Wireless Networking and WiFi

Questions concerning setting up and troubleshooting a wireless network from Netgear, Linksys, Actiontec or other manufacturers

Asked in Wireless Networking and WiFi

What is the main purpose of an air card?

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The main purpose for using an air card would be to obtain wireless access on the go. An air card can be used with many different wireless devices.
Asked in Computer Hardware, Computer Networking, Wireless Networking and WiFi

How can you reset your lost password for a Belkin wireless router?

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If you are locked out of the router you will need to reset it. There will be a small button (usually at the back) with reset written beside it. You will probably need a paper clip or something to push it. <><><> Next to the power supply connection is a pinhole Reset button. Disconnect all cords from your router except the power cord. Press Reset button with a pin for 10 seconds. Wait 10 more seconds then unplug router. If it is then reset to the original factory settings you will have to reinstall it using software that came with router. You may have to reinstall your network card software as well. <><><> Some, but not all, routers have a reset button. Different routers require different steps to perform resetting. On many of them, to restore your own "personal setup" that was created when you first installed the router - not the original factory settings - you just have to disconnect the power supply and reconnect it after a minute or two. You will need to locate and read the manual if you cannot get to Belkin's support site online.
Asked in Cable Internet, Computer Networking, Wireless Networking and WiFi

Can you install buffalo wireless-g router router without the disk?

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Of course you can. What you need to know is default user name and its password. Also you need to find out its default IP address all that information you can find at http://www.buffalotech.com/support/downloads. Then connect to the router, you can use either a lan cable or wireless interface. Open your browser and punch in the default IP address, after you will be asked to enter default user name and password. If you did everything right you will gain access to the system properties of the router.
Asked in Computer Networking, Wireless Networking and WiFi, Sony Playstation 2, Sony Playstation 3

What is a wireless accesspoint receiver?

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Believe it or not I have seen the need for this before on several occasions. The best way to do this is to use another wireless gateway and set up the two gateways (both must have the capability) as a point-to-point connection. Then you can set up wired ethernet connections on both sides to your heart's content. I would recommmend looking at Avaya hardware to perform this task.
Asked in Computer Networking, Wireless Networking and WiFi, iPod Touch

Will the netgear router ever burn out?

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Possibly, possibly not. It is possible that the router will burn out at some point from use, but it is also possible that the router will not ever burn out (just lose its ability to do other things).
Asked in Computer Networking, Wireless Networking and WiFi, Local Area Network

What is aui port in router?

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Attachment Unit Interface (AUI) is an interface that was used as Medium Independent Interface to connect to different connectors such as RJ45 & Coaxial connectors.
Asked in Computer Networking, Internet, Wireless Networking and WiFi

How do you stop your neighbor from illegally accessing the Internet with your wireless network connection?

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It's not "illegal" if your router is configured to grant them access to your network. The law only prohibits "unauthorized access of a computer network". When someone uses their computer to request access, and your router grants access with no password, then their access of your network is authorized. I always configure my routers to share my connection with neighbors and visitors (in a secure way, of course). If you enable WEP encryption, and they crack the encryption in order to access it, then it's illegal, because their access was unauthorized. But this only makes it illegal for them, it doesn't actually stop them. WEP is very easy to crack, and basically useless. Disabling SSID broadcast is also useless. While WEP will certainly put you a step ahead of no security at all, if the neighbor is determined to use your wireless network they can break WEP encryption pretty simply using aircrack, a freely available tool. To really stop them, you need to use the stronger encryption offered by WPA or WPA2, which is available on all newer wireless routers. Then it is both illegal and difficult (if not impossible) for them to crack. When enabling encryption, use a passphrase. It is MUCH easier to set up on other computers than it is to type 42 randomly chosen letters and numbers! With the SSID changed from the default, broadcast of that name disabled and with the encryption set at 128, it will practically be impossible for your neighbor to get online by using your router. The neighbor may SEE your wireless network but will not be able to access it without the correct passphrase. If you enable WPA you will have the option of using TKIP or AES encryption. Choose the stronger AES encryption if your router and client systems will support it. Although most neighbors will not be sophisticated to take advantage of it, there is an identified vulnerability in the TKIP algorithm for WPA for which exploits are available. You are better off using the AES encryption.,
Asked in Wireless Networking and WiFi, Cisco, The Difference Between

What is the difference between router and switch?

