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2007-12-06 16:30:35
2007-12-06 16:30:35

If the husband is the policy "owner", and the children are listed as "revocable" beneficiaries, then the change can be made. However, you can be sure [that] when the husband dies, the new beneficiary designation will be challenged. Think carefully about this before you act. Perhaps , assuming the husband is insurable, a new (additional) policy should be purchased naming the new wife as the primary beneficiary.

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