Sewing

Sewing is simply the stitching and joining of pliable materials, such as cloth, various fabrics, leather, etc. using needle and thread. Sewing can be done by hand or by machines. Questions in this topic also include types of stitches, patterns, and how to do them.

9,124 Questions
Clothing
Sewing

What are different types of fabric?

Fabric and Cloth

There is an enormous variety in fabrics, with many different national, historical and regional varieties. It is interesting to note, however, that almost all of the types of fabric listed below are variants or blends of just five basic fabric types (silk, cotton, linen, wool and worsted). Many of the terms are foreign in origin; English orthography has been adopted where it exists.

Fabric

Description

aba

garment of camel or goat hair; camel or goat-hair fabric

aerophane

thin crinkled semi-transparent fabric

alepine

mixed wool and silk or mohair and cotton fabric

alpaca

fine wool made from alpaca hair

angora

silk-like fabric made from wool of angora goats

ardass

fine silk

armure

twilled woollen or silk fabric

arrasene

embroidery fabric of wool and silk

atlas

rich satin fabric

baft

cheap coarse cotton fabric

bagging

coarse fabric for making bags or sacks

baize

coarse napped cotton or wool fabric

balbriggan

knitted cotton fabric

baldachin

rich embroidered silk and gold fabric

balzarine

light cotton dress material

barathea

pebbly silk or worsted fabric with broken rib weave

barege

gauzy fabric of silk, cotton, wool, or worsted

barracan

fine silk cloth

barras

coarse linen fabric

barrateen

some kind of fabric

batiste

fine soft sheer fabric of plain weave

bayadere

fabric with horizontal stripes in strongly contrasting colours

beaupers

linen fabric used for flags

bengaline

crosswise ribbed fabric

bombazine

twilled silk and worsted fabric

borato

thin fabric

bouclé

fabric of uneven looped yarn

brilliantine

light lustrous cotton and worsted fabric

broadcloth

dense twilled wool or worsted fabric

brocade

rich silk fabric with raised patterns

buckram

stiff-finished cotton or linen used for linings of garments

bump

coarse cotton fabric

bunting

light loosely woven fabric used for flags

burdet

cotton fabric

burlap

coarse plain-woven jute or hemp fabric

burnet

dark brown; dark woollen cloth

burrel

coarse russet cloth

calamanco

satin twilled woollen fabric

calico

plain white cotton

camaca

fine silk fabric

cambresine

fine linen fabric

cambric

fine thin white cotton or linen fabric

camlet

strong waterproof silk or wool fabric

caneva

fancy woollen fabric made to resemble canvas

canque

Chinese cotton fabric

cashmere

soft twilled fabric made of fine goat's wool

cashmerette

soft imitation of cashmere

cassimere

closely woven twilled cloth of fine wool

cendal

silk fabric resembling taffeta

challis

soft lightweight silk, wool or cotton fabric

chambray

lightweight fabric with coloured warp and white filling

chamois

cotton fabric made in imitation of chamois leather

charmante

silk fabric with a crepe back

charmeuse

soft and satiny silk fabric

chenille

velvety silk, wool or cotton fabric with protruding pile

cheviot

coarse heavy plain or twilled wool or worsted

chiffon

sheer silk fabric

chino

strong twilled cotton cloth

chintz

glazed printed cotton fabric

cire

fabric with a glazed finish

cloque

fabric with an embossed design

coburg

thin single-twilled worsted fabric with cotton or silk

cordovan

soft goatskin leather

corduroy

durable cotton piled fabric with vertical ribs

crash

coarse drapery and towelling fabric

crepe

light crinkled fabric

crepon