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Router is a layer 3 and switch is a layer 2 device. Router connects many networks together and Switch connects many devices to a network.
Asked in Electrical Engineering, Wireless Networking and WiFi, Laptops, C Sharp

Why my Wireless connection is not working on my laptop?

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Wireless problems I have a similar problem with my laptop. I have a Fujitsu-Siemens Lifebook, one that has been great over the past year for college, etc. However, my wireless internet connection suddenly went off the other day with no warning, with the modem showing that there was no local network and the laptop showing no available connection. First thing to do - check wireless is turned on. It sounds basic, but sometimes the switch can get knocked, meaning that the laptop won't recieve any wireless signal. If this doesn't work, play around with the settings for a while - if you're running Windows you can go to 'network connection' in Control Panel and right-click on your wireless connection; go to 'repair' and the repair wizard will go through it to try and fix it. Make sure both the wireless switch on your laptop is turned on, and that your modem is turned on too. If this doesn't work, go to your modem's setup page (usually a web page - the address will be in the manual) and choose a different wireless channel - 0, 6 and 11 are the only non-overlapping channels. You may want to adjust your wireless signal power to make sure you have enough signal. You might also want to run a diagnostic on your modem to see if it is running properly. Some modems will display on the setup page which computers are active. See if yours comes up. If this still doesn't work, you may want to go to an internet cafe or other wireless hotspot to check whether it is your modem which is at fault. If you get a signal and can connect, then it may well be the modem at fault. Check at some other locations just to be sure. If not, it sounds like the wireless card has a problem. If it is an internal wireless card, you might want to take it back to the manufacturer for repair. If it is an external wireless adapter, you may just want to replace the card or adapter to see if this helps.
Asked in Wireless Networking and WiFi

Can you use a Belkin 802.11g router to connect to another wireless network and then share the other wireless network though its own 4 Ethernet ports?

