answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

No. President John Adams nominated William Marbury as a justice of the peace under the newly passed Organic Act of 1801, just two days before the end of his administration. John Marshall was Secretary of State under Adams at the time, and was responsible for processing the paperwork and arranging for Marbury's commission to be delivered, but he ran out of time and left the deliveries for James Madison (the incoming Secretary of State) to complete.

Marshall expected the commissions to be sent out as a matter of routine, but the new President, Thomas Jefferson, found them and (presumably) destroyed a number of them. Marbury's and his three co-plaintiffs', were among those not delivered.

Case Citation:

Marbury v. Madison, 5 US 137 (1803)

For more information, see Related Questions, below.

User Avatar

Wiki User

13y ago
This answer is:
User Avatar

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: Did John Marshall nominate William Marbury as a federal judge?
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
Continue Learning about American Government

How was the power of judicial review established?

The Marshall CourtAlthough judicial review is a carryover from British common law and in use well before the United States had a Supreme Court (and thereafter, before the Marbury v. Madison case), the Marshall Court is generally credited with establishing the legitimacy of its use in the new federal government. Fourth Chief Justice John Marshall claimed the right of judicial review for the Judicial Branch of government in his opinion for Marbury v. Madison, (1803).Case Citation:Marbury v. Madison, 5 US 137 (1803)


How did the supreme court decision in marbury version madison strengthen the federal judiciary?

The Supreme court decision on Marbury version Madison by the federal judiciary. This is part of the court systems.


What action did William Marbury take to get Jefferson and Madison to deliver his commission?

William Marbury brought suit to secure his position as a Justice of the Peace in Washington D.C. The appointment was one of the last minute "Midnight Judges" assignments made in the waning hours of the Adams' administration pursuant to the Organic Act of 1801 (not to be confused with the Judiciary Act of 1801, which reorganized the federal courts and added sixteen new circuit judges).Specifically, Marbury wanted the Supreme Court to issue a "Writ of Mandamus" (a judicial order compelling a government official to carry out the duties of his office) to Jefferson's Secretary of State James Madison. Marbury wanted Madison to deliver his commission so he could take office.Chief Justice John Marshall (Jefferson's second cousin) ruled that, while Marbury's appointment was legal, the Supreme Court lacked original jurisdiction over the case, preventing them from ordering the executive branch to do anything. Marshall told Marbury he would first have to pursue the case in a lower court, then petition the US Supreme Court under its appellate jurisdiction if his grievances weren't addressed.Marshall also ruled that Section 13 of the Judiciary Act of 1789, passed under George Washington, was unconstitutional. By declaring an Act of Congress unconstitutional, Chief Justice Marshall affirmed the court's right of "judical review."Marbury did not get his job.Case Citation:Marbury v. Madison, 5 US 137 (1803)For more information on Marbury v. Madison, see Related Questions, below.


What branch is being checked when president appoints a federal judge?

The president's power to nominate federal judges is a check on the judicial branch by the executive branch.


Who wanted the Judicial branch of the federal government to have the power to interpret the US Constitution?

Fourth Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court, John Marshall. This idea is clearly stated in his opinions, beginning with Marbury v. Madison, (1803).For more information, see Related Questions, below.

Related questions

What did chief justice Marshall's landmark decision to the power of federal government?

Chief Justice Marshall is best known for his opinion in Marbury v. Madison, (1803).


What did John Marshall believe about the structure of the government?

John Marshall was a federalist who believed in a stronger federal government. As a Chief Justice, John Marshall, helped shape the supreme court by granting it, and the federal government, more power than previously thought. (Marbury v. Madison, McCulloch v. Maryland)


What is the big deal with Marbury vs Madison?

Marbury V Madison (1803) established the concept of judicial review. John Marshall, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court at the time, was a Federalist, and all his rulings strengthened the power of the federal government over that of the individual states. In Marbury V Madison, Marshall ruled that the Supreme Court had the power to declare both decisions by lower federal courts, and laws, unconstitutional.


What did the decision in the case of marbury v Madison define?

Chief Justice John Marshall's opinion in 1803's Marbury v. Madison established the principle of judicial review - the ability of federal courts to find a federal or state law inconsistent with the US Constitution.


Did Marbury's case ever go to the lower federal courts?

No. William Marbury filed a petition for a writ of mandamus (an order compelling an official to take - or refrain from taking - a legal action) with the US Supreme Court, which is the head of the federal court system.The Judiciary Act of 1789 assigned original jurisdiction to the Supreme Court for writs of mandamus against government officials, which Chief Justice Marshall decided was not the Constitution's intention. According to Marshall, Marbury's case was not within the Court's jurisdiction; he would have to file with the lower court (District Court) for relief.Marbury never refiled his case.Case Citation:Marbury v. Madison, 5 US 137 (1803)


Which of the following is not part of Justice John Marshall's legacy?