heavy crepe fabric with lengthwise crinkles

cretonne

heavy cotton or linen cloth

crin

horsehair fabric

crinoline

stiff flax or cotton fabric

cubica

fine unglazed fabric resembling shalloon

cypress

silk or cotton gauze fabric, usually black

damask

fine lustrous fabric with flat patterns and a satin weave

delaine

light fabric of wool or mixed wool and cotton

denim

firm and durable twilled cotton

dimity

sheer and stout white cotton

domett

plain cotton-wool blend

dornick

stout linen

dowlas

coarse linen

drabbet

coarse linen

drap-de-Berry

old woollen cloth

dreadnought

heavy woollen cloth

drill

durable twilled cotton

droguet

ribbed woollen dress fabric

drugget

coarse durable wool fabric

ducape

plain-woven stout silk fabric

duck

durable closely woven cotton fabric

duffel

fabric of thick, low-quality woolen cloth

dungaree

heavy coarse durable twilled cotton, usually coloured

dupion

coarse silk

duroy

coarse woollen

duvetyn

smooth lustrous velvety fabric

ecarlate

fine woollen cloth, usually dyed scarlet

éolienne

fine silk and wool

etamine

light open-mesh cotton or worsted

eyelet

small hole in fabric to allow passage of a cord; cotton fabric with small holes

faille

shiny closely woven silk, cotton or rayon fabric

farandine

silk and wool cloth

filoselle

coarse floss silk

flannel

light woollen fabric

foulard

soft lightweight plain-woven or twilled silk fabric

foulé

light woollen fulled cloth

frieze

rough heavy woollen cloth

fuji

plain spun silk fabric

fustian

coarse twilled cotton

gabardine

closely woven cotton or wool twill

galatea

striped cotton

gambroon

twilled worsted and cloth

gazar

silk organza fabric

genappe

smooth worsted yarn

georgette

thin silk

gingham

striped cotton cloth

grenadine

thin silk

grogram

coarse loosely woven silk fabric

grosgrain

heavy close-woven corded silk

gulix

kind of fine linen

harn

coarse linen

herringbone

twilled fabric woven in rows of parallel sloping lines

hodden

coarse undyed woollen cloth

holland

coarse plain-woven cotton or linen

hopsack

rough-surfaced loose fabric

houndstooth

fabric with an irregular checked pattern

huckaback

absorbent cotton or linen used for towels

jaconet

stout cotton cloth

jacquard

intricately-woven variegated fabric; loom for making jacquard

jaspe

cotton or rayon cloth with shaded effect

jean

durable twilled cotton material

jersey

plain weft-knitted fabric of wool, cotton, nylon or silk

kalamkari

fabric coloured by repeated dyeing

kelt

coarse fabric made of black and white wool

kente

hand-woven African silk fabric

kersey

coarse woollen cloth

kerseymere

twilled fine wool

khaddar

homespun cotton cloth

kincob

embroidered silk with gold and silver threads

lamé

fabric in which metallic threads are interwoven

lasting

sturdy cotton or worsted cloth

lawn

fine sheer plain-woven cotton or linen

leno

open-woven fabric

linsey

coarse linen and wool blend

linsey-woolsey

thin coarse fabric of wool and linen

lockram

coarse linen

loden

heavy waterproof woollen fabric

lustring

glossy silk

lutestring

plain glossy silk

mackinaw

heavy napped and felted wool cloth

mackintosh

lightweight rubberized waterproof cotton

madapollam

fine cotton cloth

madras

fine plain-woven cotton or silk

marabout

thin downy silk

marcella

cotton or linen in twill weave

marocain

ribbed crepe fabric

marquisette

sheer meshed cloth

matelassé

having a quilted ornamentation; fabric with raised pattern as if quilted

melton

strong and smooth heavy woollen cloth

merino

soft wool of the merino sheep; any soft merino-like wool or wool and cotton cloth