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The wireless bridge function is no longer available. All recent versions of the Belkin F5D7230-4 router (version 7000 and above) no longer support this function although I cannot find any announcement on the Belkin website. Check the version number on the outside of the package. The web screen for version 7000 does not have the "wireless bridge" option. This is from a search I did on the Belkin web site. This tells you how to setup the router to become a bridge. How To: Configure WDS (Wireless Bridging) with the 54g router The information in this article applies to the following products: 802.11g Wireless DSL/Cable Gateway Router (F5D7230-4) 802.11g Wireless Network Access Point (F5D7130) Router Configuration 1. Open a Web Browser 2. In the address bar type http://192.168.2.1 3. Click on Wireless Bridge in the left hand column under Wireless 4. Enter your password if any and click Submit 5. Check the box that says Enable Wireless Bridging, click Apply Changes. 6. Click Home, note the WLAN MAC address under LAN settings Access Point Configuration. 1. Open a Web Browser 2. In the address bar type http://192.168.2.254 3. Click on Wireless Bridge in the left hand column under Wireless 4. Enter your password if any and click Submit 5. Check the box that says, Enable Wireless Bridging 6. Check the box that says, Enable ONLY specific Access Points to connect and enter the WLAN MAC address from the router, click Apply Changes. Note: The channel must be identical on both the router and the access point. Note: The WDS feature is not completely specified in IEEE or Wifi standards. Therefore interoperability between 802.11 products of different vendors is not guaranteed. Yes, you can, but only using Belkin Router and Access Point, or 2 Belkin Routers (one configured as AP). You must set the MAC Addresss of AP in the Router and the WEP (Also channels must match). I have 2 Belkin routers in Bridge. You know it is working when you get DHCP from the AP. I tried using two belkin routers (802.11g, Firmware 4.05.03, Boot 2.01.09, Model F5D7230-4V4) in a chain. The layout is like this: Cable Modem <- Belkin Router A <- Belkin Router B <- rest of the network. I configured Router A with "Enable wireless bridge" and "Enable specific access points to connect". I used WEP 128bit (WPA did not work) -- same channel ID and SSID. I got DHCP from Router A to the machines connected to Router B, but after a while Router B doesn't respond any more. Last night, I set it up, checked the connectivity, and in the morning it is not there any more. Any idea about what could be going wrong? Thanks, Is Router B set up as a bridge as well? Both routers have to be set up as bridges to work. WDS Only This is a related answer and it adds extra WDS/bridging setup info. Credit goes to the people on fatwallet forums who gave me the last missing puzzle piece. I write this away from the hardware being discussed so no exact menu/option names are used but it should be clear enough if you banged your heads on the walls trying to get it to work. I hope this disambiguates enough as not to be completely redundant. The configuration discussed is illustrated below: DSL Modem -- Wired router -- Wireless router A \/ ... \/ Wireless router B Wireless router A = Belkin F5D7320-4 v3000 w factory firmware Wireless router B = Belkin F5D7320-4 v2000 w factory firmware Motivation: The wireless network uses a different address than the wired network and router A has NAT enabled i.e. it works as a gateway. Router B has NAT disabled and is used to connect some wired ethernet clients to the internet. Router A also has one wired client. The location of some of the clients makes it difficult to use cables so WDS is used. The beef: There are two important observations that come up during setup but are badly documented on the web: After changing certain settings the router has to be restarted (hard reset, unplug) BUT not after each change AND there is a better way, see 2. If this is not done I found that some settings didn't take effect. Rebooting takes ~30s. The"restart router" option didn't seem satisfactory and I don't recommend it for this scenario. Saving the router settings via its menu and then immediately restoring instead of a hard reset seems to work reliably and it's faster. However if things don't work as expected fallback to 1. The routers use WDS and work as access points; note that they are NOT used as dedicated APs, meaning the switch hw is enabled on both. As mentioned above, only router A uses NAT. Both routers have static IPs and no DHCP server is enabled. If you enable the DHCP server on the router do it only for one of them. For BOTH routers in the WDS section there are 3 important settings each w a check box and all are checked. The first enables the WDS/bridging. The second lists the MAC addresses allowed to connect (on router A you put the MAC of router B and vice versa) The third DISABLES the client's ability to connect to the APs! This is an important point for two reasons: WDS uses bandwith and the wireless throughput decreases for the wireless clients. It is possible to allow them to connect which brings us to the second point. if the clients are ALLOWED to connect to the APs (w WDS enabled), ONLY WEP security will work! Your network's security will be limited to WEP. Security: I wanted to use only WDS but I wanted better security than WEP. The WDS page on both routers mentions only WEP security which is misleading. Both routers support WPA (but NOT WPA2) with PSK or Radius servers. This setup uses WPA-PSK. I tested both TKIP and AES and both work. When setting up WPA-PSK with TKIP or AES remember to use the same password on both routers and to double check for typos before "obscuring" it (if you so choose). Channel and SSID: Both routers have to use the same channel. Both routers have to use the SAME SSID. When using it with WEP and allowing client access for both 802.11b and 802.11g I used different SSIDs for roaming and that works as well. In that scenario the settings below were tried in almost all combinations and didn't interfere with the WDS. "Clientless" WDS didn't work with different SSIDs when I first tried it but I didn't experiment any more. If you want it to work as described this is irrelevant but you can always try it *8-) SSID broadcast is disabled but it's not important for this discussion. For better throughput I enabled only 54g disabled the protected mode enabled the turbo mode (on the v2000 it's called something else; maybe "frame bursting") If you enable MAC filtering remember to enter into BOTH routers the MACs of ALL your clients and the routers themselves. They will go in a different section than WDS related MACs! Remember to do this for all new hardware as you add it. Summary: WDS/bridging w WPA-PSK is possible without allowing wireless clients and using the same SSID on both routers. Using WDS and allowing wireless clients is possible only with WEP and then you can use different SSIDs. The ability to use WPA gives new life to this old hardware and if you can find it don't hesitate to use it.
Asked in Computer Networking, Internet, Wireless Networking and WiFi

Can multiple computers be connected wireless?

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sure, just get 2 wireless NIC Cards and install them both into the computers, then get a Wireless Router, and depending on your operating system, you may need to install more networking protocols. As far as having them both use A dial up connection. that i have never done before, but you should be able to do that using Internet Connection sharing
Asked in Computer Networking, Computer Printers, Wireless Networking and WiFi

How can you connect two computers to one printer?

