Custody
Emancipation and Ages for Moving Out

Can a parent have the court order the child to remain in parents custody until 18yr of age?

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2012-03-23 23:14:44
2012-03-23 23:14:44

If you are divorced and granted custody that court order is valid unless the other parent (or the state) get custody for whatever reason (if both parents become unfit etc). And custody lasts until the child is 18. You can not get a guarantee from the judge that you as a parent will have custody until the child is 18. There are 2 parents and according to the law both are allowed to seek custody of their child.

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If the case involves the teen's parents and custody of the teen then she/he has no standing to petition the court. A parent must do it for the child.

Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.

The parent will go to jail and lose custody of their child, or will have "reason of insanity" guilt. If the parent does have a partner and he/she loses custody, the child will be yours.

If the child is a minor in the state of Utah and the parents of the child have never been married then both parents are awarded equal custody. However, if there's a reason why one parent cannot care for the child, then the parent who is capable of caring for the child is awarded custody.

He can request custody or a visitation order if he is the father of the child. At the same time you should petition to remain the custodial parent and request a child support order.He can request custody or a visitation order if he is the father of the child. At the same time you should petition to remain the custodial parent and request a child support order.He can request custody or a visitation order if he is the father of the child. At the same time you should petition to remain the custodial parent and request a child support order.He can request custody or a visitation order if he is the father of the child. At the same time you should petition to remain the custodial parent and request a child support order.

Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.Domiciliary custody refers to the parent who has physical custody. It's the parent with whom the child lives.

The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.The parent who will have physical custody is the parent who can request child support.

The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.The parent with physical custody receives child support from the other parent.

Yes, if that parent has sole legal custody of the child.Yes, if the parents are unmarried and the other parent (father) hasn't established his paternity legally.Yes, if that parent has sole legal custody of the child.Yes, if the parents are unmarried and the other parent (father) hasn't established his paternity legally.Yes, if that parent has sole legal custody of the child.Yes, if the parents are unmarried and the other parent (father) hasn't established his paternity legally.Yes, if that parent has sole legal custody of the child.Yes, if the parents are unmarried and the other parent (father) hasn't established his paternity legally.

If the step parent files for custody, and the judge awards custody of the child to them.

In the state of California, the custody of a child will remain with the better suited parent. Like many states, child custody in California is usually a joint custody agreement unless there are extenuating circumstances.

That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.That phrase is in error.Sole custody means that one person, usually a parent, has full legal and physical custody. Joint custody means that both parents share legal custody although the child may live with one parent who has physical custody.

No. Only parents are granted custody of their children by a court order. You cannot assign custody to a non-parent nor will the court. When a party other than the parent gets "custody" of a child it is done via a guardianship and must be obtained through a court. The person who requests the guardianship is appointed the child's legal guardian, the child is deemed the guardian's ward, and the case will remain under the jurisdiction of the court. There can be no guardian appointed if a parent has custody.No. Only parents are granted custody of their children by a court order. You cannot assign custody to a non-parent nor will the court. When a party other than the parent gets "custody" of a child it is done via a guardianship and must be obtained through a court. The person who requests the guardianship is appointed the child's legal guardian, the child is deemed the guardian's ward, and the case will remain under the jurisdiction of the court. There can be no guardian appointed if a parent has custody.No. Only parents are granted custody of their children by a court order. You cannot assign custody to a non-parent nor will the court. When a party other than the parent gets "custody" of a child it is done via a guardianship and must be obtained through a court. The person who requests the guardianship is appointed the child's legal guardian, the child is deemed the guardian's ward, and the case will remain under the jurisdiction of the court. There can be no guardian appointed if a parent has custody.No. Only parents are granted custody of their children by a court order. You cannot assign custody to a non-parent nor will the court. When a party other than the parent gets "custody" of a child it is done via a guardianship and must be obtained through a court. The person who requests the guardianship is appointed the child's legal guardian, the child is deemed the guardian's ward, and the case will remain under the jurisdiction of the court. There can be no guardian appointed if a parent has custody.

Yes, as long as the parent giving consent has legal custody of the child in question. In cases where parents have joint custody over a child both parents would have to agree to the change.

That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.That non-custodial parent has no right to "keep" the child. A parent who refuses to bring the child back to the parent who has physical custody or joint custody is in contempt of court and risks losing custody.

A custodial parent is the parent who has custody of the child. Usually, that would be both parents. A residential parent is the parent who the child lives with the most.

No. The parent with sole legal custody has the right to make decisions regarding the child.No. The parent with sole legal custody has the right to make decisions regarding the child.No. The parent with sole legal custody has the right to make decisions regarding the child.No. The parent with sole legal custody has the right to make decisions regarding the child.

Generally, the parent without physical custody but the court will decide.

Both parents are. The parent who does not have residential custody usually pay child support to the one who has residential custody to be used to pay for the child. Both have to pay for their child.

There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.There are two types of custody: legal and physical. The parent with legal custody has the right to choose which school the child attends. If both parents share legal custody then the decision cannot be made by one parent. Both must agree. That is why joint custody only works well when parents have a congenial relationship.

Joint custody is a court order whereby custody of a child is awarded to both parties. In joint custody both parents are "custodial parents" and neither parent is a non-custodial parents, or in other words the child has two custodial parents.

If the parents share physical and legal custody equally then whoever the child is with at the time is the custodial parent. Both have equal parental/custodial rights.If the parents share physical and legal custody equally then whoever the child is with at the time is the custodial parent. Both have equal parental/custodial rights.If the parents share physical and legal custody equally then whoever the child is with at the time is the custodial parent. Both have equal parental/custodial rights.If the parents share physical and legal custody equally then whoever the child is with at the time is the custodial parent. Both have equal parental/custodial rights.

If two parents share joint custody of a child, but one has physical custody, then the non-custodial parent usually pays child support to help the parent with whom the child lives. It depends on the laws of your state - most states now have an online child support calculator.

That parent must return to court and request a change in custody. Until the court has modified the existing orders they remain in effect.That parent must return to court and request a change in custody. Until the court has modified the existing orders they remain in effect.That parent must return to court and request a change in custody. Until the court has modified the existing orders they remain in effect.That parent must return to court and request a change in custody. Until the court has modified the existing orders they remain in effect.

Shared legal custody means that both parents have equal rights to make decisions regarding the child. One parent may have physical custody with the non-physical-custody parent paying child support.


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