answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

Wikipedia: "The word werewolf is thought to derive from Old English wer (or were) and wulf. The first part, wer, translates as "man" (in the sense of male human, not the race of humanity). It has cognates in several Germanic languages including Gothic wair, Old High German wer, and Old Norse verr, as well as in other Indo-European languages, such as Sanskrit 'vira', Latin vir, Irish fear, Lithuanian vyras, Spanish viril and varon, and Welsh gŵr, which have the same meaning. The second half, wulf, is the ancestor of modern English "wolf"; in some cases it also had the general meaning "beast." An alternative etymology derives the first part from Old English weri (to wear); the full form in this case would be glossed as wearer of wolf skin. Related to this interpretation is Old Norse ulfhednar, which denoted lupine equivalents of the berserker, said to wear a bearskin in battle." There are also other thought origins, which you can find at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Werewolf#Etymology

User Avatar

Wiki User

โˆ™ 2009-02-20 00:31:20
This answer is:
User Avatar
Study guides

Economics

20 cards

Which economic system calls for a maximum of private ownership

This civilization emerged as a strong city-state between 250 BC and 99 BC

About when were the plow wheel and bronze writing created

In England during the seventeenth century the first real push to develop new technology was in this field

โžก๏ธ
See all cards
2.52
โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…โ˜†โ˜…
21 Reviews

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: Origin of the word werewolf
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
People also asked