IRA Plans

Tax-advantaged retirement savings plans including the traditional IRA, Roth IRA, SEP IRA, SIMPLE IRA, and self-directed IRA

2,159 Questions
IRA Plans

Who is roth shield?

They are the family controlling the world ecomony

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401k and 403b Plans
IRA Plans

How long does it take to get distribution from fidelity 401k?

I work for Fidelity so can tell you that it depends. Your old employer may require paperwork. If so, it could take around 21 days before you get a check. If your old employer does not require paperwork then it takes about 7 days.

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IRA Plans

What does RMD mean when refering to IRA?

Required Minimum Distribution or RMD is the amount you have to withdraw from you IRA or 401K, etc. beginning at age 70 1/2 per year (it can be divided into 12 monthly payments per year) or the IRS will charge you a 50% penalty for not withdrawing the RMD amount. The reason is the IRS wants you to pay taxes on your IRA or 401K by age 70 1/2 or you will be penalized a 50% penatly for not using that money. You cannot just leave it there forever. This applies only on pre-tax products that you have never paid any taxes on. A Roth IRA is not included because taxes were paid on that money before it was set aside for retirment. It is not Pre-tax but Post-tax. There is a formula you have to use to calculate and RMD by IRS rules and regulations. You can access such a calculator at the following: https://www3.troweprice.com/retailtools/rmdcalc/public/rmdStart.do?distYear=2011&beneDob=

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Celebrities
IRA Plans

Is asher roth Tim roth's son?

When I first saw his picture I though "that has't to be Tim Roth's son but I did a google search and there does not seem to be a relation. Tim Roth actually only has three sons who are named Jack, Timothy, and Cormac. (Tim Roth's name was originally Tim Smith so there is very little chance of relation)

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Income Taxes
IRA Plans
US Air Force

Can you cash in interest on IRA CD?

Any withdrawal amounts from your IRA account would be a taxable distribution from your IRA account and if you are under the age of 59 1/2 the taxable amount will be subject to the 10% early withdrawal penalty plus income tax at your marginal tax rate on the taxable amount.

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IRA Plans

Which of these statements about the IRAs is false?

IRA accounts are only available at banks

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IRA Plans

Can you close out an Roth IRA account?

yes, but it would be a distribution with penalties if not needed age.

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IRA Plans

Is Asher Roth related to JD Roth?

Asher Roth is not related to Wired magazine journalist Daniel Roth, as far as one can tell from reading his articles. There is very little rhyming.

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IRA Plans

What is an IRA?

  1. An IRA is an account set up at a financial institution that allows an individual to save for retirement with tax-free growth or on a tax-deferred basis. There are three main types of IRAs-Traditional, Roth, and Rollover-each with different advantages.
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Long Term Care Insurance
Student Loans and Financial Aid
Taxes and Tax Preparation
IRA Plans

What is POST-TAX?

it means you are paying or contributing monies 'post' or after all taxes have been with held from your pay check........ maybe you are talking about a 401k? you can on most contribute, pre or post tax........

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IRA Plans

Can employers make contributions to roth IRA?

Yes and no, if an employer contributes to your Roth IRA directly the employer must report it as income to you. Since it is income they must also report it to uncle sam as taxable income and the employer will have to pay payroll taxes on the contribution. They can not pay into a Roth as the employer, so that answer is NO. Most employers will not want to deal with the potential IRS reporting nightmare this can have. That being said, the're companies that offer PDP, payroll deduction plans. These plans are employee funded through the employees paycheck. The funds can be used to fund any type of account, i.e Roth, IRA, 529 and so on. The Employer then sends one check monthly to the company of choice based on the amount each employee has withheld from thier individual pay checks, hence payroll deduction.

If the employer is looking to offer this as a benefit to it's employee or key employee the employer would increase the employee's pay to match the amount the employer wishes to contribute to the employee. But ultimately it looks like the employee is making the contributions.

