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Weight is dependant upon gravity and the relationship to large bodies of mass such as planets. However, if you were to be put into a vacuum on the surface of the Earth, you would way less. There is air pressure pushing down on you and that would add some weight. It also pushes up on parts of you. The difference is not likely to be very significant, but it should be measurable. However, I don't volunteer to be the person in the vacuum chamber! I am not a scientist, but I believe that you would weigh very slightly more in a vacuum. Think of our atmosphere as being a liquid of very low density compared with water. An object that floats in water displaces water in the amount of the object's weight; if you put a scale under a floating object, the scale registers the object's weight as zero. A perfectly bouyant object has the same density (specific gravity) as water, and as such will have a substantial weight if measured on land. But it will have no weight if weighed in water. An object that sinks in water will have weight, but it will weigh its land weight minus the weight of water displaced by its volume. This should be the same for a person (in a pressure suit, of course). The person will not be bouyed up at all by the atmosphere.

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16y ago
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13y ago

An object will weigh more in vacuum than in air because of the upthrust. There is no upthrust in vacuum whereas in air the pressure pushes an object or person from all sides. The air is dense and it is similar like water where the weight of an object is equal to the weight of the water displaced by it.

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7y ago

There is a buoyant force in water that largely counteracts gravity. Since the human body is about the same density as water, buoyancy just about completely cancels out the force you feel from gravity, effectively rendering you almost weightless. Since air is so much less dense than water the buoyant force you experience is negligible.

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13y ago

This is because there is no upthrust in vacuum so the gravitational force is the weight. In water, there is an upthrust which gets subtracted from the gravitational force. Therefore a body always weighs more in vacuum than in air.

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15y ago

Air helium however is an ellement and a part of air.

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12y ago

objects weigh more in vacuum than in air due to buoyancy of air.

objects displace air equal to their volume and this reduces their weight.

in vacuum, there is no displacement.

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13y ago

In space.

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Q: Why do objects weigh more in vacuum than in air?
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