messaline

soft lightweight silk with a satin weave

mockado

inferior quality woollen fabric

mogadore

ribbed silk used in making neckties

mohair

fabric made from silky hair of angora goats

moire

watered silk

moleskin

heavy durable cotton

moreen

stout corded wool or cotton

mousseline

fine sheer fabric

mull

soft fine sheer cotton or silk fabric

muslin

plain-woven fine cotton

musterdevillers

archaic mixed grey woollen cloth

nainsook

fine cotton fabric

nankeen

buff-coloured; durable buff-coloured cotton

needlecord

thinly ribbed cotton

ninon

silk voile or other thin fabric

organdie

fine translucent cotton

organza

transparent thin silk or nylon

orleans

interwoven cotton and worsted

osnaburg

coarse linen or cotton

ottoman

heavy clothing fabric with crosswise ribs

oxford

soft durable plain-woven cotton

paduasoy

corded silk

paisley

soft wool fabric with ornamental pattern

panne

heavy lustrous silk or rayon with waxy feel

paramatta

worsted and cotton blend

pashmina

fine goat's wool fabric used for making shawls

pekin

fine soft silk

pellicule

thin diaphanous fabric

percale

closely woven lightweight cloth

percaline

glossy lightweight cotton

perse

dark blue or bluish-grey; cloth of such a colour

piqué

stiff durable corded fabric of cotton, rayon or silk

platilla

fine white linen

plissé

fabric with puckered finish

pongee

thin soft fabric woven from raw silk

poodle

coarsely looped or nubby fabric

poplin

corded woven silk and worsted

prunella

strong and heavy silk or wool

rabanna

raffia fabric of Madagascar

ramie

strong lustrous fabric resembling linen or silk

raploch

coarse undyed woollen cloth

raschel

light loosely kitted cloth

ratiné

rough bulky plain-woven fabric

rep

plain-woven fabric with crosswise ribs

reticella

old Venetian lace-like fabric

romal

handkerchief or headcloth; silk or cotton fabric

rumchunder

fine silk

russel

ribbed cotton and wool

russet

coarse homespun cloth

sagathy

light blend of silk and cotton or wool

samite

rich and heavy silk, sometimes interwoven with gold or silver

sarsenet

fine and soft silk; soft or gentle

satara

ribbed lustred wool

sateen

glossy cotton or wool

satin

closely woven silk with lustrous face

satinet

thin silk satin or imitation thereof

saxony

fine soft woollen fabric

say

delicate woollen fabric

scarlet

fine cloth

scrim

durable plain-woven cotton fabric

seersucker

light puckered cotton or linen fabric

sempiternum

durable wool

sendal

thin silk or linen

serge

strong twilled worsted

shalloon

light twilled wool or worsted

shantung

plain rough silk or cotton

sharkskin

smooth durable wool or worsted fabric

shetland

lightweight loosely twisted wool fabric

shoddy

woollen fabric made from rags

sicilienne

ribbed silk

silesia

thin twilled cotton or linen

silkaline

soft light cotton fabric resembling silk

sindon

fine linen

stammel

coarse woollen fabric, usually dyed red; bright red colour

stockinette

soft elastic cotton fabric

surah

soft twilled silk or rayon

swansdown

heavy napped cotton flannel

swanskin

soft napped fabric resembling flannel

tabaret

striped watered silk and satin fabric

tabby

plain-woven silk taffeta fabric

tabinet

silk and wool watered fabric

taffeta

thin glossy silk

tamin

thin glazed worsted

tamis

thin wool

tarlatan

thin sheer stiff cotton

terry

piled fabric consisting of uncut loops

ticking

strong linen or cotton fabric used for mattress and pillow cases

tiffany

transparent silk-like gauzy fabric

tiretaine

wool cloth mixed with cotton or linen

toile

plain or simple twilled fabric

tricolette

silk or rayon knitted fabric

tricot

plain knitted silk or woollen fabric

tricotine

double-twilled worsted fabric

tulle

sheer and delicate thin silk

tussah

brownish silk fabric

tweed

rough twilled wool

twill

any diagonally woven fabric

velour

piled velvety cotton

veloutine

velvety corded wool

velvet

soft piled fabric of silk, cotton or synthetic material

velvetine

cotton with silk pile

vicuna

fabric made from wool of the vicuna, a small ruminant

voile

soft fine sheer fabric

wadmal

thick coarse wool

whipcord

fabric with bold twill used for making dresses

wigan

stiff plain-woven cotton

wincey

plain or twilled cotton

woolsey

cotton and wool blend

worcester

fine wool

worsted

fine closely-woven wool

zanella

mixed twilled umbrella fabric

zephyr

lightweight wool or worsted fabric; the west wind

zibeline

soft piled wool

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Clothing
Sewing

What is modal fabric?

Soft, breathable, and stretchy, modal is a popular fabric choice for activewear, underwear, and pajamas. Modal is a type of rayon made from beech trees. It's a somewhat high-end fabric, as it’s smoother and more durable than regular rayon with limited wrinkling.

Plus, it's fairly eco-friendly. Since beech trees need far less water than cotton to grow, modal is pretty sustainable to make, and on top of that, it's even biodegradable.

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Sewing
Definitions

What does seam sealed mean?

This is a method used to make materials more waterproof by putting a waterproof tape or liquid sealant along the seams (usually on the inside so it can't be seen.)

~

A couple different ways I seam-seal is buying a product, tho similar to super glue...IS NOT super glue. DRIZ sewing products....carries FRAY CHECK. A simple dot along the fray line of the fabric, helps to seal it.

I also do stay stitching, which is sewing along the edge of the fabric you will finish sewing to make the end product. My fine fabrics (rayon, etc) are treated this way.