The decision in Marbury v. Madison, which established the principle of judicial review, is a key part of Justice John Marshall's legacy.


Who nominated William Marbury as a federal judge?

Marbury v. Madison, 5 US 137 (1803)President John Adams nominated William Marbury as a justice of the peace under the newly passed Organic Act of 1801, just two days before the end of his administration.For more information, see Related Questions, below.


How was the power of judicial review established?

The Marshall CourtAlthough judicial review is a carryover from British common law and in use well before the United States had a Supreme Court (and thereafter, before the Marbury v. Madison case), the Marshall Court is generally credited with establishing the legitimacy of its use in the new federal government. Fourth Chief Justice John Marshall claimed the right of judicial review for the Judicial Branch of government in his opinion for Marbury v. Madison, (1803).Case Citation:Marbury v. Madison, 5 US 137 (1803)


How did the supreme court decision in marbury version madison strengthen the federal judiciary?

The Supreme court decision on Marbury version Madison by the federal judiciary. This is part of the court systems.


Did john marshall deliver a series of the most momentous decisions in American judicial history?

Yes. "During Jefferson's term of office, the power of the Supreme Court was increased. William Marbury, one of the judges appointed by Adams before he left office, had not been granted his commission of office prior to the change of administration. Marbury asked the Supreme Court to compel Secretary of State James Madison to grant him his commission. Chief Justice John Marshall recognized that if he and the justices approved Marbury's request, Madison might not follow the Court's orders, thus weakening the people's respect for the judiciary. If the justices rejected Marbury's request, however, the Republicans would have an apparent victory. Marshall managed to avoid both political pitfalls. In his decision, he stated that Marbury deserved the commission but that the Court was powerless to make the Secretary of State deliver it because of a conflict between the Constitution and the Judiciary Act of 1789. Marshall's decision in Marbury v. Madison was a blow to the Republicans, but it strengthened the federal judiciary by establishing the principle that the Supreme Court could declare acts of Congress unconstitutional. This ruling was the first of many important decisions made by John Marshall during his thirty-five years as Chief Justice." (Switched on Schoolhouse: History Unit 3. The Revolution of 1800)


What action did William Marbury take to get Jefferson and Madison to deliver his commission?

William Marbury brought suit to secure his position as a Justice of the Peace in Washington D.C. The appointment was one of the last minute "Midnight Judges" assignments made in the waning hours of the Adams' administration pursuant to the Organic Act of 1801 (not to be confused with the Judiciary Act of 1801, which reorganized the federal courts and added sixteen new circuit judges).Specifically, Marbury wanted the Supreme Court to issue a "Writ of Mandamus" (a judicial order compelling a government official to carry out the duties of his office) to Jefferson's Secretary of State James Madison. Marbury wanted Madison to deliver his commission so he could take office.Chief Justice John Marshall (Jefferson's second cousin) ruled that, while Marbury's appointment was legal, the Supreme Court lacked original jurisdiction over the case, preventing them from ordering the executive branch to do anything. Marshall told Marbury he would first have to pursue the case in a lower court, then petition the US Supreme Court under its appellate jurisdiction if his grievances weren't addressed.Marshall also ruled that Section 13 of the Judiciary Act of 1789, passed under George Washington, was unconstitutional. By declaring an Act of Congress unconstitutional, Chief Justice Marshall affirmed the court's right of "judical review."Marbury did not get his job.Case Citation:Marbury v. Madison, 5 US 137 (1803)For more information on Marbury v. Madison, see Related Questions, below.


What did the Marbury v Madison case provide?

The Marbury v. Madison case was decided in 1803 during the term of US President Thomas Jefferson. At this time a landmark US Supreme Court case was decided. The court established the principle that the court could declare a law passed and signed into law by the president to be unconstitutional. The details are as follows;In the majority opinion handed down by chief justice Marshall, the court ruled against Federalist William Marbury. According to the ruling, he could not force Secretary of State Madison to sign a commission so he could have the federal office to which the outgoing President Adams had appointed him. This seemed controversial in that it seemed the court was surrendering by the Federalist Marshall to the powerful Jefferson wing in US politics. Marshall ruled that the reason Marbury could not have his commission was that a portion of the Judiciary Act of 1789 that gave the Supreme Court the power to issue such writs was unconstitutional. It was the first time the Supreme Court had exercised the power of judicial review. It was a courageous by Justice Marshall. By seeming to give in to Jefferson and Madison on what was really a minor point, Marshall had assumed a powerful weapon to use against his political friends in Virginia.