. The company can take the position that they were not supposed to be driving it and are not covered in which case it would come back to you because the child is underage.


well underage kissing isn't illegal but if it is done by a underaged person without parent's permission it might be "illegal" under their rules. So, it really isn't illegal.


Yes, it is illegal to drive without insurance or without having sufficient insurance in Arizona. You will have 30 days to provide proof of insurance following an accident.


re: auto insurance, no; auto insurance is written on the vehicle, not on a person.


Report them to the police as a runaway. Until they reach the age of 18, they are the responsibility of the parents.


No. You must have parental permission to get married until you are 18. You may be able to get a court order to allow it, but there are going to have to be other factors for them to do it.


Yes vehicle tracking devices can be used on your vehicle without your knowledge. If you find this to be the case and it was not put there by the police it is illegal.


can the grand mom and her son take a life insurance policy out on me and his children without my {legal wife} permission


Technically yes and no. While they can't actually add the driver, they can rate the insurance coverage as if that person would be driving a vehicle. For example, if you had a child who had just gotten their license, and you named them as an excluded driver of your vehicle, yet they somehow managed to get into a small wreck and have to file a claim, your insurance carrier would likely deny the claim on the basis that the driver was excluded, as well as rate your policy as if they were going to be driving the vehicle, without actually adding them. Moral of the story... don't lie to your insurance company.


Unless the vehicle was taken without your permission, I hope so. Allowing your vehicle to be driven by an unlicensed driver is a serious judgment error, the kind that insurance companies do not like to underwrite.


Yes, especially if your spouse pays towards the insurance benefits out of his/her check.



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