Another, which is trickier......I lite a votive candle and quickly but carefully run the seam end piece by it, to create a chemically/heated sealing. This works ONLY on non-organic fabrics.

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Arts and Crafts
Sewing

Who makes Elna sewing machines?

The Elna Design company of Switzerland.

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Clothing
Sewing

What is a selvage on woven fabrics?

The "selvage" is the lengthwise finished edges of a woven fabric. One of the selvages is frequently white, with the name of the fabric, designer, and manufacturer stamped onto it. The opposite selvage is also a woven edge but includes the fabric design. These edges should be removed and not included in piecing as they are woven more tightly and shrink differently than the rest of the fabric. The width of the fabric between the selvage edges is usually 44" or 54", depending on the fabric manufacturer.

One popular trend in quilting is to cut the printed selvage edge from the length of the fabric and use it in "string" block patterns, creating colorful patterns that include the text and color test dots from the printed selvage edges

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Sewing
The Difference Between

What is the difference between velvet and velveteen?

Velvet and velveteen are not the same. Velveteen is a plain, woven fabric with the low pile created from filling loops. Side by side, cotton velvet will be deeper in color and have a denser pile than velveteen.

Originally velvet was woven from silk. Velveteen was woven from cotton. They are similar in that they have a pile - like a carpet. I suspect the distinction is not observed much these days. (Polyester velvets for example)

The best way to tell the difference between velvet and velveteen is to check on the label at the fabric shop. It states quite clearly - velvet or velveteen. Velveteen is made of cotton. Velvet is not. Some may argue this point and say there is such a thing as cotton velvet. What they are really referring to is velveteen. Don't let them fob this off on to you as velvet!

Velvet has a sheen to it that velveteen does not. Velveteen is meant to be fake velvet. When you cut velveteen and look at the little bits that come off the edge you will see that it comes off in tiny little bits that look round (sort of) from a distance.

When you cut velvet, it has bits too, but the little bits are straight. Individual threads in velvet have a sheen to them and an elasticity that velveteen does not.

Velveteen also seems to weigh more than velvet.

Velveteen has a rougher hand than does velvet although both are plush. Experience with the fabrics will help you identify them more readily.

When you do the burn test you will readily see the difference between the two - the cotton is velveteen. Velveteen is a beautiful imitation of velvet - but it is still an imitation.

The pile on velvet is usually higher than on velveteen.

Velveteen is usually cheaper than velvet (unless the velvet is on sale) There are times however that you will find velveteen at a higher price than velvet. But by and large velveteen is cheaper. Although these days both are pretty pricey :)

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Arts and Crafts
Sewing
Earth Sciences
Communication

Types of permanent stitches?

cross stitch

embroidery

metal

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Arts and Crafts
Sewing
Fashion Design

What are some famous embroidery designs in India?

kasuti of karnataka, kashida of kashmir, kantha of bengal, phulkari of punjab, chikankari of uttar pradesh, chamba rumal from himachal.

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Sewing
Chemistry

Why does viscose burn?

Viscose burns because it is cellulose, made out of wood or cotton fibers treated with sodium hydroxide. The resulting liquid is extruded into an acidic bath (converting it back into cellulose) as a sheet (celophane) or as threads from spinnerets to make rayon.

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Arts and Crafts
Sewing

How do you sew patiala suits?

Its pretty much just pleted.. around the waist band.. and the material is doubled

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Clothing
Sewing

Where in the world is cotton made?

Cotton is grown in the northern area like Delaware. Sometimes in Africa or some where like it do. But cotton is grown here in America!

The best, most sought after cotton in the world is grown in the San Joaquin Valley area of California.

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Sewing
Home Appliances

How oldis my Kenmore washer model 110.26902691?

We have that model, which we bought new early 1997.

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Sewing
Quilting

What is a friendship quilt?

A friendship quilt is usually one where there are many contributors. Friends will get together and each make/sew a block of their own. Oftentimes they are signed by the maker. All of the blocks are of the same size although they may have a pattern of some sort within the block. Then the blocks are all sewn together to make the quilt. They are usually made to record memories of friends or family. Many times they are made for a particular person to honor them with a gift for their birthday, retirement, or if they are ill. Putting the quilt together is also a nice social gathering of friends and neighbors.

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Sewing

How do you sew a Dhoti Salwar?

Dhoti Salwar Tutorial can be found at Adithis Amma Sews (link below), along with a Patiala Salwar Tutorial and Indian Clothing sewing tutorials.

