Calvinism

Calvinism, which is also called the Reform Tradition, is one of the major and oldest branches of Protestantism and formed primarily in opposition to both the Catholic Church and the Rise of Lutheranism, composing many different Protestant sects. Calvinism primarily stems from the teachings of John Calvin. One of the distinctive teachings of Calvinism is the concept of Predestination, meaning that God has already chosen those who will go to Heaven or Hell and that there is no free will for a person to change their fate through works.

Asked in Christianity, Reformation History, Last Supper, Calvinism

John Calvin's view of the Lords Supper?

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Calvin tried to avoid what he considered two major errors. First, that the wine and bread were supernaturally turned into the essence of the body and blood of Jesus (Roman Catholic belief) and second that the Supper was a memorial to someone who died a long time ago. Therefore, he emphasized that the Lord's Supper was a remembrance of Christ, held in obedience to Christ's command, and that the risen Christ is fully present with the celebrants and that they do receive spiritual nourishment from Him through this sacrament. From Wikipedia (see link) ...... Calvin defined a sacrament as an earthly sign associated with a promise from God. He accepted only two sacraments as valid under the new covenant: baptism and the Lord's Supper (in opposition to the Catholic acceptance of seven sacraments). He completely rejected the Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation and the treatment of the Supper as a sacrifice. He also could not accept the Lutheran doctrine of sacramental union in which Christ was "in, with and under" the elements. His own view was close to Zwingli's symbolic view, but it was not identical. Rather than holding a purely symbolic view, Calvin noted that with the participation of the Holy Spirit, faith was nourished and strengthened by the sacrament. In his words, the eucharistic rite was "a secret too sublime for my mind to understand or words to express. I experience it rather than understand it."
Asked in History of France, Calvinism

What is huguenots?

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huguenots was the name for the protestants in the 1600s and 1700s in France.
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Is Lecrae a Calvinist?

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Yes, as well as Trip Lee, Sho Baraka, Tedashii, Flame, and the Feat. Rockstar on Lecrae's album Mark Driscall.
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When was Calvinism started?

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Calvinism was a continuation of the Reformist movement. google, When did calvinism begin?
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What were the main ideas of John Calvin and how were they expressed in the government of Geneva?

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calvin believed in predestination- the idea that a soul was destined from birth to go to heaven or hell he also believed in a very strict moral code, evidenced by his tightly run community in Geneva in which everyone had to go to church every day, dancing, gambling, alcohol and other 'unholy' acts/icons were prohibited, and bed times were set by government
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Is Calvinism Biblical?

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It is my understanding that one loosely defined tenet of Calvinism is that persons cannot be freed from sin, and will continue to sin in this life. I. John 3:4 Whosoever committeth sin transgresseth also the law: for sin is the transgression of the law. 5. And ye know that he was manifested to take away our sins: and in him is no sin. 6. Whosoever abideth in him sinneth not: whosoever sinneth hath not seen him, neither known him. 7. Little children, let no man deceive you: he that doeth righteousness is righteous, even as he is righteous. 8. He that committeth sin is of the devil; for the devil sinneth from the beginning. For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil. 9. Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin;. . . Is sinning Biblical? Calvin beleived in predestination. Some christians say this is right, others say it is wrong, but realistically, you can justify many different views in the Bible, it depends who is interpreting. Calvinism was not exclusively John Calvin's teaching. Calvin's teachings were based from scripture and he did not justify sinning at all. He taught that sinners are saved by faith in Jesus Christ through grace that comes from God himself and those who He saves He (God) chose before the fondations of the world to be conformed to the image of His Son. No one is saved apart from hearing the gospel. Upon being saved the there is a perpertual conflict within the believer between the old sin nature which is never completely done away with, and the new spiritual nature planted by God (Romans 7). Sinning is not biblical but the bible says that believers sin because of the sin nature inherited from Adam, but there is a new drive in a believer towards righteousness induced by the indwelling Holy Spirit. The apostole John never dealt with the exceptions in his writtings, he implied that a believer does not practice sin (does not live a pattern of sin) and it is him who said that "if we say that we have no sin we decieve ourselves and the truth is not in us, but if we confess our sins God is faithful and just to forgive and cleanse from all unrighteousness" 1 John 1: 8,9.
Asked in Calvinism

Who was John Calvin?