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Connect the primary, or first, computer to the printer. This is done traditionally with a printer cable linking the primary computer to the printer. If this is the first time the computer is hooked up to the printer, be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions for installation and setup. Change the settings on the primary computer to allow sharing of the printer. Go through the control panel menu option, and select printers. Right-click on the printer selection and choose "Share printer." You are now able to share the printer with any other computers on your network. Connect the secondary computer to the printer. Access the shared printer option from the secondary computer. Select "network neighborhood" and locate the primary computer. Double-click on the primary computer, and the shared resources will become available. Double-click on the printer. You can now utilize the printer from both computers. or Print sharing has become popular in many home networks primarily because it reduces the cost in implementing networking environments as well as maximizing the potential uses of network resources. The process of hooking two computers to a single printer is very much different from connecting two printers to a single computer because unlike computer systems, printing devices normally only have one communication port that can host a connection. To achieve the task of connecting two computers to a single printer, other devices would have to come into the picture to serve as the host for the printer and provide the underlying communication layer for all devices trying to make use of its printing functionality. The Operating System running on both machines that want to make use of the printing device must also support networking and printer sharing features in order to make this task feasible. Materials Needed: - Router - Ethernet cable - USB switch - crossover cable - network card - print server - Operating System that supports printer sharing Step 1 One of the easiest options to share a printer on networked machines is to connect and install it in one of the machines. Simply click on the 'Start' button and choose the 'Control Panel' category. Step 2 Select the 'Printer and Faxes' option and click on the 'Add a Printer' task. This will bring up the printer installation page. Make sure to install the printer hardware as a local printer. Follow the prompts to complete the installation process. Step 3 When completely installed, click on the 'Start' button and select the 'Printer and Faxes' category. The icon for the newly installed printer should be there already. Right click on the icon and select sharing. Step 4 Provide a shared name for the printing device and click on the 'OK' button. Step 5 On the other computer, repeat Step 1 to Step 2 but this time, choose the network printer option. Type in the name of the printer and follow the prompts. Install the device driver when prompted to do so. Step 6 A variation of this method which eliminates the use of a router device is to connect the two machines using a crossover cable. Simply insert one end into the NIC of the machine and repeat the process for the other computer. Step 7 Both machines must be running at least Microsoft Windows XP to allow for the automatic detection of the network connection. This procedure basically functions the same way as a network environment but is limited to two machines and does not require a router. Step 8 An alternative to this setup is to install a Print Server which will host the printer hardware and connect directly to the network router. In this method, simply connect the printer to the printer server. Step 9 Proceed by connecting the print server to the network router which will allow the printer hardware to be detected in the network environment as a standalone device. To print using this method, simply use the IP address assigned to the printing device. Step 10 Another possible solution is to use switching devices. These types of hardware became popular when printers were hosted using parallel and serial cable connections. For USB-based machines, a USB Switch box may be used. Connect the printer directly to the box using the USB cable. Step 11 Connect the USB cable from each computer to the respective USB ports on the switching device. To use the printer for computer A, simply set the switch to A and do the same for B. In this method, no additional installation is required. All data switching and handling activities are done by the hardware switch.
Asked in Wireless Networking and WiFi

What is the password for Netgear32?

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When you purchase NETGEAR, you will either be given a password or have an opportunity to choose one. If you have forgotten or lost the password, you can contact NETGEAR to get another one.
Asked in Computer Networking, Wireless Networking and WiFi, The Difference Between

What is the difference between a modem and a router?

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Difference between a Modem and a Router In simple terms, a modem is a device that converts, or modulates, analog signals into digital data, or vice versa. In terms of computer networking, a modem takes a signal provided by your Internet Service Provider, or ISP (via power lines, coaxial, etc.) and converts it into data your computer can comprehend to be the Internet. A form of a modem is also often found within a computer, which allows it to connect to the network. A router, on the other hand, often works within the network as a postal office, metaphorically speaking. In general terms, it allows an Internet connection to be shared by multiple connections within one Local Area Network, or LAN. The router, unlike switches or hubs, checks the destination of the packet and sends it accordingly. Many modern routers also contain a firewall, which generally blocks incoming port connections. Wireless routers still function similarly, but allow computers the ability to connect to the network through wireless means. These two devices are often used together, or are even combined into one device. The modem supplies the Internet, while the router divides it among multiple computers. The modem also works as an external mask for each of the computers on the network, and the router allows the computers to transfer data between one another. More explanations from our contributors: A modem is generally used to convert one type of media to another - in order to form a bridge. There will always be 2 modems involved (one on either side of the bridge). For example, because it is impossible for your ISP to supply you with a 5-km-long ethernet cable due to various limitations, the ethernet connection is bridged by a telephone or cable wire with modems on either end. In an enterprise environment such as an ISP, a school campus or a large corporate office, a router will be used to route traffic between Local Area Networks, and ultimately between Internet endpoints. Although, in many places where large-scale Internet connection is required, a switch is used to maintain speed by removing the need to route each packet to its proper destination. Modems are instrumental in communicating with the computers that provide the Internet. Routers take the information received by the modem and split it amongst many computers.
Asked in Computer Networking, Internet, Wireless Networking and WiFi

How do you make wireless router receive a signal?