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Consumer Electronics
Sewing
Bratz Dolls

Where can you find a Bratz Sew Stylin' Machine owner's manual?

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Arts and Crafts
Sewing

Is a sewing machine 6x faster than hand sewing?

As sewing machine is 6x times faster than hand sewing and it can even be more. It is a good investment to get a sewing machine because it saves a lot of time.

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Arts and Crafts
Sewing

What is the hole in a sewing needle?

It is called the eye of the needle

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Arts and Crafts
Sewing
Quilting

What are temporary stitches?

Temporary stitches, sometimes called "basting stitches" are stitches used to hold fabric in place until the main stitches are put in. These stitches are often larger than normal stitches, and are designed to be easy to remove. Temporary stitches are often done by hand with a needle and thread, but in some cases temporary stitches are placed by using the longest stitch setting on a sewing machine. Because the stitching is further apart, it is easier to insert a seam ripper under the threads, and easily rip out the temporary stitching without damaging the fabric.

A garment sewer will baste a garment with temporary stitches so that the clothes can be tried on and the fit can be adjusted before permanently stitching the fabric together. This allows the garment sewer to make sure that a dress or jacket has a perfect custom fit without tearing out long seams of stitching meant to be more permanent.

In quilting, temporary stitches are often used in paper piecing. The paper

template is stitched to the fabric. This template gives the fabric shape, and prevents it from shifting. Once the fabric has been incorporated into the quilt, the temporary stitches can be removed.

Temporary stitches can also be used when quilting a quilt. A quilter might baste together a quilt top to hold the layers together until it can be formally quilted. Once the quilt has been fully quilted, the basting stitches can be removed.

Cross-stitch

often uses temporary stitches as well. Running threads at 5 or 10 square intervals on a cross-stitch

canvas allows the stitcher

to more easily count across the canvas. These threads are removed when the piece is finished.

In some cases, temporary stitches are removed after the completion of the item. Other times, the temporary stitches are removed as the permanent stitching is put in place. In cases where the temporary stitching is hidden in the seam, it can stay in place after the permanent stitching has been placed.

Temporary stitches are not always taught in sewing classes. We often use pins or spray adhesive to hold fabric together until permanent stitching can be placed.

Temporary stitches are large, easily removed stitches, also called basting stitches. They allow pieces of fabric to be held together long enough for fitting or adjusting, then easily removed to make changes.

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Hobbies & Collectibles
Sewing
Anthropology

When did applique begin?

An applique is a smaller ornament or device applied to another surface. In the context of ceramics, for example, an appliqué is a separate piece of clay added to the primary work, generally for the purpose of decoration. The term is borrowed from French and, in this context, means "applied" or "thing that has been applied."

It did not begin in general, but it has been in use since the 18th century.

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Sewing
Crocheting and Knitting

What does Ss2 mean in knitting?

slip the stitch 2 times. Just slide two stitches onto the other needle and continue on with your pattern. More than likely you'll pick them up again on your next round.

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Arts and Crafts
Sewing

What are ten risks of using a sewing machine?

10 risks of using a sewing machine are:

  1. Sewing over your finger - To avoid this from happening, watch where you are placing your fingers at all times and wear a thimble.
  2. The fabric can separate, and you will find you have only sewed one layer, instead of two
  3. You can thread it incorrectly, or the thread can get snagged and break the needle
  4. The cord can get frayed and cause an electrical short or even fire.
  5. The machine could fall off the table and hurt you.
  6. You could accidentally get your own clothing mixed in with the material you are sewing and sew yourself to the machine.
  7. The pins you use to hold the material together can get stuck in the machine and ruin it.
  8. The pins you use can come out and stick in you.
  9. You might use the wrong size of needle and it will tear your material.
  10. You could run the machine too fast and not get a straight seam.
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Clothing
Sewing

What is a Woven fabric with diagonal lines?

twill

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Clothing
Sewing

Where to buy skinny jeans for teen boys?

it depends what country you are from,

i am from England and i think that these shops may help:

H and M,

TopMan,

Burton,

Hollister, Jack Wills etc.

If you are from the U.S.A you may want to use these shops:

Hollister ect,

A B fits,

American rag,

Even Walmart etc!

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Shopping
Sewing
Collectible Card Games

Where can you buy organza fabric?

joann fabric & craft stores

hobby lobby

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Sewing

What does dart mean in sewing terms?

Stitching in a crease to add shape to the material; mostly to follow the female form.

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