answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

The above includes what was the first line written under "impressions" on my radiology report related to an MRI done w/o and with Contrast which I was given recently. I'm going to see my neurologist today, but can tell you what I know now. The doctors I've spoken with so far expressed concern, then some calming words such as, "the report wasn't conclusive," as the radiologist had included a number of possible reasons for the results. However, I've since read the fact I had an MRI six years ago during which this foci was not present, this presents a problem. The fact the foci is in the periventricular area typically suggests a diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis. However, my neurologist ask to look at the films himself, to confirm this foci or lesion, is new. If it is indeed a new lesion, this signifies a diagnosis of either Multiple Sclerosis or another demyelinating disease. (Note: I had a "small foci" of "abnormal T2 Flair" rather than being scattered. )

User Avatar

Wiki User

11y ago
This answer is:
User Avatar
More answers
User Avatar

AnswerBot

3d ago

This indicates the presence of small areas of increased signal intensity in the brain's white matter on a T2 FLAIR MRI sequence. These areas are typically seen around the ventricles and deep regions of the brain, suggesting possible small vessel disease or demyelination. Further evaluation may be needed to determine the underlying cause.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

12y ago

It could be related to prior infection, trauma, inflammation, or

demyelinating disease.

This answer is:
User Avatar

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: What does this mean Scatterd foci of T2 FLAIR signal hyperintensity in the periventricular deep and subcortical white matter?
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
Continue Learning about Biology

What is Two punctate foci of T2 hyperintensity in the subcortical white matter of the lateral anterior left frontal lobe?

This finding typically indicates small areas of increased fluid content in the brain's white matter, usually due to conditions like small vessel disease or microvascular ischemia. Further evaluation may be needed to determine the specific cause and significance of these hyperintense foci.


What does low density area in subcortical white matter of left posterior parietal lobe mean?

A low density area in the subcortical white matter of the left posterior parietal lobe could indicate a region of decreased cellularity or myelin loss. This may be associated with conditions such as demyelinating diseases, vascular damage, or other pathologies affecting the white matter in that specific brain region. Further investigation with clinical correlation is necessary to determine the underlying cause.


What are the Functions of subcortical region of brain?

Cortical is a word referring to the cortex, so the subcortical region of the brain is literally 'anything beneath the cortex'; but, since the brain isn't arranged in flat layers, it may be easier to visualise this analogy: If you picture the brain as being half an orange, the outer skin (the zest) would equate to the grey matter of cerebral cortex, & the inner skin (the pith) to the white matter; everything else (the pulp & the pips of the orange) represents the subcortical structures, which include various ventricles & nuclei, the thalamus, hypothalamus, cerebellum, & the parts that make up the brainstem. Subcortical pathways enable fast, unconscious reactions; so a reflex is a subcortical action.


Where are the cell bodies of cerebral neurons housed?

the cerebral neurons are housed in the cerebrums outer region called the CEREBRAL CORTEX


What makes up the gray matter of the brain?

The gray matter of the brain is composed of cell bodies of neurons, including dendrites and synapses. It is responsible for processing information in the brain and is more prominently found in the cerebral cortex and subcortical nuclei.

Related questions

What does it mean the brain parenchyma shows periventricular T2 hyperintensity and a few scattered subcortical foci of increased T2 and flair signal intensity in the frontal lobes that are nonspecifi?

what does this mean? Impression: There are scattered foci of T2/FLAIR hyperintensity within the periventricular, deep and subcortical white matter. The findings are nonspecific but may be seen in mild to moderate small vessel ischemic changes. No evidence for acute infarct or hemorrhage.


What is mild diffuse cerebral and cerebellum volume loss and T2 hyperintesnity within the periventricular white matter?

Mild diffuse cerebral and cerebellum volume loss and T2 hyperintensity within the periventricular white matter refers to a stroke. This can cause a slight decrease in the white matter of the brain.


What is multiple small hypo densities seen in bilateral fronto-parietal subcortical and periventricular white matter?

Small hypo densities are seen in bilatereral para ventricular region


What is foci of T2 hyperintensity in the subcortical and periventricular white matter?

This phrase is a statement that would be used by a radiologist when reviewing the results from a MRI. Breaking down the phrase by individual parts:T2 - An indication of the type of scan that was done. In a T2-weighted scan, areas that are fluid-filled appear bright, while areas that are fatty appear dark. A T1 scan would show the opposite results.Hyperintensity - An indication of a bright region on the scan.Foci of T2 Hyperintensity, therefore, means "focal points, or concise areas, of very bright spots."Subcortical and periventricular white matter - These are locations within the brain. Regions of the brain are categorized by color (white matter or grey matter) and location (cortical, or related to the cortex, subcortical, or below the cortex, etc).The statement, therefore, means "white spots on a MRI scan at certain locations within the brain."This statement alone does not indicate any particular disease is present. It is a piece of information that a neurologist would use to help determine whether or not someone had a certain disease or condition. There are many conditions or diseases which can cause white spots on the brain; only a neurologist can sort through the possibilities and determine what caused these white spots.


What is the ICD-10 code for periventricular white matter lesion?

The ICD-10 code for periventricular white matter lesion is I69.819.


What is Two punctate foci of T2 hyperintensity in the subcortical white matter of the lateral anterior left frontal lobe?

This finding typically indicates small areas of increased fluid content in the brain's white matter, usually due to conditions like small vessel disease or microvascular ischemia. Further evaluation may be needed to determine the specific cause and significance of these hyperintense foci.


What could a bilateral periventricular white matter hypodensities in the brain mean?

What does this mean in easy to understand terms


Function of white matter in the brain?

White matter in the brain consists of nerve fibers (axons) that connect different parts of the brain to each other and to the spinal cord. It acts as a communication network, allowing neurons in different brain regions to send signals and work together to carry out various functions such as motor coordination, sensory processing, and cognitive tasks.


What does low density area in subcortical white matter of left posterior parietal lobe mean?

A low density area in the subcortical white matter of the left posterior parietal lobe could indicate a region of decreased cellularity or myelin loss. This may be associated with conditions such as demyelinating diseases, vascular damage, or other pathologies affecting the white matter in that specific brain region. Further investigation with clinical correlation is necessary to determine the underlying cause.


What does it mean when they find a Lesion seen within subcortical white matter tracts of the posterior left frontal lobe?

Subcortical white matter lesions may be associated with cardiovascular disease. They may also be associated with multiple sclerosis, if the patient has other MS signs and symptoms.


Are the limbic and subcortical regions of the brain the same?

No, limbic and subcortical regions are different areas of the brain. The limbic system is a set of interconnected brain structures involved in emotions and memory, while subcortical regions refer to all regions beneath the cerebral cortex, which includes the limbic system as well as other structures involved in functions like movement and reward processing.


What are the Functions of subcortical region of brain?

Cortical is a word referring to the cortex, so the subcortical region of the brain is literally 'anything beneath the cortex'; but, since the brain isn't arranged in flat layers, it may be easier to visualise this analogy: If you picture the brain as being half an orange, the outer skin (the zest) would equate to the grey matter of cerebral cortex, & the inner skin (the pith) to the white matter; everything else (the pulp & the pips of the orange) represents the subcortical structures, which include various ventricles & nuclei, the thalamus, hypothalamus, cerebellum, & the parts that make up the brainstem. Subcortical pathways enable fast, unconscious reactions; so a reflex is a subcortical action.