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27 amendments

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Betty Wilderman

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2y ago
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16y ago

6 Six Amendments have been proposed by Congress but never gained enough States' votes to be ratified. They are: One of the first amendments in the Bill of Rights laying out representation, one outlawing titles of nobility, one guaranteeing a state's right to practice slavery, one that gives the Federal Government control over child labor laws, The Equal Rights Amendment, and one that would have given DC full representation in the House and Senate. All of these amendments failed.

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14y ago

Six Amendments have been proposed by Congress but never gained enough States' votes to be ratified. They are:

  1. #1 of the first twelve amendments passed, laying out a formula for representation in Congress (ten of these passed immediately & became known as the "Bill of Rights", one other finally passed as the most recent - 27th -amendment)
  2. outlawing titles of nobility (1800)
  3. one

    guaranteeing the federal govt would not interfere with slavery in the states (1861, the 'original 13th amendment' - was meant to simply restate the current understanding of the Constitution, that only states themselves could outlaw slavery, as an attempt to bring back recently seceded Southern states)

  4. giving the Federal Government control over child labor laws (1924)
  5. The Equal Rights Amendment (first proposed in 1923, passed Congress in 1972 with an express deadline for ratification, which it failed to meet)
  6. one to give Washington DC full representation in the House and Senate (1978, expired in 1985)
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14y ago
Amendments proposed but not ratifiedSince the Constitution was adopted, there have been 27 amendments added and 6 which have NOT been ratified. The following have been offered by Congress but not ratified by the states:
  • 1789 - Re-apportionment. Still open for ratification. [Defines a number limit of constituents for Representatives, i.e., 30,000; 40,000; 50,000; etc. This would allow an unlimited number of seats in the House. -- Instead of re-apportionment, the House would just add members as the population increases.]
  • 1800 - Titles of Nobility. Still open. [If anyone accepts a title, i.e., King, Duke, Baron, Earl, etc., citizenship is forfeited. This proposal was printed by the government as part of the Constitution (as though it had been ratified) from the time it was proposed until about 1850 when the error was discovered. It has not been ratified.]
  • 1861 - Guaranteeing the federal govt will not interfere with slavery in the states. Still open [but moot, since Amendment XIII outlawed slavery in 1865]
  • 1924 - Child Labor. Still open. [Gives Congress the power to regulate child labor.]
  • 1972 - "Equal Rights Amendment" (ERA). Expired after one extension. Here is the whole proposal:
"Section 1. Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex."
  • 1978 - District of Columbia - Same Vote in Congress (House & Senate) as the States. Expired after 7 years.
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15y ago

Since the first Congress in 1789, the House and Senate have mustered the necessary two-thirds majority needed for only thirty-three amendments to the Constitution. Of these, twenty-seven have been ratified by the states, leaving just six unratified:

* The Congressional Apportionment Amendment (1789), * The Titles of Nobility Amendment (1810), * The Corwin Amendment (1861), * The Child Labor Amendment (1924), * The Equal Rights Amendment (1972), and * The D.C. Voting Rights Amendment (1978).

The last two have expired, each having contained a seven-year time limit for ratification. The remaining four are still technically available for states to ratify.

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15y ago

The most important one in U. S. history was never ratified , so then what can be said of what has been built on the back of something that never was?

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13y ago

27

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Q: How many amendments have been ratified?
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Related questions

How many amendments to the constitution have been ratified?

only 27 of the 31 amendments proposed have been ratified


How many constitutional amendments have been ratified?

27 have been ratified


How many economic amendments have been ratified?

one


How many other amendments have been passed since the constitution was ratified?

17


As of 1997 how many amendments had been made to the constitution?

26. The 27th Amendment, proposed in 1789, was not ratified completely until 1992, almost 203 years later.


How many changes or amendments are there to the constrtution?

Including the Bill of Rights the constitution has been amended 27 times. Many other proposed amendments have not been ratified.


What are the two amendments that were not ratified?

During the course of our history, in addition to the 27 amendments which have been ratified by the required three-fourths of the States, six other amendments have been submitted to the States but have not been ratified by them.


How many times has the US Constitution been amended?

The United States Constitution was written in 1787 and ratified in 1788. It has 27 amendments, but the first 10 were ratified simultaneously in 1791 so it was amended one time with ten amendments. The other 17 amendments were ratified one at a time. So the US Constitution has 27 amendments but has been amended 18 times.


How many constitutional amendments have been propose how many have been passed?

since the Constitution was adopted, there have been 27 amendments added and 6 which have NOT been ratified. this meaning that there were a total of 33 amendments proposed but only 27 were passed. Matt Damon Out


Which amendment was passed first and by how many years?

The first ten amendments were presented and ratified with the Constitution. The Constitution would probably not have been ratified without the rights guaranteed to the states and people in these amendments, which are called the Bill of Rights.


How many of the amendments were ratified by the state legislatures and how many were ratified by conventions held in the states?

Only the 21st Amendment (repealing the 18th) was ratified by conventions in the states.


How many of the original 12 amendments were ratified?

13