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Investing and Financial Markets
401k and 403b Plans
IRA Plans
Airbus

Is a 457 subject to required minimum distribution?

Yes, unless the person in question is still working and contributing to the plan

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New York City
IRA Plans
Unemployment Benefits

Can you collect unemployment in New York city and contribute to an IRA your parents are legally able to give you a 'gift' of 12000year and you want to put it in an IRA without jeopardizing your unempl?

Your problem is that you can only contribute $2000 or so to an IRA and you have to have income to do it. The remainder of the gift will count as income, and that will not coexist with your unemployment. Perhaps they could keep the gift until you find a job. They won't get the same tax writeoff, but maybe that will work.

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IRA Plans

Can you close an IRA account?

Yes you can close the account. However if you simply take the money, then you will owe not only regular income taxes on it, but you would be subject to a 10% penalty as well. Unless it is a qualified distribution in which the penalty could be avoided. If you want to simply "move" the money into another IRA then you can do that penalty free by filling out account transfer forms at the receiving institution.

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Investing and Financial Markets
Income Taxes
IRA Plans

What is a simple IRA?

SIMPLE IRAA SIMPLE IRA is a retirement plan for small businesses.

"A salary deferral retirement plan established by an employer with 100 or fewer employees who received $5000 or more in compensation in the preceding year."--Schwab

Employees defer part of their pay into the plan and the employer either matches a certain percentage or makes a non-elective contribution.

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IRA Plans

How would the average person ever be in a higher tax bracket when they retire than when they're working and this scenario seems to be the only reason to get a Roth IRA?

This is true. Historically income tax rates have changed substantially over the years for the same levels of income. We have our busy legislators to thank for this. Having a Roth essentially locks in today's tax rates / structure. A non-Roth assumes that the money will be taxed at a lower rate in the future, which is a pretty big assumption. Will it? Who knows. But I'd bet good ol' US $ that the tax rate structure will be quite different in 20-30 years. It always has been... Sometimes higher, sometimes lower. Ideally, I would like to have a mix of retirement accounts, both Roth and traditional for just this reason. There are several other reasons to have a Roth other than what future tax bracket you will be in. My personal opinion is that if you are eligible to contribute to a roth (there are income restrictions) and you don't need an immediate tax deduction, the roth will generally be your better long term bet. Yes, we could all use a reduction in our taxes this year, but I'd rather use a tax-free account rather than a tax-deferred account. Of course the tax-deferred account is better than nothing. Consider the comparison of SOME of the differences between a Roth IRA and a regular IRA (as always, consult your tax advisor BEFORE contributing to either): Regular IRA: - MAY be able to deduct current year contributions from current year Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). - Tax deferral of any interest earned or capital gains realized until distribution (withdrawl from the IRA). - May start taking distributions, without penalty, once you reach 59 1/2 years old. - MUST start taking Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) at age 70 1/2. Roth IRA: - MAY NOT deduct contributions. - Any interest earned or capital gains realized that are distributed after age 59 1/2 are done so ****TAX FREE**** as long as you have held the contributions in the Roth for at least 5 years! - May start taking distributions, without penalty, once you reach 59 1/2 years old. - DO NOT HAVE TO take ANY Distributions EVER. All that money growing for the last how many years can stay in a non-taxable account if you never need it. This means it can then be passed to your heirs instead of having to be withdrawn and taxed while you're alive (as is the case for a regular IRA). If you are not making too much money to qualify, if you ARE getting a refund, if your tax bill is low enough that an immediate deduction will have little or no impact, and/or if you can simply afford to pay your taxes without it being a burden too high to handle, go with the roth. The one other factor can be age (5-10 years). If you are pretty close to retirement, a roth may not be appropriate. In most cases, I think it makes more sense to pay a little in taxes now (not take the AGI deduction) so you don't have to pay ANY later. Also, if you need money for any reason, you can always take out your principle(the monies that u placed into the Roth), without penalty- even prior to 5yr and 59 1/2 restrictions

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Retirement Planning
IRA Plans
Social Security

Can you contribute to your IRA if you are drawing social security?

