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Absolute magnitude is based on an observer being at the same distance from any star.
Apparent magnitude is based on the brightness of a star from Earth without any atmosphere.

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Q: Is a star's absolute magnitude dependent on its distance from the observer?
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What is a stars brightness as if it were a standard distance?

Theres `Absolute Magnitude` which is the brightness of a star at a set distance. Then there is `Apparent Magnitude` which is the apparent brightness from earth, regardless of distance.


What is higher for closer stars A absolute magnitude B red shift C parallax D blue shift?

The answer would be C) Parallax.The Absolute Magnitude of a star is the star's actual brightness, and is therefore not dependent upon the position of the observer.Red Shift and Blue Shift are consequences of a stars speed relative to the observer. Again this is independent of the stars proximity to the observer.Parallax, is the apparent change in position based upon the motion of the observer, and is directly proportional to the proximity of the object. Just as, when driving on the road distant trees or buildings don't appear to zoom past you as quickly as a pedestrian on the side of the road, so it is with stars. The closer they are the larger the parallax is as the Earth orbits the Sun, for example.


What is an apparent magnitude?

Earth's apparent magnitude would depend on where it is viewed from. For instance, from Saturn, the apparent magnitude is 1.45. From Mars is would be somewhat higher.


What characteristic of a star is determined by its distance from the observer?

It's apparent size, heat, and gravitational force.


05. What two parameters does the brightness of a star depend on?

The brightness of a star - or apparent magnitude [See related question] is how bright a star is as viewed from Earth. Therefore, if we have two stars of similar luminosity but one is twice as far away, then the further star would appear dimmer than the closer star. There are more luminous stars than our Sun but because the Sun is a lot closer, it is brighter. So the brightness of a star depends on it's luminosity and it's distance from the observer. A stars luminosity is a factor of how hot it is, and how big it is.

Related questions

What is a stars brightness as if it were a standard distance?

Theres `Absolute Magnitude` which is the brightness of a star at a set distance. Then there is `Apparent Magnitude` which is the apparent brightness from earth, regardless of distance.


What does the apparent motion of objects in the sky depend?

The apparent motion of objects in the sky depends on the motions of Earth.


What is it called when brightness is how bright a star seems or looks?

The brightness of a star to an observer on Earth is called it's Apparent Magnitude. The intrinsic brightness of a star is known as it's Absolute Magnitude.


What is higher for closer stars A absolute magnitude B red shift C parallax D blue shift?

The answer would be C) Parallax.The Absolute Magnitude of a star is the star's actual brightness, and is therefore not dependent upon the position of the observer.Red Shift and Blue Shift are consequences of a stars speed relative to the observer. Again this is independent of the stars proximity to the observer.Parallax, is the apparent change in position based upon the motion of the observer, and is directly proportional to the proximity of the object. Just as, when driving on the road distant trees or buildings don't appear to zoom past you as quickly as a pedestrian on the side of the road, so it is with stars. The closer they are the larger the parallax is as the Earth orbits the Sun, for example.


What is the distance from the observer to the launch pad?

The distance is 500feet


How can 2 stars of the same apparent magnitude could have different absolute magnitudes?

The less luminous one is closer to the observer, just as a candle in the same room can seem as bright as a sodium vapor lamp down the street.


How is light intensity like gravity?

The intensity of light from a point source measured by an observer and the magnitude of the forces of gravity between two masses are both inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. And so is the magnitude of the forces between two electric charges or two electrically-charged objects.


What is path difference?

The path difference is the difference in the physical distance between the two sources to the observer, i.e., the difference in distance travelled from the source to the observer.


What information can light reveal about stars?

How big, bright, far away, old, and how big our galaxy is, they teach us about how big our universe COULD be, how big our galaxy is, if there our new stars forming in our galaxy, and about *Quasars. They learn alot about space with star light, ecspecially because of alberts einsteins theory on the speed of light, or if you perfer *light years. *Quasars- Some scientists belive they are a beginning of a new galaxy, it takes over a billion years for the light to reach earth, it takes over 8 minutes for light from the sun to reach earth. * Light years is the amount of time it takes light to reach earth, or anywhere for example since takes 8 minutes for light to reach earth (this is inacerite) it might take is 20 minutes for light to reach mars or light years. (If all this confuses you leave a comment and I will simplify it for you.)


Why relativistic mass is not a scalar quantity?

Because mass is observer dependent with it being tied to energy via E=mc^2 (and energy is certainly observer dependent). Rest mass however, IS the same for every observer. To be a little technical this is because the rest mass is a Casimir operator for the Lorentz group.


How is the size of an object affected by its distance from an observer?

Its size is not affected in the least by its distance from an observer. If it were, can you possibly imagine thestress and strain on Brett Favre's body during a game, as he is watched by 60,000 people in the stands, allat different distances from him ? ! ?The object's APPARENT size ... i.e. the angle that it subtends at the eye of the observer ... depends onthe observer's distance from it, in the following totally predictable and purely geometrical fashion:The angle subtended by the object =arctangent [ (object's dimension perpendicular to the line of sight) divided by (observer's distance) ].But that's the observer's fault, not the object's.


Why can two stars can have the same apparent magnitude and different total magnitudes?

Two different stars with different luminosity may appear to have the same brightness to an observer because the brighter may be more distant. This illustrates the need in astronomy to help range distant stars; since apparent magnitude alone will not yield enough information to gauge distance. The establishment of a "standard candle" or object of known brightness can be used for comparison; these can be established through various means including statistical models, observation of variable stars, behavior of nearby supernovae, etc. Once the distance of a star is known, the absolute magnitude can be derived from the apparent magnitude using the inverse-square law.