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To have your router get a better signal, try placing it an a open area, like a loft area or a living room. Most homes nowadays have loft areas where most people place their entertainment center, computer desk etc.
Asked in Wireless Networking and WiFi

Does a wireless router have cords?

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Unless somebody stole them from you then yes a wireless router does have cords. You have the power cord which connects the power to the device and you have the Ethernet cables which are used to connect the wireless router to the modem and to any other hard-wired devices.
Asked in Wireless Networking and WiFi

What is the best WiFi extender antenna out?

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Hawking Hi-Gain wifi extender is great.
Asked in Computer Networking, Windows XP, Wireless Networking and WiFi

How can you prevent your internet files and chat files from being viewed over your wireless home network by your family members?

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Basic security tips used in a workplace. - Use Windows 2000 or XP to allow for each user to have their own accounts on each computer. - Change the security settings on your own user profile (typically C:\Documents and Settings\Username) so that only you have access to it (and not administrators & you). - Implement 128-bit encryption on your wireless network so that data isn't being broadcasted in plain text. - Use a program like Window Washer 5 to clear out your internet cache and visited sites regularly. - Don't log chat files or if you need to, be sure they are stored in your profile what only you have access to. - Don't share accounts! - If you have others connecting to your wireless network that you don't want on it, either use a WEP key or implement a MAC address list of authorized devices into the router/access point to prevent unwanted users. - Don't store sensitive data in an open location where a lot of people can access it. If all else fails, stop cheating on your spouse.
Asked in Cable Internet, Computer Networking, Telecommunications, Wired Broadband Data Access, Wireless Networking and WiFi

Can I replace my adsl modem with a modem router?

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Yes you can because the modem router has a modem built in. There are different types of modem routers that suit different needs. If you are only going to be surfing the web you will need a "N" modem router, if you are going to be sharing files then you will need a "N+" modem router and if you are going to be gaming e.g. connecting to a Xbox 360 or PlayStaion 3 you will need a "N+N" modem router, I would personally recommend Belkin modem routers. Hope you find this useful!
Asked in Computer Networking, Windows XP, Wireless Networking and WiFi

Where do you find your WEP key in a computer network?

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You only need a WEP key if you connect using wireless. LAN connections do not require a WEP key. You should be able to find the WEP key by accessing your wireless router. Usually, to do this, you need to connect to the router using an Ethernet cable. Then open up a web browser (such as Firefox or Internet Explorer) and browse to 192.168.2.1. This is a common IP address for routers. However, some routers are configured differently, so try 10.0.0.1 and 192.168.1.1 as well. If those 3 IP addresses do not work, check Google or the manual to find your router's default IP. NOTE - The IP codes do not work using google chrome If you are prompted for a password and you have changed it, enter the new user/password. If not, the most common default user/password is admin/admin. You should now have the setup screen for your router. Go to the "wireless" tab and you should see your WEP key; however, it may be encrypted. If it is, just change the WEP key to whatever you want. Note to users of Windows 7: If your computer is connected to the router you wish to find the WEP key of, then follow these steps. Open Network and Sharing Center by right-clicking your connection icon at the bottom-right corner of the screen. Click the link of the network you're connected to. (Should say "Wireless Network Connection 'router's name here') Then click the button "Wireless Properties" Then click the Security tab It should show your Security, and Encryption type. Also there should be your password in secret bullet form. Simply click "Show characters" and Voila! Your WEP key should be staring you in the face. Another way of finding the WEP: Look on the bottom of your wireless router; the numbers that are between the ( ) bars are the WEP key.
Asked in Computer Networking, Computer Printers, Wireless Networking and WiFi

Why after printing or plotting the network printers in the printer folder in the control panel disappears and you are unable to print?

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Without knowing the printer/plotters you are using and what operating system you are using it is really hard to say. Most likely it is a memory problem or it could potentially be a corrupt printer/plotter driver or a corrupt print spooler.