You can contribute to an IRA if you are not yet 70 1/2 and have some source of W-2 / 1099 self employment income. Social security payments are NOT considered income that can be used to contribute to an IRA.

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IRA Plans

Roth IRA vs traditional IRA?

When it comes to making financial decisions, one that is confusing to many is the choice between a Roth IRA and a traditional IRA. This can be a complex discussion filled with caveats and exceptions, special cases and conversion decisions. I’m not going to get into all those details here. I simply want to explain with this post the main difference between a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA.

First, let’s tackle the traditional IRA. Here’s an account that promises tax benefits. You put money into it and you can claim a tax deduction when you file taxes for the amount of money you added to the account. In essence you get to put the money in pre-tax. Even though you may have had taxes withheld from that money initially you get it back when you file.

That’s not the only tax benefit of the traditional IRA. Once the money is in the account it will (hopefully) grow. If in a regular brokerage account the interest, dividends, and realized capital gains the account accrues would be taxable within the year they occur. So as the money grows you’d be forced to pay taxes on that growth. But if the money is invested in a traditional IRA, all of that growth is tax-free. (Technically, it’s tax-deferred because, as you’ll soon see, there is a tax bill coming.) You don’t pay taxes on the growth at the time it is happening. So when do you pay taxes on this money? You have to pay taxes on it when it is withdrawn. As you take withdrawals from the account, presumably in your retirement years, the withdrawals are taxed to you as income.

The Roth IRA also enjoys the tax-free growth. If you understand the traditional IRA then the Roth is simple. Instead of the money being taxed at the back end when you take withdrawals, it is taxed up front. So in the case of the Roth IRA, you take after-tax dollars and invest them in the account. Since you’ve already covered the taxes on those dollars, in the Roth, the money grows tax free and when withdrawn is also tax-free. The Roth IRA allows you to get your taxes out of the way up front and not to have to worry about paying taxes on your retirement income.

So which is better? It depends entirely on your unique situation and what is going to happen in the future. Since none of us knows the answer to the latter, I suggest discussing the former with a financial professional and coming to decision that is right for you.

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History of Ireland
Germany in WW2
IRA Plans

What exactly was the IRA?

Answer "IS the IRA"

The provisional Irish Republican Army, or IRA, is an outgrowth of an older group known as the Irish Republican Army, which fought an insurgency that successfully challenged British rule in the whole of Ireland in the early years of the twentieth century. The 1916-1921 warfare culminated in the creation of an independent Irish Free State in 1921. But in exchange for its independence, the old IRA's leadership agreed to allow Ireland's six northern counties to remain under British rule. Britain reconstituted these provinces as Ulster or Northern Ireland, and inside the IRA, significant elements rejected this partition and launched a civil war ultimately won by the rejectionists. Ties between the Free State and Britain remained chilly into the 1970s. Meanwhile, the old IRA maintained a low level campaign of violence aimed at reuniting Ireland. By the 1960s, however, its activities had dwindled significantly.

In the late 1960s, developments in Northern Ireland hastened the declining influence of the old guard. Reacting to discrimination against Catholics in the British-ruled province, civil rights marchers engaged in civil disobedience and were met by violent crackdowns from the Protestant-dominated police force, the Royal Ulster Constabulary. Tensions rose and Britain deployed regular army troops to the province's streets, ostensibly to protect the Catholic minority. These tensions split the IRA, too, which in 1969, the IRA splintered into two groups, the Dublin-based "officials," who advocated a united socialist Ireland by peaceful means, and the Belfast-based "provisionals," who vowed to use violence as a catalyst for unification.

