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Big Dipper

Throughout time, the Big Dipper has been a major navigational tool. It has been recognized by many societies, and by many names. It consist of seven stars, most notable, the North Star, Polaris.

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What is the big dippers position in the solar system?

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The Big Dipper is a prominent asterism in the constellation Ursa Major. It is a group of stars visible from Earth and is not a part of the solar system, which consists of the Sun, planets, and other celestial bodies orbiting the Sun.

What is the big dipper myth?

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The Big Dipper is not based on a myth, but rather a celestial asterism that forms part of the constellation Ursa Major. The stars in the Big Dipper have been used by various cultures throughout history for navigation and storytelling, but there is no specific myth associated with the formation of the Big Dipper itself.

What time of year is it the best to see in the Big Dipper in Montana?

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The Big Dipper is visible in Montana year-round, but it is most prominent during the spring and summer months. The best time to see it is during the late evening or early morning hours when it is higher in the sky and easier to spot.

What is the part of a constellation called that is easily recognizable like the big dipper?

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That part of a constellation is called an asterism. Asterisms are smaller groupings of stars within a constellation that form recognizable patterns or shapes. The Big Dipper is an example of an asterism within the larger constellation Ursa Major.

How much does the big dipper cost?

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It's a group of stars in the sky and they are Not for sale. You can't buy them.

All constellations are close to the Big Dipper?

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Not all constellations are close to the Big Dipper. The Big Dipper is part of the Ursa Major constellation and many other constellations are spread across the night sky at various distances from the Big Dipper.

What is the difference of the Big Dipper in a week?

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The Big Dipper is a circumpolar constellation, meaning it is visible year-round. Over the course of a week, its position in the night sky will change slightly due to Earth's rotation. However, these changes will be minimal and not easily noticeable without careful observation.

Are big dipper and ursa major different constillations?

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No, the Big Dipper is a prominent asterism within the constellation Ursa Major. Ursa Major is the constellation, while the Big Dipper is a recognizable group of stars within that constellation.

How do you find Saturn in relation to the big dipper?

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To find Saturn in relation to the Big Dipper, locate the Big Dipper in the sky, which is usually visible in the northern hemisphere. Then, draw an imaginary line from the two end stars of the Big Dipper's bowl and continue in that direction. Saturn should be visible along this line, usually appearing as a bright yellowish star-like object.

Pitcher of big dipper in sky?

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The "Big Dipper" is not an actual pitcher in the sky, but rather a group of bright stars that form part of the constellation Ursa Major. Its distinctive shape resembles a large ladle or drinking cup and is a familiar sight in the northern hemisphere. The stars of the Big Dipper are often used as a guide to locate the North Star and other celestial objects.

The constellation that is driving the big bear and that you follow the arc of the handle of the big dipper to arc the acturus its alpha star?

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The constellation that contains the Big Dipper is Ursa Major, also known as the Great Bear. To find the star Arcturus, you can follow the arc of the handle of the Big Dipper and it will lead you to this bright, orange giant star in the constellation Boötes.

Earths distance from the big dipper?

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The Big Dipper is actually a group of stars in the constellation Ursa Major, which is approximately 80 light years away from Earth. The distance can vary slightly as the stars in the Big Dipper are not all at the same distance from us.

Why is the big dipper a symbol on the Alaskan flag?

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The Big Dipper represents the strength and endurance of Alaska's Native people. It is an important cultural symbol in Alaska, reflecting the significance of the celestial bodies in traditional indigenous beliefs and navigation. The Big Dipper also symbolizes Alaska's location in the northern hemisphere and its connection to the Arctic region.

If you look at the big dipper at two different hours of the same night is its orientation position in the sky the will it change?

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Yes, the orientation of the Big Dipper will change slightly over the course of the night due to Earth's rotation. The stars in the night sky appear to move in a circular pattern around the celestial pole, causing the Big Dipper to gradually shift position.

What planet is closest to the big dipper?

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The planet closest to the Big Dipper in our solar system is Earth. The Big Dipper is just a pattern of stars in the constellation Ursa Major, whereas planets like Earth orbit the Sun.

Why cant a person in Antarctica use the big dipper to find the north direction?

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In Antarctica, the Big Dipper is not visible because it is located in the Northern Hemisphere. Therefore, individuals in Antarctica cannot use this constellation to find the north direction. Instead, they would typically rely on other methods such as a compass or GPS to determine direction.

WHY DOES the big dippers location change?

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The Big Dipper's location changes in the night sky because of the Earth's rotation. As the Earth spins on its axis, different constellations appear to rise and set, creating the appearance of movement in the sky. This phenomenon is known as diurnal motion.

What is the positions of the Big Dipper during the four seasons?

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The Big Dipper is visible year-round in the Northern Hemisphere. During the spring, it is high in the sky in the evening. In the summer, it is low in the north around midnight. In the fall, it is visible in the early evening to the northwest. In the winter, it can be seen low in the north in the early evening.

Why is the Big Dipper shaped like a bowl with a crooked handle or a big spoon?

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The Big Dipper is an asterism in the constellation Ursa Major, formed by seven bright stars. Its shape appears like a bowl with a handle due to the relative positions and brightness of these stars. The stars Alkaid, Mizar, and Alioth form the handle, and the four stars in the quadrilateral shape create the bowl.

The big dipper appears at 9pm on which day of the month?

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Here's a rough table:

October 1: . . 12:00 Noon
November 1: 10:00 AM
December 1: . 8:00 AM

January 1: . 6:00 AM
February 1:. 4:00 AM
March 1: . . . 2:00 AM

April 1: . . 12:00 Midnight
May 1: . . 10:00 PM
June 1:. . . 8:00 PM

July 1: . . . . . . 6:00 PM
August 1: . . . 4:00 PM
September 1: 2:00 PM

General approximate rule for stars:
Wherever you see a star at some time tonight, as the dates pass, it will be in the same place about 4 minutes earlier each night, 1 hour earlier after 2 weeks, 2 hours earlier after a month.

Is Alioth a white star in the big dipper?

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Epsilon Ursae Majoris (Alioth) is the brightest star in the constellation Ursa Major (Big Dipper).

It has a spectral class of A0 which means it is a white to white-blue star.

Why does the big dipper have 7 stars?

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The Big Dipper actually has 7 bright stars, but it is made up of a total of 7 stars. The brighter stars form the "bowl" of the dipper, while the fainter stars make up the "handle." The number of stars that make up the Big Dipper is just a coincidence based on their arrangement in the sky.

Explain why the big dipper and the little dipper are not separate constellations?

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The Big Dipper and the Little Dipper are not separate constellations but are parts of the same constellation called Ursa Major. The Big Dipper is an asterism, a recognizable star pattern within a constellation, while the Little Dipper is another asterism within Ursa Major representing Ursa Minor. Together, they form one larger constellation in the night sky.

What 2 stars in the big dipper point to the north star?

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The two stars in the Big Dipper that point to the North Star are Dubhe and Merak. If you draw a line from Merak to Dubhe and continue that line onward, it will lead you to the North Star, also known as Polaris.

What are the greek names for the stars of the big dipper?

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The Greek names for the stars of the Big Dipper are as follows:

  1. Alkaid
  2. Mizar
  3. Alioth
  4. Megrez
  5. Phecda
  6. Dubhe
  7. Merak