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John Calvin, 1509-1564 Born about 26 years after Luther, Calvin was one of the key reformers of the 1500s. His main centre of activity was the city of Geneva in Switzerland. In the longer term, his version of the Reformation was also very influential in the Netherlands, Scotland, among the French Huguenots - and in America. See Related Links See the Related Link for "Wikipedia: John Calvin" to the left. Answer (the following was extracted with permission from the Positive Atheism website) John Calvin (1509-1564) Protestant reformer who, nevertheless, continued to work for the Roman Catholic Inquisition "Let it stand, therefore, as an indubitable truth, which no engines can shake, that the mind of man is so entirely alienated from the righteousness of God that he cannot conceive, desire, or design any thing but what is wicked, distorted, foul, impure, and iniquitous; that his heart is so thoroughly envenomed by sin that it can breathe out nothing but corruption and rottenness; that if some men occasionally make a show of goodness, their mind is ever interwoven with hypocrisy and deceit, their soul inwardly bound with the fetters of wickedness." ........John Calvin, dicsuccing free will in Institutes, Book 2, end of Chapter 5; quoted from Dr Jonathon Host, personal letter to Cliff Walker (July 7, 2003), thanks for taking the time to share these findings with us! †† "Who will venture to place the authority of Copernicus above that of the Holy Spirit?" ......John Calvin, pointing to Psalm 93:1 in his Commentary on Genesis "[Those who assert that] the earth moves and turns ... [are motivated by] a spirit of bitterness, contradiction, and faultfinding; [possessed by the devil, they aimed] to pervert the order of nature." .....John Calvin, sermon no. 8 on 1st Corinthians, cited in William J Bouwsma, John Calvin: A Sixteenth Century Portrait (1988), quoted from The Talk Origins Archive, "Cretinism or Evilution?: The Evils of Copernicanism" John Calvin was a French pastor and theologian, during Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in Calvinism.
Asked in History, Politics & Society, Similarities Between, Calvinism

What were the similarities between Luther and Zwingli?

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Martin Luther and Zwingli had the same beliefs of the way a "True Church" should be. They both questioned the honored traditional teachings and practices as fasting, transubstantiation, the worship of saints, pilgrimages, purgatory, clerical celibacy, and certain sacraments.
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What type of people were attracted to Calvinism?

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Back to the Bible types who were fed up with man-made, made up religions.
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What exactly is Calvinism?

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Calvinism is a system of Christian belief developed by the reformer John Calvin. At it's simplest, it consists of five points which make up the acronym TULIP. They are: Total Depravity Unconditional Election Limited Atonement Irresistible Grace Perseverance (or Preservation) of the Saints
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Why did Calvinism form?

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Calvinism was based on new reform movement that began in France, adopting a position mid-way between the Lutherans and Zwingli. Calvin worked in Geneva from 1541 until 1564 and promulgated these ideas in the French-speaking areas of Switzerland. He advocated a theocratic state, where the state enforced ecclesiastical doctrines, discipline and morality.
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Who started Calvinism?

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John Calvin was the person who started Calvinism, it was named after him. He was a French Protestant theologian who lived from July 10, 1509 - May 27, 1564. See the link below for more information on his life and teachings.
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Why does the Reformers Wall statue of John Calvin have his finger in the Bible?

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Probably because Calvin fundamentally believed in opening the scriptures to all. Also possibly because it might have been his preaching style to have his finger mark the place where his text was so that he could return to it easily.
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Was Elizabeth Calvinist?

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No, while she was a Protestant, she was definitely not a Calvinist.
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Which city did John Calvin call the City of God?

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Calvin is said to have called the Swiss city of Geneva the "City of God" as it was there that Calvin persuaded the civil leaders to pass laws according to Calvin's understanding of biblical moral principles.
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How many kids did John Calvin?

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1 biological child but died right after
Asked in History of France, Calvinism

In what period of time were the Huguenots invited to work in Prussia?

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In 1686, almost immediately after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (in 1685).
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In what city was a famous edict issued tolerating Calvinists in France around 1600?

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Answer The city was Nantes, France. King Henry IV issued the famed Edict of Nantes, which gave toleration to Huguenots (as French Calvinists were called). :)
Asked in History of France, Calvinism

What is the huguenot cross?

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The Huguenots did not use symbolism in their worship, but since they were persecuted they needed a way to be able to recognize each other. Huguenots carried the crosses with them to be able to identify each other. Interestingly enough, the Huguenot cross originated with the Catharists who many believe are the ancestors of the Huguenots of Southern France. Read: 'Huguenots and Jews of the Languedoc'. The Huguenot cross is also the same symbol used by the Occitans (Languedoc) in their flag. The huguenot cross is a Christian religious symbol originating in France and is one of the more recognisable and popular symbols of the evangelical reformed faith. It is commonly found today as a piece of jewellery. Symbols: The cross as an eminent symbol of the Christian faith, represents not only the death of Christ but also victory over death and impiety. This is represented also in the Maltese Cross. It is boutonné, the eight points symbolising the eight Beatitudes (Matthew 5:3-12) Between the arms of the cross, the stylised fleur-de-lys (which on the French Coat of Arms represent the Trinity) represent the crown of thorns. The fleur-de-lys together with the arms of the cross form the shape of a heart, which symbolises the sufferings of Christ. The pendant dove symbolises the Holy Spirit (Romans 8:16)
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John Calvin preached that salvation was granted by?

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John Calvin preached that salvation was given by the grace of God through faith in Jesus Christ. That no man is saved through anything which is within himself or another person but only through the work of Jesus as He died as an atoning sacrifice for the sins of all who would believe.