At first, the provisional IRA, or "provos" conducted sniper attacks, assassinations, and several small bombings in the province, and appeared to have little public support. Then, in January 1972, British troops opened fire on a Catholic rally in Londonderry, killing fourteen unarmed people. PIRA recruitment soared, and the official wing of the organization fell away into obscurity. Their violent comrades proceeded to launch a series of bombing campaigns around Northern Ireland and in Britain targeting both military targets and civilian populations. So-called "Loyalist" groups determined to retain British rule sprung up to challenge them, and in the crossfire, together with British military and Northern Irish police forces, some 3,600 people would die before a peace accord was signed in the late 1990s. Today, the IRA's political wing, Sinn Fein, which means "Ourselves Alone" in the Gaelic language, holds various positions within the provincial Northern Irish government. The Royal Ulster Constabulary has been disbanded, Loyalist groups largely have laid down their arms, and most British troops have left the province.

Answerthe IRA has had various incarnations. the "old" IRA up until 1923 believed that the political route to Irish independence would not succeed without a military element. some believed that there should only be a military solution. after 1923 some of the IRA accepted the de facto partition of Ireland and entered politics in the republic as the fianna fail party led by eamon de valera. a minority persisted with the armed struggle until the 1990s - the provisional IRA led by gerry Adams etc. AnswerThe Irish Republican Army is an unsanctioned Irish military force that fights for Northern Ireland's independence from English occupation. They are a controoversial and violent group. You can find out more about them using the following link:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_Republican_Army - 82k -

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Taxes and Tax Preparation
Income Taxes
IRA Plans
The Difference Between

What are the tax implication when converting a regular IRA to a Roth IRA?

Converting a traditional IRA to a Roth gives you that future tax-free benefit, but at an immediate tax cost. You'll have to pay taxes on contributions that you previously deducted, as well as on the account's earnings. For more details speak with your plan administrator.

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IRA Plans

If you have a judgment against you in the state of Texas can they take assets from an IRA or a personal corporation?

Depends on what the judgment is for. It the business was a part of the debt, yes. In the case of the IRA, not usually unless it can be proved the contribution(s) constituted fraud.

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IRA Plans

Which is a feature of a Roth IRA?

you can withdraw your earnings once your 59.5 old without paying a penalty. screw plato

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Investing and Financial Markets
IRA Plans
The Difference Between

Can you contribute to a Traditional IRA and a Roth IRA?

Yes, but combined contribution limits apply. For 2008 the maximum contribution amount is $5,000 for individuals under 50 years of age and $6,000 for those over 50. If you are under 50 and contribute $2,000 to your Roth IRA then you can only contribute $3,000 to your Traditional IRA.

For a traditional IRA, you no longer can contribute after the age of 70 1/2 (RMD checks in). For Roth, you can contribute forever since no RMD are taken from this type of IRA account.

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IRA Plans

Can you withdraw funds from your IRA account at anytime?

Yes. But there may be penalties for early withdrawal. And, if it is a traditional IRA there will also be federal (and maybe state) income taxes due, as well as a ten percent penalty to the IRS under most cases, if the withdrawal is made before age 59 1/2. For a roth IRA, there also may be penalties for early withdrawal, but there will be no taxes due if all you withdraw is the amount you originally deposited. Once you are 59 1/2, you may withdraw even the gain without taxes.

414243
Credit and Debit Cards
Credit
IRA Plans

What happens if a parent passes away with unsecured credit card debt but she had money in an IRA which has been distributed to her children?

In my experience, most IRAs have individuals named as beneficiaries. When someone dies the institution will then distribute the IRA assets to each of the beneficiaries into an IRA BDA (beneficiary IRA). In the cases that I have seen this will keep the assets out of probate which means the creditors cannot touch it. This is one very important reason to always make sure your beneficiary information is up to date and don't ever just list "estate" or leave it blank. Even if you pick a charity it is better than letting it go through probate. Same thing should go for life insurance policies, joint accounts with right of survivorship, etc.. The only thing creditors can usually go after are things that do not have bene's named and that go through probate. Creditors are paid first from estate accounts before beneficiaries get anything.

Always consult legal advice from the professionals. This is a typical scenario above but sometimes there may be loopholes or missing details.

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